It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Big computer and internet probs?

page: 3
3
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 11:39 PM
link   

originally posted by: Aazadan

Forgive me for saying this as I seem to be implying several times that you're a tech dummy but, are you sure your computer is even turned on? There are three switches you need on in order to power your computer. The first is the switch on the UPS. The second is the switch on the power supply. The third is the power button on your computer. If the power supply switch is flipped to off, the computer will never boot up. When you take it into your technician, he is going to flip that switch on, and when he hands it back to you for safety reasons he's going to flip that power supply switch off.


I am a tech dummy, but less so than most of the non-tech people I know. But I am smart enough to get the switches the right way up, down, sideways whatever they should be and I check over everything over and over and just mysterious behavior from hardware.




posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 11:41 PM
link   

originally posted by: Jed Stuart
I am sure that is good advice. I had set up Ubuntu and was sorting out problems in getting the internet connection working and then the power button not working problem happened, the same problem another computer had which fixed itself when I took it to a technician, who then found nothing wrong with the computer and which went faulty again when I got it home.


The power button works by sending a constant 5V stream to the hardware, even when it's turned off (the same is true of your TV and other devices). In fact, the best way to discharge the system when the power is turned off is to hold the power button in for 5 seconds, to cut down on the risk of shocks or damage to the system.

Anyways, the power button not working means that the 5V charge isn't getting to the power button so it can't tell the PSU to turn on. The first thing I would check is the power supply switch (typically on the back of a PSU it has a 0 and 1 on it), and make sure it's on. Then make sure the computer is plugged in, and that the PSU is getting power. If you have a voltmeter you can test all of these things easily.

When you turn your monitors on but the computer isn't turned on, what do they say? They shouldn't just be blank (atleast not initially).

At the technicians can you get the machine to initiate a series of POST codes by intentionally introducing errors?

Did you buy these computers off the shelf or put them together?

If you can get into the BIOS at the technicians, you should be able to easily look at voltage and make sure your 12, 8 (i think that's it), and 5 volt rails are within 10% of what they should be. Too much or too little power on each of these causes problems.
edit on 2-9-2015 by Aazadan because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 05:28 AM
link   
So when you went to the technichian, did it work for you there?



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 11:46 PM
link   

originally posted by: Aazadan

The power button works by sending a constant 5V stream to the hardware, even when it's turned off (the same is true of your TV and other devices).

Anyways, the power button not working means that the 5V charge isn't getting to the power button so it can't tell the PSU to turn on. The first thing I would check is the power supply switch (typically on the back of a PSU it has a 0 and 1 on it), and make sure it's on. Then make sure the computer is plugged in, and that the PSU is getting power. If you have a voltmeter you can test all of these things easily.

When you turn your monitors on but the computer isn't turned on, what do they say? They shouldn't just be blank (atleast not initially).

At the technicians can you get the machine to initiate a series of POST codes by intentionally introducing errors?

Did you buy these computers off the shelf or put them together?

If you can get into the BIOS at the technicians, you should be able to easily look at voltage and make sure your 12, 8 (i think that's it), and 5 volt rails are within 10% of what they should be. Too much or too little power on each of these causes problems.


Thanks for your suggestions there. I can't get to that yet though, as I have to get the UPS unit working first.

I bought all four computers, that no longer turn on, new. I have limited time to muck around with them after spending way too much time trying to get them going already, so it is public computers and getting on with trying to get things done there. for the moment. I decided to just slowly do one step at a time on the gear. So the UPS not working is number one. As often has happened the technician I took that to was scratching his head as to why it works for him and not me. I wasn't actually mentioning my problems with computers here in order to get tech assistance, although I will keep all suggestions for later reference. I have almost given up on getting any value from techs, but I should keep trying I suppose. Many over the years have been glad to see the back of me. Or, in the case of problems with Webmail escalate my issue to mysterious higher level people who then do not say anything. That happened four times with one provider and then I left.

The cord to the UPS is checked. The power supply is working other gear. The relay wont turn on for me. The tech did it four times and made sure that I heard the little click it makes. It does not make that click for me at home. The thing used to work with everything else set up the same. It is a PwerRite XP bought new probably 11 years ago. Perhaps there is a way to get it on without the relay being needed. I was ok putting a new battery in but would not fiddle with it other than that.



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 11:51 PM
link   

originally posted by: verschickter
So when you went to the technichian, did it work for you there?


That has happened twice now. One computer wouldn't turn on for me, but did for the tech and he found nothing wrong with it and charged me $100. The other thing was the UPS that worked for the tech and not me. I got that advice, about the thing making a click, when it engages for free. Usually of course it is going to cost me heaps to have something that is a bit strange investigated, so I am reluctant.



posted on Sep, 3 2015 @ 11:58 PM
link   
a reply to: Jed Stuart

Check your fuses. Your wall power outlets should be on a few circuits throughout your home, typically they'll have a max output between 1800 and 2400 volts per depending on the age of the home. That's for all items on that circuit not just a single outlet. If you're drawing more that that, you're going to have power issues, probably involving tripped circuit breakers.

