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Cartels Have Settled 80 Miles Inside the U.S. Border on Public Lands

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posted on Aug, 21 2015 @ 11:41 AM
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a reply to: xuenchen

Another lost cause.




posted on Aug, 21 2015 @ 12:00 PM
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I wonder how much "wall" one could buy for the price of a armed drone and operators/support crew?

Nah lets fly armed drones over US soil instead.

I feel a bit like the guy who spotted the iceberg when the titanic sank.



posted on Aug, 21 2015 @ 05:05 PM
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originally posted by: TrappedPrincess
No need to ask why this is happening, most of us already know the answer and it is glaringly obvious. The cartels have government officials bought and paid for at the highest level. No brainer really because anyone who actually cared about America and Americans would have put a stop to this long ago.

Big business and business as usual, nothing to see here. I remember awhile back there was a thread about how HSBC (major financial institution) got caught laundering money for the cartels. Caught red handed and do you think anyone went to Jail? Of course not they paid a fine and it was swept cleanly under the rug just like most truly important issues that we should be focusing on.


The cartels are very powerful. The fact is the US paid the Sinaloa's to police our border for us, in exchange for them keeping out the people we REALLY want to keep out, they get control of the border, can charge people to smuggle them in, and can bring in x drugs/year. The Sinaloa's have the largest border with the US, we probably made a similar deal with the Zeta's and others.

Lets put the cartel problem in perspective though: They're better armed and better funded than most world governments, they control more territory in Mexico than the Mexican government does, they have bought their way into US courts, and US officials are terrified of these guys. Also, the US cannot take the offensive on this. Because of their control over the Mexican government the US cannot get permission to move into Mexico and fight them on their soil and under Posse Comitatus we cannot fight them on our soil. It is a huge problem, and the reason you can tell it's huge and currently unfixable is that news of how large the problem is occasionally pops up like the Sinaloa member who testified he had an immunity deal with the CIA, or the banks launder all their money, and the news just goes away. No one wants to admit what's going on, but what can we do?

Do we cease recognizing Mexico as a state and run an armed invasion of what is on paper an ally? That sounds like an international clusterf*, and we pretty much blew our credibility in taking that type of action with Iraq.

This actually results in one of the best arguments for legalization. The cartels need to operate in the shadows, they can't actually compete in an above board business because they rely on violence rather than efficiency. If we make all of their products legal and start better funding treatment centers we can eliminate the black market profits and get rid of their influence.
edit on 21-8-2015 by Aazadan because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 22 2015 @ 08:31 AM
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originally posted by: Aazadan

originally posted by: TrappedPrincess
No need to ask why this is happening, most of us already know the answer and it is glaringly obvious. The cartels have government officials bought and paid for at the highest level. No brainer really because anyone who actually cared about America and Americans would have put a stop to this long ago.

Big business and business as usual, nothing to see here. I remember awhile back there was a thread about how HSBC (major financial institution) got caught laundering money for the cartels. Caught red handed and do you think anyone went to Jail? Of course not they paid a fine and it was swept cleanly under the rug just like most truly important issues that we should be focusing on.


The cartels are very powerful. The fact is the US paid the Sinaloa's to police our border for us, in exchange for them keeping out the people we REALLY want to keep out, they get control of the border, can charge people to smuggle them in, and can bring in x drugs/year. The Sinaloa's have the largest border with the US, we probably made a similar deal with the Zeta's and others.

Lets put the cartel problem in perspective though: They're better armed and better funded than most world governments, they control more territory in Mexico than the Mexican government does, they have bought their way into US courts, and US officials are terrified of these guys. Also, the US cannot take the offensive on this. Because of their control over the Mexican government the US cannot get permission to move into Mexico and fight them on their soil and under Posse Comitatus we cannot fight them on our soil. It is a huge problem, and the reason you can tell it's huge and currently unfixable is that news of how large the problem is occasionally pops up like the Sinaloa member who testified he had an immunity deal with the CIA, or the banks launder all their money, and the news just goes away. No one wants to admit what's going on, but what can we do?

Do we cease recognizing Mexico as a state and run an armed invasion of what is on paper an ally? That sounds like an international clusterf*, and we pretty much blew our credibility in taking that type of action with Iraq.

This actually results in one of the best arguments for legalization. The cartels need to operate in the shadows, they can't actually compete in an above board business because they rely on violence rather than efficiency. If we make all of their products legal and start better funding treatment centers we can eliminate the black market profits and get rid of their influence.


This is exactly what we do, the time for being all PC and the world's "saviour" is over. No more Mr Nice Guy, we go in and steam roll then rebuild. You think I'm joking or cruel I'm sure but let me tell you this, I would rather have leadership that was honest and said "Hey we are about to do some very bad things but it is best for the long run and overall picture. Their exists a threat that needs to be dealt with but cannot be dealt with under the old way of doing things. Any questions?"

