It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

NASA Says Three Feet of Sea Level Rise Is Unavoidable

page: 8
24
<< 5  6  7    9 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 07:09 AM
link   
NOAA now saying sea level rise likely to be between 1.7 and 1.8 millimetres per year, it is it is just over 300 millimetres to one foot...
So at, say 2 millimetres per year, that is 150 years to one foot? is that right?




posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 07:17 AM
link   

originally posted by: pikestaff
is that right?


You math is correct, 300mm is slightly less than one foot.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 08:15 AM
link   

originally posted by: PublicOpinion
a reply to: butcherguy

And now imagine:

the first ice-free Arctic summer

... in 30 years

How does that fit into the equasion? Just curious.


I am not sure.
You tell me how much the ice free Arctic will raise the sea level.
Then we will wait for it to happen.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 08:17 AM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: butcherguy




It is a guess.

Yours?

Yep.
You should guess too.
Then we can compare.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 08:30 AM
link   

originally posted by: butcherguy

originally posted by: PublicOpinion
a reply to: butcherguy

And now imagine:

the first ice-free Arctic summer

... in 30 years

How does that fit into the equasion? Just curious.


I am not sure.
You tell me how much the ice free Arctic will raise the sea level.
Then we will wait for it to happen.


Doesn't the Arctic ice hold back the glaciers? So if the ice was gone wouldn't they freely flow into the sea and raise the sea level?
edit on 31-8-2015 by Grimpachi because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 08:54 AM
link   
One thIng you can guarantee with humans is this.

They will argue wether something is or isn't happening, does exist or doesn't exist, but they always leave it till the last minute or until it is too late do anything about it.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 09:09 AM
link   
a reply to: Grimpachi

I think they forget that there's also a lot of land ice in the Arctic... like the Greenland Ice Sheet then all the land ice on countries that border the Arctic like Russia, the US (Alaska), Canada,Norway, Finland, Sweden and Iceland.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 09:18 AM
link   

originally posted by: Kali74
a reply to: Grimpachi

I think they forget that there's also a lot of land ice in the Arctic... like the Greenland Ice Sheet then all the land ice on countries that border the Arctic like Russia, the US (Alaska), Canada,Norway, Finland, Sweden and Iceland.

One would think it should have melted already, being at a lower latitude.
We have had an ice free arctic predicted and missed before.
It doesn't matter much to me.
It really wouldn't be the end of the world.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 09:30 AM
link   
a reply to: Kali74

I am just hoping this doesn't happen too quickly. Miami is already having problems from tidal surges. The population there is 417,000 if they get displaced then my neck of the woods is sure to see an influx.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 01:28 PM
link   
a reply to: Grimpachi

That is one of the biggest problems in modern times, we have too many people living in areas in the coast that were not mean to be lived at, most of the coast in the US has been maintained by artificial means because the real state value, because erosion has always been a problem in the coast.

Florida was under water for a long time, before the ocean retreated in the last ice age, historical data put Florida as the mass is today about 10,000 years ago.

Florida's Geologic History

dep.state.fl.us...

The Mississippi delta will suffer greatly from any rises in sea levels as the natural delta in the area was tampered with for decades by man, in order to control the natural water flow, this water flow, is what used to keep the area build up of sediment, the erosion of sediment will eventually be the downfall of the city of New Orleans.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 01:30 PM
link   

originally posted by: Grimpachi
The population there is 417,000 if they get displaced then my neck of the woods is sure to see an influx.


But think of the benefits, you do not have to travel far for Cuban coffee and good ropa vieja.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 01:34 PM
link   
a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

My mother makes some delicious ropa vieja, in Puerto Rico is call carne vieja, interestingly the Caribbean Islands seat on top of underwater mountains, so the raise of ocean will not affect the Islands much.

Now if we were to have another Ice age, that actually we are due to one soon, we will get connected and who knows Atlantis may rise from the ocean once again.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 01:36 PM
link   

originally posted by: marg6043
My mother makes some delicious ropa vieja, in Puerto Rico is call carne vieja...


