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Big computer and internet probs?

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posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 04:12 AM
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a reply to: ChiefD
I seriously doubt that´s how it went down with the guy.
Do you have a name to that documentary? The easiest way to explain why I can´t believe this:

Because electrons will go the easiest route in terms of resistance between two potentials. They wont flow through the circuit of that appliance either if there was any potential in one hand(remember that) between it to begin with. That would not happen because he´d short out his own potential all the time thuss no potential build.
Leaving aside all the other reasons why this just wont work.

Now for people being able to touch live mains without getting hurt, that´s anothe shoe.




posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 09:21 AM
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Do you have unusually high power bills?
You may have issue with your wiring.
Also, again - never, EVER use multiple antivirus/antikeylogger/antispy software that runs in background.
I can assure you, that it WILL lead to unusual issues(concurrent/unpredictable behaviour as a result WILL occur).
IT guy, 18 years of practise(practiCe?).

Sorry for my english.
edit on 2-9-2015 by xoenneox because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 12:02 PM
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a reply to: xoenneox
There has to be something else, too, with all those hardware issues.
It would be nice if JedStuart would respond to some replies here, now I´m curious to find out the reasons.

@JedStuart
Sharing anekdotes is all fine and good but it doesn´t help the cause.
The first thing to do obviously is to check the installation. It would be good invested money in my eyes.
I mean if you have the money to let four brand new machines covering dust, an E-Check is a drop on a hot stone in terms of cost.

It takes seconds to check the socket with a Fluke 1651B for example. Heavy priced but normally every electrican has a tester like this. It´s law to check all values after a fresh installation or change for RCD(delta S, delta I, U(touch)), R(earth), R(iso), Loop impedance Z, U(mains), U(N-PE), U(L-N), U(L-PE). Check if selectivity of fuses is given(has nothing to do with this) You´ll get a protocol with all those values.

Value descriptors are rougly translated, don´t know the english equivalents.

Problems with static through carpets for example can be fixed with a copper band on the floor before the carpet is glued onto it, connected with direct earth. That´s done in offices to prevent ESD damage.



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 07:27 PM
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a reply to: Jed Stuart

I'm not an IT person with years of experience like the others that replied, but I know a good bit about computers, have a couple (useless like A+) certifications, and have taken several IT courses. Maybe I can help.

First, I wouldn't start off by thinking that anyone is out to get you.

So the first thing I'm going to bring up is your electrical wiring. This can cause your computer to behave erratically, even with a UPS. Other things that could be causing the problem would be creating an electrical short once the computer is already turned on, such as what happens if the motherboard makes contact with the chassis outside of the mounting brackets.

Another cause could be your power supply, if you're using some hardware that requires a lot of power but you're using a power supply with insufficient wattage you could be causing system issues under heavy load.

Yet another cause could be heat. You mentioned not having problems when you took your PC to the repair place but that usually involves leaving the PC on for a short amount of time in a well ventilated area.

If your PC is confined and it can't effectively exhaust heat (assuming you're on an air cooled system) your system could be overheating. Note that this can also cause secondary power issues by making the fans work harder, which drains more power, which could be making your power supply insufficient.

For another issue, are you sure it's your computer that's turning off? To someone who may be lacking some tech skills a monitor that's switched off, or that otherwise isn't getting a display signal could just as easily look like the computer isn't on.

Taking your example of the computer crashing and needing a reboot when you tried to register your business, what exactly was happening? Typically when a Windows computer crashes it blue screens (well these days it just auto reboots unless you change some settings) but it sounds like you were able to continue to use it and later decide to reboot. Was your issue an actual OS crash or was it something more along the lines of _javascript crashing in your browser? For that matter, when you describe a crash, what actually happens? You mentioned using public computers, but on a public computer it's conceivable that _javascript has been disabled by the system administrations which would prevent your computer from running client side scripts that may be used in the registration process. It's also conceivable the public system was doing something like blocking port 25 to prevent certain mail connections.

Now lets talk about your sound, you mention that muting the sound doesn't work properly and things mute/unmute. Playing sound acts as a multiplier of 3 sound settings for example if one sound is playing at 50%, one at 50%, and one at 0% your total sound volume will be 0% but if they're playing at 50%, 50%, and 100% your volume will be 25%. First you have the applications sound volume, this is stored individually for every single program and the settings aren't always saved from session to session (news websites with auto playing video are really bad with this). Next you have the system sound which is the little sound icon on your (I'm assuming) Windows taskbar. Last you have your speaker volume which is hardware controlled. Most hardware speakers will automute if you plug in headphones and pump the sound through them instead. My first suspicion is that you mute the sound in a program, think it's muted on your system, and are then surprised when another program plays sound.

