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I Invite You to See the True Colours of Feathered Dinosaur

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posted on Aug, 28 2015 @ 04:46 PM
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a reply to: swanne

Very Cool. Thanks for posting this.

When my boy's were growing up, I was introduced into the world of Dinosaurs and really got into it.
I will let them know about this thread. I know they will really enjoy it.

I still have a huge box downstairs of plastic Dino's of all different sizes.

As with lego's, they hurt like hell when you step on one in the middle of the night. LOL!!!





posted on Aug, 28 2015 @ 04:58 PM
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It's a pigeon



posted on Aug, 28 2015 @ 05:31 PM
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a reply to: swanne

Wow.... Nature's variety never ceases to amaze me!



posted on Aug, 28 2015 @ 05:34 PM
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Very cool.

I hope someday they can do the same for dinosaurs.



posted on Aug, 28 2015 @ 06:17 PM
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Interesting...an extension of what was discovered in 2010...

news.nationalgeographic.com...

i wonder when we will have an ability to look through reconstructions of various dinosaurs and get a real idea of what they looked like?



posted on Aug, 28 2015 @ 08:06 PM
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originally posted by: nonjudgementalist
It's a pigeon


I thought the same thing.

That 'bar' pattern on the side shows up on pigeon wings.



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 01:25 AM
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a reply to: swanne

What a fascinating creature that would be to see in person.



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 01:34 AM
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I can't wait to see a dinosaur movie with dinosaurs that are more colorful vibrant and lively.

Kind of upset Jurassic Park went backward again with their over sized velociraptors (*cough* deinonychus*cough*) . Last movie before this one they had some feathers.



This would have been awesome!!! Guess they don't consider it scarey enough.



edit on 8/29/2015 by Puppylove because: To add a nifty picture, look at the nifty picture, LOOK AT IT!!!!



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 02:11 AM
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So it turns out that some of the dinosaurs of the past do not look much different from our present dinosaurs.

This dinosaur of our present day looks quite dinosaur-ish:


So who says Dinosaurs are extinct ? Behold, their direct offspring...
edit on 29-8-2015 by nOraKat because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 02:35 AM
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a reply to: nOraKat

Absolutely correct, awesome isn't it?



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 02:41 AM
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originally posted by: Skid Mark
a reply to: swanne
It's a huge leap from what they were teaching when I was in school. Back then, they said dinosaurs were reptiles. If they figure out what other dinosaurs, including T Rex, looked like I wonder how that would affect future movies like Jurassic Park. Knowing Hollywood, it probably wouldn't change much. They'd still be lizards. Anyway, cool find.


They've already acknowledged that for Jurassic World/Park. They said they stuck with the reptile looking ones for continuity and in the film Jurassic World, the lead scientist even makes a reference that they don't look like the real thing owing to the engineering needed to clone them.



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 02:45 AM
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a reply to: stumason

Still sucks, I mean, when else are we going to get a movie that well funded with dinosaurs in it... Is a lost opportunity, it'll be forever before we see a true awesome feathered dinosaur on the big screen. It depresses me greatly.



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 02:51 AM
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a reply to: Puppylove

Yeah, I agree, but sadly them being big scaly monsters is so engrained in the public conciousness it's going to take a while to change it. It's not just the movies, but anything dinosaur related generally has them as scaly reptiles, from toys to cartoons.

I did read some years back that T-Rex was probably pink - that just wouldn't have the same effect I don't think on the big screen!

Also, some other researchers a few months back have found evidence of feathers on sauropods as well as therapods - even the mighty Brachiosaurus or Argentinasaurus were probably fluffy!



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 02:54 AM
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a reply to: stumason

Even they? That would be sooooooo cool to see!!!!



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 02:59 AM
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a reply to: Puppylove

Yeah, I think they said the young would have had a downy coating (kind of how baby elephants are fluffy I suppose) and the adults would have had filaments at various places for display, warning etc but not a full on coat.



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 03:04 AM
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a reply to: stumason

Still awesome!!! I think the new image of dinosaurs looks more real. I always thought dinosaurs looked off when I was younger and the reptile claim never fit with me. Physically they're too far off the ground, the legs were always way too off for reptiles to me even when young. Plus they were always too plain in pictures and non lively.



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 05:55 AM
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a reply to: swanne

Cool! Nice find!

That dinosaur is very beautiful, isn't it? Doesn't change the fact its still a carnivore, albeit colourful, but still...

I never thought about the process they discovered, and yet its so obvious...

Well, S&F, and amazing discovery, my dear one!



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 06:35 AM
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a reply to: Annee

Well, technically, feathered dinosaurs are dinosaurs.


 

a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

For that, one would need to apply a variant of the method on fossilized skin. I think searching for pigments in skin is not that hard - what is hard is to come across well-preserved dinosaur skin! Soft tissue rarely survives 65 million years.


edit on 29-8-2015 by swanne because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 08:15 AM
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a reply to: swanne

They actually developed the skin technique first. The above article is from 2010.

ETA:


Found in the feathers of living birds, the nano-size packets of pigment—a hundred melanosomes can fit across a human hair—were first reported in fossil bird feathers in 2008.


news.nationalgeographic.com...

Seems like what it is, is that the pigments are in "dino fuzz". They were covered in down. Or feather hair. Or whatever.



edit on 8/29/2015 by bigfatfurrytexan because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 29 2015 @ 08:45 AM
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originally posted by: stumason
a reply to: Puppylove



I did read some years back that T-Rex was probably pink - that just wouldn't have the same effect I don't think on the big screen!



Personally, I think that would be scary as hell, but maybe that's just me.







 
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