So if your kitchen is on the same fuse as the wall outlet you're plugging your computer into you'll have to add up the power drain from your refrigerator, microwave, electric stove, and so on.

I should also add that computer power supplies get less efficient as time goes on, and begin drawing more power to provide the same power to the system. The average lifespan of a PSU is 20,000 hours but a small percentage will only reach even 1/10 of that (think of a bell curve here). Heat also temporarily reduces their efficiency. What this means is that if your computer is getting hot, it will draw more power to cool the system, but it also converts that power through the PSU at a lower efficiency, so you get an exponential increase in power taken from the wall outlet. This can trip a breaker if you were already close to the limit.



posted on Sep, 4 2015 @ 01:01 AM
link   
Some UPS will not work if you´ve no earth.
I ask myself, why UPS? So many power outages at your place?

a reply to: Aazadan
The situation you describe is rare. You can draw 18A on a 16A breaker for several hours before it trips. There are two mechanism, simply said one is thermal and it takes a while for it to snap and the other one is magnetic and for instant breaking when a huge surge occurs.

He wouldn´t get "power issues". I think you mean ampere, not volt.
Example: P = U * I
U = voltage (volt)
I = current (ampere)

230V*16A = 3600W
230V*10A = 2300W

If a circuit draws to much, the breaker opens / fuse melts after some(!) time.
What can happen is if you switch on several switched-mode power supplys at once (that´s the kind of PSU used in PCs) it can trip your fuse because of instant surge current. Those are capacitive PSUs so they surge a lot of power on power up.

A 16A B type will trip around 80A instant(!) surge.
A 16A C type will trip around 160A.

For example I´ve 3 machines(450-600W each), 5 monitors, a printer/FAX, sound system, networking gear and a makerbot2 running on a 16A B(3-5) circuit breaker. If I would hang them on one master/slave extension socket, the breaker would trip after master got turned on. One machine is always on, if I´d switch the two other machines on with the master/slave extension the breaker trips. If I turn them on seperatly, maximum surge current is not reached and I´m fine. In theory, I could switch to a 16A C breaker and would be fine turning on everything at once but there are other factors like length,cross-section, temperature and how the cable is installed on it´s way to the sockets.
edit on 4-9-2015 by verschickter because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 4 2015 @ 09:25 AM
link   

originally posted by: Jed Stuart

originally posted by: xoenneox


Norton Internet security

...stopped reading there.


I know an IT pro who says it is the best.

Sorry, I cannot agree(Norton is useless), but there's one more thing, Sir.

Multiple anitviruses, and/or antikeyloggers, antiwhatever software tends to make mess with system, when used concurently.

Maybe your defense setup is just wrong, then?

My advice: throw away EVERYTHING, norton, antikeloggers, etc, and just install Comodo internet security.
Then install ccleaner and make cleanup.
If you are still having problems, check that UPS, or wires in your place.
Check your machines' bios, if your computers power source keeps up, too( you know, 12v, 5,v 3.3v...)...aging power source may make computers behaving weird.
upd:
check your RAM - some bioses are setting up RAM values/FSB/RAM voltages incorrectly...you may need to set it MANUALLY then(bios).
edit on 4-9-2015 by xoenneox because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2015 @ 01:48 AM
link   

originally posted by: Aazadan
a reply to: Jed Stuart

Check your fuses. Your wall power outlets should be on a few circuits throughout your home, typically they'll have a max output between 1800 and 2400 volts per depending on the age of the home. That's for all items on that circuit not just a single outlet. If you're drawing more that that, you're going to have power issues, probably involving tripped circuit breakers.

So if your kitchen is on the same fuse as the wall outlet you're plugging your computer into you'll have to add up the power drain from your refrigerator, microwave, electric stove, and so on.

I should also add that computer power supplies get less efficient as time goes on, and begin drawing more power to provide the same power to the system. The average lifespan of a PSU is 20,000 hours but a small percentage will only reach even 1/10 of that (think of a bell curve here). Heat also temporarily reduces their efficiency. What this means is that if your computer is getting hot, it will draw more power to cool the system, but it also converts that power through the PSU at a lower efficiency, so you get an exponential increase in power taken from the wall outlet. This can trip a breaker if you were already close to the limit.

At present I don't have fuses. as far as I know the latronix inverter just has a circuit breaker. If the batteries can't deliver it cuts out. I make sure they don't get anywhere near that low. I only try one computer at a time and don't have other gear running. The load on the system is low. The computers havn't been used much. Probably at max 500 hours.



posted on Sep, 7 2015 @ 01:56 AM
link   

originally posted by: verschickter
Some UPS will not work if you´ve no earth.
I ask myself, why UPS? So many power outages at your place?