I'm good with that as opposed to being all cuddles and hugs and pretending like we "liberate" "assist" or whatever other silly spoon fed nonsense they currently tell us to justify their corrupt wars. Their cannot be peace without war, sorry to say. Somebody has to be the biggest, baddest guy on the block and enforce rules that protect everybody. With great power comes great responsibility. Mexico is a problem and dangerous to our way of life so we need to recalibrate that situation and the only way to do it is to be the bad guy. International laws and treaties, yeah riiiiiiight because those are "real" and apply to everyone or are adhered to by everyone.

Seems like these days we are the only ones playing by the rules and I've never much been a fan of rules anyway. That big @$$ cockroach in our kitchen needs to be stomped out of existence not fed and made a pet, dig?
edit on CDTSat, 22 Aug 2015 08:32:55 -0500amppAmerica/Chicago22-05:00Sat, 22 Aug 2015 08:32:55 -050032 by TrappedPrincess because: (no reason given)

edit on CDTSat, 22 Aug 2015 08:34:24 -0500amppAmerica/Chicago22-05:00Sat, 22 Aug 2015 08:34:24 -050034 by TrappedPrincess because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 22 2015 @ 08:50 AM
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a reply to: Aazadan

No they didn't. The DEA gave guns to Sinaloa (via Fast and Furious) in exchange for information about rival cartels (of which Zetas were of primary focus for Sinaloa....resulting in all the border violence). This is how Sinaloa goes from total obscurity to being the most powerful drug cartel on the planet (officially....unofficially its the CIA that is the largest).

www.businessinsider.com...

The evidence doesn't prove complicity between the US Government and Sinaloa. But it hints at it. And Sinaloa members and lawyers allege it.

But in a world where the CIA can be proven to be running the yay up from Columbia (read: Mayan Jaguar/Mayan Express ) combined with the Sinaloa's cooperation with Columbia and the snow blowing in from there....and you have the makings for the CIA running an OP through the DEA.

Sinaloa had nothing to do with border security. Sinaloa was the transit authority for the CIA's shipments of Columbian Gold.

This is why i keep pointing out: WE caused the turmoil in Mexico. WE ruined those peoples country. WE made them refugees. Then we spit on them when they come here for safe harbor. Its pretty despicable.

ETA: what makes me even more ashamed of my nation: we criminalize the very product that we have destroyed Mexico, Afghanistan, and Vietnam over. Addiction is a medical issue, and is seen as such by most of the civilized world. In America, its criminal in the most draconian sense. Our government provides the addictive substances that it imprisons people for. When addiction shouldn't be treated with prison, but rather with medical and psychological intervention.

Jesus Christ....why do we put up with this?!?!? It is almost impossible to comprehend how badly just about every citizen on this planet is being screwed by these people.

edit on 8/22/2015 by bigfatfurrytexan because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 22 2015 @ 02:49 PM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
No they didn't. The DEA gave guns to Sinaloa (via Fast and Furious) in exchange for information about rival cartels (of which Zetas were of primary focus for Sinaloa....resulting in all the border violence). This is how Sinaloa goes from total obscurity to being the most powerful drug cartel on the planet (officially....unofficially its the CIA that is the largest).


You don't cross the Mexican border anywhere without the blessing of the cartels. This means they've got it locked down, do you really think the US wouldn't be taking advantage of that to keep out the people we really want to keep out? Terrorists aren't crossing, and most of the immigrants who cross are law abiding. The majority of the law breaking comes from the cartel members who move everyone else.

But all of this goes back to the same question: How do we stop the cartels? Military action is near impossible and we're not going to get anywhere in the courts. Making drugs legal takes away some of their funding but not all of it, and that has costs associated with it as well.



posted on Aug, 22 2015 @ 03:20 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

"Locked down" = the Sinaloa has a stranglehold on human trafficking. Not sure that really speaks well of

To get in you pay a coyote. Its not like Sinaloa has a lock on the border. They own most of it....but there is a huge piece of Los Zetas territory from the Big Bend of Texas down through the Gulf. I've been to Piedras Negras in the last year or so, and its a pretty nice place. Zetas controlled, there has been some turf wars with Sinaloa because of their turf boundaries being right near there.

But that area that Zetas owns....borders what we Texans call "The Valley". This leads to quite a bit of Zeta control over Texas, as The Valley is the area where you start getting into McAllen, then the i35 corridor in Hill Country. All....pretty much Zeta. Our prisons...Texas Syndicate is the main ethnic gang for latinos. This is just our own wing of Los Zetas.

Sinaloa has a lot of power...no doubt. But they are far from having a lock on it. And without the DEA/CIA/ICE support? They are merely a waning moon.



posted on Aug, 22 2015 @ 03:24 PM
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Sounds like a job for the AZ guard unit.



posted on Aug, 22 2015 @ 03:28 PM
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Prohibition causes nothing but trouble for society.



posted on Aug, 22 2015 @ 03:38 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

That's why I said we probably have deals with all of them along the border, Zeta's, Sinaloas, and the rest. It's cheaper than building a wall.




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