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British children among the saddest in the world.

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posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 04:56 AM
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A few days ago I was accused in a thread of suffering from little princess syndrome when I discussed the subject of bullying and pointed out how bad the UK can be institutionally from the school to the work place. I just wanted you to know that I was not exaggerating in any way. I have a keen sense for what is happening in my back yard.

Today there is an article in the Guardian,

English children among the unhappiest in the world at school due to bullying

that,


Violence and poor relationships with teachers puts English children 14th out of 15 countries surveyed for happiness at school as charity calls for action.


The report cited is by the Children's Society and University of York,


an international comparison of children’s happiness in 15 countries


based on,


a survey of 53,000 children aged 10 and 12 in England, Germany, Norway, South Korea, Poland, Estonia, Spain, Turkey, Romania, Algeria, South Africa, Israel, Ethiopia, Colombia and Nepal.


Britain come 11th. It is not a question of material resources in school either, but more one of quality and emotional security, as the study suggests.

There is a real link between bullying and mental ill health later in life. This costs the economy a great deal of money. We must find the root of the problem and deal with it at source. This would save a lot of money and perhaps prevent so much unhappiness and mental illness that ravages and may ruin so many lives.

edit on 19-8-2015 by Revolution9 because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 05:02 AM
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Sorry to say, but here in Japan, bulling sometimes leads to suicide. Big problem here.



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 05:02 AM
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a reply to: Revolution9

Yep, bullying is a problem alright. And these days it takes many forms. Standing up to the bully isn't as simple as it once was either - you'll likely become a victim of knife crime nowadays.



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 05:06 AM
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originally posted by: musicismagic
Sorry to say, but here in Japan, bulling sometimes leads to suicide. Big problem here.


Yes, I have heard about Japan. Here, too, there are suicides.

It is a bad sign for cultures if their young are committing suicide.

In Britain there is a very big problem with mental illness.

The better performing countries in the survey obviously have something to teach us. They show that there can be a solution if we have the will to change.



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 05:11 AM
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I always take these reports with a pinch of salt. It's more the British culture. Out of all the countries surveyed, Britain most likely has the highest quality of living standards, yet are least happy. We feel we deserve everything and that our opinion has substance. The bullying stems more from social media, and the culture of needing to be accepted by peers online. People commit suicide over people not commenting or liking pictures for christ sake.

Take into account poor diet, influx of immigrants and importance placed on social media acceptance I can agree that most spoilt kids are unhappy. They have nearly everything they need and don't realise or appreciate it. Bullying exists everywhere. Benchmark bullying is more prevelant in a society that provides all.

I would also say suicides in Japan often relate to family pressures exerted from family members expecting good grades. Alot of the bullying comes from the home. Then when they are bullied at school also they have no out...
edit on 19-8-2015 by rossacus because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 05:16 AM
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originally posted by: rossacus
I always take these reports with a pinch of salt. It's more the British culture. Out of all the countries surveyed, Britain most likely has the highest quality of living standards, yet are least happy. We feel we deserve everything and that our opinion has substance. The bullying stems more from social media, and the culture of needing to be accepted by peers online. People commit suicide over people not commenting or liking pictures for christ sake.

Take into account poor diet, influx of immigrants and importance placed on social media acceptance I can agree that most spoilt kids are unhappy. They have nearly everything they need and don't realise or appreciate it. Bullying exists everywhere. Benchmark bullying is more prevelant in a society that provides all.

I would also say suicides in Japan often relate to family pressures exerted from family members expecting good grades. Alot of the bullying comes from the home. Then when they are bullied at school also they have no out...


I will have to politely disagree with you. It is a very big problem. I notice it with no need of a study or survey. The study is very accurate and institutionally we are letting our people down. You blame immigration and other factors. The study and I do not.

I have offered social science before your eyes that reveals a real problem. I hope people in high places who can make decisions get to appreciate the scale of this problem. It is clearly evident.



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 05:20 AM
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a reply to: Revolution9

I am guilty of the 'Little princess syndrome' but not for young children at school more for the generation that e.g. hogs the fast lane in a small, slow car whilst chatting to friends oblivious to the queue of people wanting to pass by quite legally within the speed limit and the current lot of celebrities I don't even need to name that the media puts up for our young girls to idolise. It seems to have come from the Thatcher era of parenting for some and was reinforced during the 90's parenting.

I was surprised at how badly our schools teach sex education when compared to countries like the Netherlands. A tv programme Sex in School was an absolute eye-opener and a much needed change is obvious and needed now - especially because of our pregnant school kids. The Dutch teach respect, knowing their bodies both sexes and not being embarrassed but able to communicate, especially about birth control. One English teacher said, she wouldn't dare teach sex in that way - but the Netherlands way certainly a way I would have chosen for my sons to learn, not the banana and durex manner they were taught at school by a blushing teacher.