UPS at present because if I forget to keep checking the voltage of the 12V batteries, then the inverter will cut out the power and the UPS gives me time to shut down the computer. I havn't ever let that happen though. Although I did a few times with a DVD player, but it was ok. Previously I was on mains 240V power. However, the region where I live we tend to have quite a few outages, and people who don't have UPS can have damaged computers.



posted on Sep, 7 2015 @ 03:57 AM
link   
a reply to: Jed Stuart

So you have a battery backup system presumably? Have you checked earth already?



posted on Sep, 7 2015 @ 10:05 AM
link   
a reply to: verschickter

Interesting info, I'm no electrician. The extent of my knowledge on that subject is that he could be having too much on the same circuit and overloading it which is all I was trying to rule out.



posted on Sep, 7 2015 @ 12:10 PM
link   
a reply to: Aazadan
No problem, most people do not know this.

There are three things that could happen with overloading, it´s not the right term but I struggle to remember the translation.

1) The fuses are not calculated properly and the wire melts down. This will result in leaking currents when the isolation is damaged slightly. The fuse will hold but if you´ve got an RCD (residual current device) it will detect this because it measures the total current flowing in and out, if there is a difference above the RCDs tripping level (30mA for private homes) it will trip and wont let you switch it on again. If the isolation is damaged severly, there can be short circuits (this means Phase and Neutral are connected without much resistance) or a ground fault (Phase and Ground/Earth is connected). If this happens, cards are open if the RCD or the fuse is faster. They can trip together, too.

2) Slight overload. When you have a automatic fuse that you can reset, you can draw more than the fuse is designed for a longer time until the thermal "sensor" trips. Melting fuses have a shorter tolerance time, it all depends how much current you put on top of the designed melting current.

3) Instant overload. The magnetic "sensor" is activated and it trips. You wont be able to switch it back on, until the fault is fixed. You will get a "fop" everytime you try to switch it on because the automatic fuse is the only place where an arc can jump over if the fault is steady, because at that time it´s the only place where the circuit is physically open.

Be aware, a fuse is not to protect you in first place, it protects the wires from being damaged, to avoid fires, ultimately protecting you again.



posted on Sep, 9 2015 @ 01:59 AM
link   

originally posted by: verschickter
a reply to: Jed Stuart

So you have a battery backup system presumably? Have you checked earth already?


Yes, the UPS is my battery backup. The system is definitely not overloading. There is an earth, but I have not checked it. It is still connected, but the wire might be cut where I can't see it. I had that happen once with my landline, so I can't rule out faulty earth preventing the UPS turning on. I have a basic meter. How do I check the earth?

It might seem that I am determined to find all things that go wrong are being caused by being targeted. It is easy to come to such a conclusion with so much targeting happening. The stories about computers and the internet are only one of many aspects of this evil program. For example I get a lot of harassment on the roads, including playing chicken. At first most of it was tailgating and coming just a bit too close from the other direction. But that escalated to almost accidents on other occasions and people making it very clear they are after me, glaring straight at me as they pass and finger guns etc etc. Fixing the UPS is the next step on getting the gear working but there are 20 other things more important to get done just to survive the constant assaults, so be patient if you want to stay and assist on the computer front.



posted on Sep, 9 2015 @ 08:07 AM
link   

originally posted by: Jed Stuart

originally posted by: verschickter
Some UPS will not work if you´ve no earth.
I ask myself, why UPS? So many power outages at your place?


UPS at present because if I forget to keep checking the voltage of the 12V batteries, then the inverter will cut out the power and the UPS gives me time to shut down the computer. I havn't ever let that happen though. Although I did a few times with a DVD player, but it was ok. Previously I was on mains 240V power. However, the region where I live we tend to have quite a few outages, and people who don't have UPS can have damaged computers.

You know what?
You do not need advices, you know better.
GL.



posted on Sep, 9 2015 @ 09:18 AM
link   

originally posted by: Jed Stuart
Yes, the UPS is my battery backup. The system is definitely not overloading. There is an earth, but I have not checked it. It is still connected, but the wire might be cut where I can't see it. I had that happen once with my landline, so I can't rule out faulty earth preventing the UPS turning on. I have a basic meter. How do I check the earth?


For you, I recommend something like this:
www.voelkner.de...
It will keep you alive ;-)



posted on Sep, 22 2015 @ 10:04 PM
link   
I solved the UPS not turning on problem. I didn't change it, but the setting on the inverter, which determines when it switches from standby to on was changed. Turning the UPS on was no longer enough to get the inverter to kick into gear. I discovered this by switching a light on first, which got the inverter on, and then turning the UPS on and it worked normally. On to the next problem.




top topics



 
3
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join