Next come word processing delays are indicative of cpu lag. In your OS there's what is called a key buffer, it stores a certain amount of input at a time and is periodically emptied putting all items in that buffer to the application. If your CPU usage is high or your available memory is low (low memory leading to swap file usage which eats up a lot of cpu time among other delays) the buffer won't be emptied often enough and you'll experience delays. I actually run into this issue on ATS with my netbook, because ATS has some scripts that utilize a lot of CPU resources and my netbook has weak hardware.

When it comes to your saved work issue, my suspicion is that you're saving to different directories, if I were troubleshooting your computer this is what I would check first. I bet that you've made several documents folders and are saving to different ones. You bring up that you also save things with different names, that tips me off that your file organization structure is probably a mess and you can't find what you're trying to work on.

With your web browser issues where my mind first goes is that you're visiting some less than trustworthy websites that are running browser hijacks, or perhaps you're going to old url's and the site is redirecting. If the old url no longer supports the redirect it will just hang.

When your passwords don't work, check your caps lock first of all. Most password inputs these days mask input with asterisks so that you can't see the letters. If caps lock is on your password won't match since they're case sensitive. Text messages sometimes arrive late because that's how they work. I'll spare you all of the lengthy hardware explanations but text messages are processed by spare cpu resources, and bandwidth that is already allocated to the cell phones (this is also why they're 140 characters, that's the empty room in the packet). You also may not be remembering your password correctly.

On captcha, I know a bit about them technically as I've written my own before. The popular ones like recaptcha actually don't check both words. They're used as a way to digitally verify words that are hard to read (this is why you usually have trouble with one word) and they work on the principal that if the person gives the easy word correctly, they're making an honest attempt at the hard word. After many submissions of the hard word, the computer can make a valid guess at what it is. This is used to automatically digitize books.

On the webmail service, it sounds to me like gmail was preventing an email script from running, and your other email client isn't. This is probably a big cause of your computer problems. An email service with no security settings is never going to error on you.



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 07:27 PM
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a reply to: Jed Stuart

Part 2:

I covered the delayed SMS messages but email may just be getting rejected, particularly so if you have a browser hijack that is constantly infecting the emails you send (and you keep the same computing habits reinfecting yourself). Read receipts aren't something you should be using a third party for, they're actually a standard feature of better email clients, you can get them in gmail for example, and there's also browser plugins which do it. Readnotify is offering a service that has no point which means they're doing something else with their read receipts to make it profitable to them. If email isn't sending in general you may be blocking the ports it uses in your router. POP3 uses 110 and 995, IMAP uses 143 and 993, and SMTP uses 25, 2525, and 465.

If work is being altered while you type it, I would suspect a virus that's looking at your content and replacing certain words or strings with it's own.

With your website statistics, I would first be looking at an implementation of sketchy SEO practices. Google will penalize websites if they're found to be creating fraudulent page views, and they take the fraud away from the stats. This doesn't happen in real time, so you'll see initial views only for them to be taken away later. Facebook does the same thing.

Never run an anti keylogger, first of all you can't prove you're being keylogged and second of all if you are anyone who is programming such a thing competently will be able to get around it.

With the on screen interference, this is known as artifacting and is indicative of a faulty video card. Eventually the errors will compound and lead to your computer freezing or rebooting. This isn't to be confused with a dead pixel on a monitor, which it sounds like you have. Just about every led or lcd screen will have some dead pixels, it's an average of 2-3 per display at 1920x1080 and as many as 12 is considered acceptable in quality control. If the screen is rapidly changing (new video inputs opposed to just displaying the same thing over and over) your video card will error faster as it eventually hits the faulty block of memory.

Your modem and wireless signals suggest to me that you have something that's disabling your network services in Windows, likely a virus. However cordless phones operating on 2.4 ghz or lower frequencies will cause interruption as will other wireless signals on the same channel. I'll save you the technical explanation but the wireless frequency is super crowded and there's a lot of overlap between devices and this can weaken/block signals. If you're on a laptop, by default the wireless card is turned off after x minutes of inactivity on battery power as a power saving measure. But you can change this setting.