We do need to change a lot about education in the UK because not only do we appear to have very unhappy kiddies but the level of education has dipped and been dipping since the 1960's. There is no excuse for it with the teaching aides available today and also the supply of help for the teacher in a class.

I do think immediately a bully is identified their parents should be sent for and made aware and, if necessary warned themselves if they appear to think its OK.

I do wonder though whether multiculturalism is not also something we are sweeping under the carpet with having to cope with so many different cultures, beliefs, PC with the English culture coming up last to be considered. It must affect the self confidence of our kids and their perceived identity. They should know they are not Crusaders however pride in our culture seems to be at a low ebb.

That report is just sad, especially as my Grandaughter starts school in September, I will be watching her closely along with her parents, we want her to enjoy school and do well, that report suggests that may not be the case. I also feel sorry for the kids today, even our graduates jobs are over subscribed and many are doing menial work regardless of their qualifications. The kiddies going through the system have pretty little to look forward to except job sharing by the look of things, regardless of how bright they are.



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 05:24 AM
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a reply to: Revolution9

Having been a victim of childhood bullying, to the point of having PTSD symptoms for at least four years after the end of my schooling, I can confirm that this is not a new trend, or indeed a particularly unexpected result. I am thirty years old now, and my son is in school, and dealing with certain aspects of school life which echo my past. Like I was, he is forced by the law to go to a place to be educated, a place in which he has no actionable right to self defence, lest he be seen as part of the problem, rather than its swift and righteous solution.

There has been a culture amongst teachers and the wider educational establishment, which holds that in instances of physical violence, it does not matter who started it.

I have news for the establishment here. It bloody well DOES matter.

I cannot speak for female pupils, since I am entirely ill equipped to comment on their experience, however, where male pupils are concerned, it is vitally important for their development and confidence, that if they are assaulted, and react to that assault in the proper, natural and normal way (i.e. to defend themselves physically) that they be supported by the authorities in their just defence of the self, and that those who attack others for no reason, be chastised on top of any stiff right to the jawbone they might receive for their trouble.

I cannot stress enough how much of a crushing effect it can have, to be assaulted by another pupil, to defend oneself, and then have that defence cause problems with the teaching staff and administration of the school. There must never be a situation where a child feels forced to endure assault without having the psychological freedom to respond to that assault. Furthermore, those who do attack others without provocation or reason, should be removed from school IMMEDIATELY! No appeals, no pandering to the needs of psychotic individuals, their idiot parents, or any of that rot, no school board decisions, and no local government interference, just immediate expulsion for the person who instigates a situation, and NO consequences for those who are under attack. None. Not even stern questioning.

The unbalanced foolishness with which physical violence related issues are treated by the British school system, is entrenched and has been allowed to be this way for decades, and it needs to change. From here on, those who start trouble, should not expect protection from their stupidity, and those under assault should be free to react to it without trouble being made for them. Kids in school have less rights than adults on the street. If I am attacked in the street and I defend myself, I have not committed an offence under the law, and I see no reason why it ought to be any different for a child in school, except that schools should do a better job of removing ill behaved individuals from having any contact with well adjusted individuals, and protect students from one another.

Most of the reason that teachers are not forming good bonds with their pupils have to do with the fact that they are forced to enforce arbitrary, and totally nonsensical rules and regulations pertaining to the behaviour of children, which have no focus on fault, and instead focus on whoever happens to be caught in an act which appears negative. Getting that sort of nonsense sorted would go a long way to fixing this issue, certainly for the male pupils.

As for the female pupils, I will leave that issue to someone with first hand experience.



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 05:24 AM
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a reply to: Revolution9
There are bullies everywhere in life and the only real solution is to stand up to them. Tough I know but standing up to them doesn't mean violence ensues. There are lots of ways to stand up to bullies it just means you have to pay a price, be that personal development or overcoming a fear.



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 05:30 AM
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a reply to: Shiloh7

Thank you for that worthy description.

I don't pretend to be any kind of authority. I am just sensitive to my environment and see it so clearly.

I honestly don't think it is too much to do with other cultures. I went to school with many different kids. They were the nicer ones in many ways.

I am in my late forties now so older like you. I have to carry a bit of a gauntlet for the mental health thing because it worries me greatly. What I have seen in my life among my peers is most shocking. I try to speak out about it because I saw so much unhappiness in adults that has come from childhood experience.

Every hope for the young people. I think we do need to look to those cultures who are getting this right and see if we can't learn a thing or two. I would swallow any cultural pride if another culture can help.



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 05:34 AM
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Interesting article, and a very harsh and sad conclusion to the study, but while it suggest that steps must be taken to get some awareness of the issue into the curriculum, what it doesn't get into is why there is the attitude toward bullying that there apparently is. Is there something in the culture that overlooks or allows it?



