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6 million U.S. residents are drinking uranium-contaminated groundwater

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posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 01:58 PM
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I'm pretty sure this article is addressing nitrates in fertilizers that are freeing the radioactive compounds from the soils and rocks. When you add nitrates to soils it actually can increase the export of ions from the soil, which can possibly lead to this. Nitrogen boosts plant growth by boosting energy.

I suppose the same basic principles of nature can lead to the release of the radioactive elements. Bananas often have radioactivity and so do potatoes sometimes. Usually that is in a radioactive potassium salt though. I suppose the nitrogen in the fertilizer somehow makes this more possible.

I'm speculating on some of this, kind of thinking outloud trying to work out the relationship with known things containing radioactive properties. I'm not afraid of potatoes and bananas are all right as long as I don't eat them the same day I eat potatoes or tomatoes. That is a whole other cross reactivity issue though....or is it. Potatoes and tomatoes are high nitrogen foods.




posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 02:24 PM
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a reply to: Chickensalad

Agreed, amazing how many people had to have their thyroid removed over the past couple decades. A quarter of the population back home is running around town with a two inch scar on their throat.



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 03:13 PM
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The only thing i see here is BS.

The central valley of calif is ringed with granite mountains..

Some granites contain around 10 to 20 parts per million (ppm) of uranium.

As these mountain erode the uranium is released.



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 03:26 PM
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originally posted by: Liquesence
a reply to: intrptr

Yes, I understand distillation. My point is it's not feasible for every single household to do this on a large scale, and not distilling 100% of the water that comes out of the ground.

Not sure the elevation of the bottom of the well. The general elevation of this town is around 890ft, this land is a little lower, and the well is 100 ft down plus 100ft deep.

And no, I've never tested it for everything.

I see, would be prohibitive to spend the money to test and retest the well water or filter it knowing the trace elements that get through anyway are the most harmful ones.

I live in megalopolis, I drink nothing but. Theres a water store nearby, they sell both kinds of 'pure' water. Without testing, I know the distilled variety is the cleanest on the planet. It costs me .7O cents a gallon.

The reason I asked about altitude is the higher up the mountain the cleaner the water. As clean as it can be in this age of pollutants.



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 03:29 PM
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originally posted by: ANNED
The only thing i see here is BS.

The central valley of calif is ringed with granite mountains..

Some granites contain around 10 to 20 parts per million (ppm) of uranium.

As these mountain erode the uranium is released.

Thats misleading. How many eons for the mountains to erode enough to contaminate the faucet in your house with that Uranium?

Millennia.



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 03:48 PM
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originally posted by: Chrisfishenstein
a reply to: intrptr

How about a link or proof of this...


Uranium is used in Fracking too, as a tracking agent.


Namely because I know this is false. (A tracking agent???) Why are you spewing this online? The poor poster below said New Jersey is high as well, show me where fracking takes place there as well...

This is not nice to scare people!

This is terrible news and all but no need to fill people's minds up with stuff that isn't true....Unless I am wrong?


Yah, not wrong… mistaken.

Wiki



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 04:50 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

I'm not really concerned with contamination of my own water, because there is very little industry or large scale agriculture around, and I have several stages of water filtration. Plus, this is semi-rural area. Testing it wouldn't hurt of course, just to know.

If I lived in or near one of the areas show on the map on the OP, then I would be highly concerned...and pissed.
edit on 19-8-2015 by Liquesence because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 04:52 PM
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originally posted by: warpig69
a reply to: Chickensalad

Agreed, amazing how many people had to have their thyroid removed over the past couple decades. A quarter of the population back home is running around town with a two inch scar on their throat.


Or worse. My mom's vocal cords never vibrated again after getting FIVE POUNDS of tissue including thyroid removed. She's not a big woman. It looked awful, but a goiter it wasnt. She now gets to spend the rest of her days with a traech.

According to the map, FC is white, but just to the south in Kansas, it's pretty damn red.