I love Caribbean cuisine.


Now if we were to have another Ice age, that actually we are due to one soon, we will get connected and who knows Atlantis may rise from the ocean once again.


I was hoping it would be R'lyeh instead.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 01:39 PM
link   
a reply to: marg6043




That is one of the biggest problems in modern times, we have too many people living in areas in the coast that were not mean to be lived at



I think you are ignoring pretty much all of human history with that remark.




Florida was under water for a long time, before the ocean retreated in the last ice age, historical data put Florida as the mass is today about 10,000 years ago.


That sentence should be broken up because it would lead one to believe that Florida was underwater until about 10K years ago.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 01:47 PM
link   
a reply to: Grimpachi

Florida is more of a build up of sediment than a land mass, the shape Florida have today was finally acquired about 10,000 years ago, at the end of the last ice age.

So in my views Florida will be one of the first land mass in the US that will go steadily under water if the ocean rises.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 01:58 PM
link   
a reply to: marg6043

Yeah I know about 10k years ago it looked pretty close to what it is now, but before that there was a lot more land.



And long before that there was a lot less land.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 02:02 PM
link   

originally posted by: marg6043
a reply to: Grimpachi

Florida is more of a build up of sediment than a land mass, the shape Florida have today was finally acquired about 10,000 years ago, at the end of the last ice age.

So in my views Florida will be one of the first land mass in the US that will go steadily under water if the ocean rises.


Florida is mainly if not totally made from coral,and from memory the highest part of it is just 200 feet above sea level.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 02:16 PM
link   
a reply to: Grimpachi

If I was living in Florida I will be very worry about the ocean rise, because is going to be under water very fast, Florida has been call the "fantasy land" where real state is over priced and one city that will suffer the most is Miami and most of the southern part of the state.


South Florida has two big problems. The first is its remarkably flat topography. Half the area that surrounds Miami is less than five feet above sea level. Its highest natural elevation, a limestone ridge that runs from Palm Beach to just south of the city, averages a scant 12 feet. With just three feet of sea-level rise, more than a third of southern Florida will vanish; at six feet, more than half will be gone; if the seas rise 12 feet, South Florida will be little more than an isolated archipelago surrounded by abandoned buildings and crumbling overpasses. And the waters won’t just come in from the east – because the region is so flat, rising seas will come in nearly as fast from the west too, through the Everglades.

Even worse, South Florida sits above a vast and porous limestone plateau. “Imagine Swiss cheese, and you’ll have a pretty good idea what the rock under southern Florida looks like,” says Glenn Landers, a senior engineer at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. This means water moves around easily – it seeps into yards at high tide, bubbles up on golf courses, flows through underground caverns, corrodes building foundations from below. “Conventional sea walls and barriers are not effective here,” says Robert Daoust, an ecologist at ARCADIS, a Dutch firm that specializes in engineering solutions to rising seas.


Topography will play a big role in many cities around the nation as the sea levels rises.

Rather than government preparedness to what is obviously a very real doom scenario you only hear about creating a global warming scam.

thinkprogress.org...



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 02:19 PM
link   
a reply to: Imagewerx

That will be in the part of the state closes to the GA border, but the southern part is a scan 12 feet. Just a minimal raise of waters and southern Florida will become divided waterways.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 02:26 PM
link   
a reply to: marg6043

I already live in Florida I just hate the area where I live. I have already put my house on the market and plan on moving back to Brevard county. Another 10 years here then I am leaving the country. Things just need to stay stable for a while longer.



Once sea level starts eradicating Florida lands it will not matter where people are living in the US because the millions of displaced people will change every facet of life.

BTW I am buying a big sailboat and leaving the US on it. Not because of rising sea level, but because that has always been my retirement dream.




top topics



 
24
<< 5  6  7    9 >>

log in

join