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 05:35 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

I'm sorry to hear you had a hard time. Me, too. My school was so violent. I was not brought up with my Mom either and my Grandma who cared for me died suddenly in my arms at a young age when I was 13. Needless to say I was drinking alcohol heavily and getting in trouble with the cops by age 15. I used to have to go to school drunk, lol, just to face it.

Luckily I am a bright chap and sorted my life out slowly. However, I see so clearly all the damage my childhood did to me.

Hey man. You take good care and I wish every happiness for your son, too.



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 05:36 AM
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Good thing there aren't many British Immigrants coming to other EU country's.



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 05:39 AM
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a reply to: Revolution9

Damn...

That's a harsh hand Revolution9. I am glad you came through it and are here with us, rather than in any of the myriad quagmires you could have fallen into on that path.



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 05:39 AM
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Im sure the peodo ruling elite take great pleasure in the unhappiness of our children. In the u.k you get more time for raping an adult than you do for raping a child.

Children in the u.k are mostly latch key kids. Both parents working if they are lucky enough to have 2 parents. Add on the pressure of social media, closing of youth clubs and the fear of going out caused by gang culture and groomers.
Sports are too expensive whether playing or spectating.
The c of e schools no longer teach a christian ethos and are more likely to sing bob marley songs than hymns.

Disregard.
edit on 19-8-2015 by disregard because: corrected by poster below,thankyou



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 05:46 AM
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Another "international" survey that is being used to support a worldview and therefore, the existence of the report's authors.

Here's the actual report that these conclusions are drawn from.

www.isciweb.org...

While I won't question the negative impact of bullying, but I will question the conclusion that South Korean kids are so much happier than English kids when they have such a high (and tragic) suicide rate.



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 05:48 AM
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originally posted by: disregard
Im sure the peodo ruling elite take great pleasure in the unhappiness of our children. In the u.k you get less time for raping an adult than you do for raping a child.

Children in the u.k are mostly latch key kids. Both parents working if they are lucky enough to have 2 parents. Add on the pressure of social media, closing of youth clubs and the fear of going out caused by gang culture and groomers.
Sports are too expensive whether playing or spectating.
The c of e schools no longer teach a christian ethos and are more likely to sing bob marley songs than hymns.

Disregard.


I think you meant get more time for raping an adult than a child, correct me if I'm wrong.

Well all that you say is true. How can I disagree when we read in the news the token sentences people like Rolf Harris get. The child abuse thing is mind blowing. A lot of that behaviour was learned in public school (see, school again) where the boys did not live with their parents and get proper emotional nurturing and instead where at the disposal of the bigger boys, equally as emotionally starved. Is it any wonder they became such monsters later in life?

I get so frustrated with the human race, really I do. We can go on playing the blame game, but that is really the laziest and least imaginative response. If only we could make the effort to deal with this. It starts in the schools. That is where it must stop. It is not just in the poor schools either. It is in the posh public schools, too. Like the study said, not a question of material resources as such.



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 05:49 AM
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In my experience schools do turn a blind eye or try to rationalize what potentially could be a very damaging situation for the victim. i too was bullied in my early school days, and it makes me think what can be done? how can this be prevented?

and IMHO it comes not down to punishment but education of both the bully and the victim.

As once i learnt about the sociology of a "bully", i also learnt how to deal with them my self. without any need from teachers, parents or "student Councilor"



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 05:53 AM
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originally posted by: paraphi
Another "international" survey that is being used to support a worldview and therefore, the existence of the report's authors.

Here's the actual report that these conclusions are drawn from.

www.isciweb.org...

While I won't question the negative impact of bullying, but I will question the conclusion that South Korean kids are so much happier than English kids when they have such a high (and tragic) suicide rate.


To be fair the Guardian reports that,


Overall, it concludes that children in England are unhappier with their lives than those in 13 other countries including Israel and South Africa, with only South Korea lagging behind.


So they did mention what you mention. Thanks for the link. I will download that and keep a copy. Respect.



posted on Aug, 19 2015 @ 05:56 AM
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originally posted by: AMNicks
In my experience schools do turn a blind eye or try to rationalize what potentially could be a very damaging situation for the victim. i too was bullied in my early school days, and it makes me think what can be done? how can this be prevented?

and IMHO it comes not down to punishment but education of both the bully and the victim.

As once i learnt about the sociology of a "bully", i also learnt how to deal with them my self. without any need from teachers, parents or "student Councilor"


Yes, you know I think that bullies are damaged kids in a sense, or certainly can be. They have not been brought up to value feelings and emotions. Sometimes emotionally starved at the very time they should not be.

Middle class and gentry parents can be equally guilty of that you see.




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