Also, I glossed over it and others already mentioned it but you shouldn't be mixing anti virus programs. Not only do they eat up all of your computer resources (which can lead to some of these issues you mentioned) but they actually prevent each other from working which makes you more vulnerable. If you have to use one, stick to one. I use Microsoft Security Essentials myself.



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 07:35 PM
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I might add, using Norton *anything* is asking for trouble. It's banned at work, mostly due to eating up far too many cycles and making the system unstable.



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 07:52 PM
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a reply to: Jed Stuart

Hi.
A weird phenomenon i've discovered about a friend...can make electronics act funky without intending to.

I play with electronics, so I put the two leads of a digital multimeter on my fingers, and my friends' fingers to gauge any similarities/differences.

My friends' reading was almost a 1/4 volt higher than my own...don't know about any static charge that would cause the difference...

dull story shortened,

So, I wonder if things just act funky because you have a higher reading...







posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 10:57 PM
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originally posted by: verschickter
a reply to: Jed Stuart
Like I said, ask an electrician to check the earth potential in your house.



I have had the same problems in eleven homes now. I have had to move around a lot being a tenant. If I was just planted in one spot I would definitely look at such a possibility. I have done a lot of sharing with others in those homes and none of the others living there have had the same sorts of probs as me, so that makes that explanation seem not worth looking into.



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 11:01 PM
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originally posted by: ChiefD
a reply to: Jed Stuart

I agree with the posters who mention possible higher concentration of static electricity in your own body. I could see where that would wreak havoc on just about anything that plugs in or runs on batteries.



I already told you why I think that is not the case. If it was I would not be able to regularly be working on public computers with very few hardware problems, and using an ATM, mobile phone, etc.



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 11:02 PM
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originally posted by: xoenneox


Norton Internet security

...stopped reading there.


I know an IT pro who says it is the best.



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 11:14 PM
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originally posted by: verschickter
a reply to: xoenneox
There has to be something else, too, with all those hardware issues.
It would be nice if JedStuart would respond to some replies here, now I´m curious to find out the reasons.



It is rather irrelevant as I am a long way from getting my home office set up, and don't have much internet access time to read and reply. Apologies for not giving your considerable efforts to assist me not much response. At present the home office project is stuck on getting the UPS unit working. I got it a new battery but it does not turn on when the power is connected. The relay that responds perfectly for the technician does not when I get it home. There is no point in taking it to the tech again as it works for him. The power supply seems ok as it works other equipment, as does the power cord. I don't want to buy another UPS as so many things I have bought new have stopped working properly soon after I get them. So the hardware probs are on the back burner and getting the internet on public computers working better is the focus. Just an hour ago I was working on a computer in an online document that kept freezing up. It is intensely frustrating, especially as others working in that office are not having these sorts of problems.



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 11:18 PM
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What if you put a computer upstream of your working computer? A computer that watches the incoming internet traffic and maybe the power levels levels and ambient EMF.

Some times my computer downloads several gigs of some thing, I assume it is Windows, but the computer never says. The Task manager shows 2 to 4 MB per sec download with no programs active.

I hope its not Hilary's emails.



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 11:20 PM
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originally posted by: Jed Stuart
I know an IT pro who says it is the best.


Norton has a bad reputation, and not all of it is deserved however they aren't what I would consider a good product. Microsoft Security Essentials being free is the best option, it's also published by the same people who make the OS so you get a bit of an optimizing (plus MS is in general full of competent programmers and engineers). When I last looked at the stats a couple years ago, it carried the lowest overhead too.

All of this is to say, if you have the computer skills I would recommend you just use Linux. It's much harder to screw with a person on Linux due to the lower market share, so less malware is aimed at them. But if you're taking your computer into a diagnostic center, you're not really the type of person Linux is aimed at.

Anything really sensitive that might be getting peoples attention should be done through a laptop booting off of a Tails CD (finalized to prevent any more writing to it), while using a proxy service from a public wifi spot, and going through TOR nodes, and from there distributing documents worldwide via torrent.