Where I live now is REALLY red



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 05:04 PM
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originally posted by: ANNED
The only thing i see here is BS.

The central valley of calif is ringed with granite mountains..

Some granites contain around 10 to 20 parts per million (ppm) of uranium.

As these mountain erode the uranium is released.



Your argument only makes sense if the contamination was confined to California. It's not.

But, for the sake of argument, let's assume you're correct (because, you know, granite is highly porous and erodes quickly, :/ ).

How do you explain ALL THE OTHER areas that are affected? Also, is it coincidence that the two areas with the biggest agricultural industries are showing the most effects? And the fact that there appears to be a DIRECT correlation between nitrate (which is used in fertilizer) levels and the uranium levels.

I guess it's all BS. And fuzzy science.



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 05:30 PM
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You also need to realize new jersey and pennsylvania have been farmed for hundreds of years look at the levels in the old ''breadbowl'' to get an idea on how much will appear in Cali. and the other agricultural regions



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 05:35 PM
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This made me look at my can of Guinness beside me in cautious fear.
Need a wold map of this.
Please Guinness, please don't contain this uranium. Let the red dots be somewhere else.



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 06:08 PM
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a reply to: Liquesence


If I lived in or near one of the areas show on the map on the OP, then I would be highly concerned…and pissed.

I live in Silicon Valley, the ground water here was polluted long ago by the chip making industry. People seem to have forgotten that.

Now its all about the drought and 'recycling'.

article



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 11:12 PM
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Very interesting thread.
All I know is... I live in an area with a lot of red and my dad worked for the cities water company for 30 years.
Some of my earliest memories are of him being super cautious about the water. We had a pretty intense filter system in the house I grew up in. Not to say we've ALWAYS had a uranium issue. But he obviously knew tap water wasn't the best choice. He will still absolutely not drink unfiltered tap water and sticks with Dasani bottled water.
He has never really said why. Just to keep on drinkin bottled water.

I don't really believe bottled water is too much better for us. But his paranoia about it has made me conscious about the water I consume over the years and I find myself drinking mostly bottled water.



posted on Aug, 20 2015 @ 12:28 AM
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Fortunately, the Japanese government during the Fukushima crisis found an elegant solution and I would be willing to bet that the EPA, crafty as they are, implements the same fix. They simply increased the maximum safe contaminant levels.



posted on Aug, 20 2015 @ 12:43 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: ANNED
The only thing i see here is BS.

The central valley of calif is ringed with granite mountains..

Some granites contain around 10 to 20 parts per million (ppm) of uranium.

As these mountain erode the uranium is released.

Thats misleading. How many eons for the mountains to erode enough to contaminate the faucet in your house with that Uranium?

Millennia.


Uranium is heavier then gold and there is a lot of gold in the northern central valley.

In the central and eastern part of the US the uranium would have come from the granite eroded from the canadian shield formation during the last ice age.
www.canadianshieldfoundation.ca...

So yes Millennia!!



posted on Aug, 20 2015 @ 05:45 AM
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a reply to: ANNED

Uranium is heavier then gold and there is a lot of gold in the northern central valley.

Cant' compare the two. Unless you can show me a Uranium nugget (not just ore) and all the maps where placer deposits have been found.
Not. Neither is Uranium coming out your faucet. Unless Fuku is changing that.

Point being its disingenuous to say Uranium is naturally occurring everywhere. Gold is in seawater too, (tons of it) but not enough quantity to warrant "mining" it.
edit on 20-8-2015 by intrptr because: additonal



posted on Aug, 27 2015 @ 01:00 AM
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My location is on the map. Looks to be more city wise or where more of the population is and not the surrounding farm areas that would contain the source of farming chemicals, wastes, etc., with nitrate linked to the uranium(as the source says). It's concentrated for some reason. Or maybe by river via Hanford. The level appears near as high as Hanford Wash. area and surrounding.
edit on 27-8-2015 by dreamingawake because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 27 2015 @ 01:14 AM
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My well water doesn't glow green under a blacklight..I'm Good



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