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 11:23 PM
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originally posted by: Aazadan
a reply to: Jed Stuart

Now lets talk about your sound, you mention that muting the sound doesn't work properly and things mute/unmute. Playing sound acts as a multiplier of 3 sound settings for example if one sound is playing at 50%, one at 50%, and one at 0% your total sound volume will be 0% but if they're playing at 50%, 50%, and 100% your volume will be 25%. First you have the applications sound volume, this is stored individually for every single program and the settings aren't always saved from session to session (news websites with auto playing video are really bad with this). Next you have the system sound which is the little sound icon on your (I'm assuming) Windows taskbar. Last you have your speaker volume which is hardware controlled. Most hardware speakers will automute if you plug in headphones and pump the sound through them instead. My first suspicion is that you mute the sound in a program, think it's muted on your system, and are then surprised when another program plays sound.



I am just using the Windows task bar sound icon. Sound often turns on when going to a site with something involving a sound track but without actually turning that on. I will then go to the icon to mute it and that will succeed, but then a bit later it will turn back on. I am not going anywhere near any of the other sound control things.



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 11:25 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

I read that the Department of Defense or The NSA contributed to the Linux Kernal way back like version 2.0 or 4.0, or maybe the first one.

Do you know if that is still in there? Does DoD or NSA update it?

Just wondering.



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 11:26 PM
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originally posted by: Jed Stuart
It is rather irrelevant as I am a long way from getting my home office set up, and don't have much internet access time to read and reply. Apologies for not giving your considerable efforts to assist me not much response. At present the home office project is stuck on getting the UPS unit working. I got it a new battery but it does not turn on when the power is connected. The relay that responds perfectly for the technician does not when I get it home. There is no point in taking it to the tech again as it works for him. The power supply seems ok as it works other equipment, as does the power cord. I don't want to buy another UPS as so many things I have bought new have stopped working properly soon after I get them. So the hardware probs are on the back burner and getting the internet on public computers working better is the focus. Just an hour ago I was working on a computer in an online document that kept freezing up. It is intensely frustrating, especially as others working in that office are not having these sorts of problems.


Forgive me for saying this as I seem to be implying several times that you're a tech dummy but, are you sure your computer is even turned on? There are three switches you need on in order to power your computer. The first is the switch on the UPS. The second is the switch on the power supply. The third is the power button on your computer. If the power supply switch is flipped to off, the computer will never boot up. When you take it into your technician, he is going to flip that switch on, and when he hands it back to you for safety reasons he's going to flip that power supply switch off.



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 11:29 PM
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originally posted by: Jed Stuart
I am just using the Windows task bar sound icon. Sound often turns on when going to a site with something involving a sound track but without actually turning that on. I will then go to the icon to mute it and that will succeed, but then a bit later it will turn back on. I am not going anywhere near any of the other sound control things.


Would you mind posting a link to the model of keyboard you have? (or laptop if that's what you have) certain keyboards can control windows volume from keypresses and you may be turning that on. It's a feature of nearly all laptop keyboards and many others.

Edit: After a brief look, Windows does have the option to allow an application to take exclusive control over a device, this could allow the application to reset your volume levels, though that's not a behavior I've ever run into (apparently I have that setting on). You may want to try disabling that (sound, properties, uncheck it) but I'm not sure what that will do to your sound quality.
edit on 2-9-2015 by Aazadan because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 11:31 PM
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originally posted by: Semicollegiate
a reply to: Aazadan

I read that the Department of Defense or The NSA contributed to the Linux Kernal way back like version 2.0 or 4.0, or maybe the first one.

Do you know if that is still in there? Does DoD or NSA update it?

Just wondering.



I don't know if DoD or NSA updates Linux, I don't think they do. The great thing about Linux though, provided you pick a good build is that it's all open source. No one can insert their own malicious code in without getting it past the eyes of an entire community of very good programmers.



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 11:34 PM
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originally posted by: Aazadan

originally posted by: Jed Stuart
I know an IT pro who says it is the best.


All of this is to say, if you have the computer skills I would recommend you just use Linux. It's much harder to screw with a person on Linux due to the lower market share, so less malware is aimed at them. But if you're taking your computer into a diagnostic center, you're not really the type of person Linux is aimed at.

I am sure that is good advice. I had set up Ubuntu and was sorting out problems in getting the internet connection working and then the power button not working problem happened, the same problem another computer had which fixed itself when I took it to a technician, who then found nothing wrong with the computer and which went faulty again when I got it home.



posted on Sep, 2 2015 @ 11:36 PM
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I had a boss that couldn't wear digital watches. She claimed that they would all stop working within a few weeks.

...

Maybe this guy needs to stop using Windows and switch to OSX...



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