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Literature is Immortal Telepathy

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posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 08:04 PM
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Grab a book off your shelf. Open it unto a random page.

Now start reading.

Now, realize what just happened: For what transpired was a psychic feat of epic proportions--a mental exchange transcending the conventional laws of our material universe.

By opening that tome and reading those words, you just engaged in a one-sided telepathic communique with the author. And that literary missive arrived unto you despite all potential barriers of time and space.

Writing a book is literally encapsulating a portion of your mind into a singular medium that's tangible, reproducible--and most of all transferable. It enables enactment of an information download directly from your brain into the brains of your readers.

Reading a book, therefore, creates a unidirectional conduit between yourself and the mind of that author.

And that conduit exists regardless of discrepancies in physical distance or temporal space.

Open the bible and connect with minds from thousands of years hence.

Open the Chuang Tzu and interface with an intelligence far older.

Books have power. Literature conveys inestimable virtue.

And much can one tell about you by the things you read.

For not only do books offer you a conduit into the minds of their authors, the titles and information on your shelves offer a partial window into the corridors of your mind.

Walk into a home littered with celebrity gossip magazines and other disposable rubbish and you can instantly ascertain the vapid neurological structures of those obsessed with such dregs. Conversely, stroll into an estate housing a vast collection of treatises on philosophy and ethics and you'll know you're in interesting company.

Literature is immortal telepathy. It provides a method by which ideas live on after the spirit producing them passes.

It offers a platform through which ideas can promulgate themselves throughout the depths of time.

So rather than watching television and before surfing the interwebs, curl up with a favorite book.

Open that conduit through space and time and let your mind interface with another.

Or better yet--sit down at a computer and write your own.

Then tell me about it. I'll give it a look.

After all, nothing is more interesting than obtaining singular vantage into a mind--

Unless, of course, that mind happens be filled with nothing but information on the Kardashians.




posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 09:15 PM
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a reply to: Trachel

Digging the thought process. SnF



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 09:18 PM
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Hi.
You're right in a way, literature is some sort of canned telepathy, as is this exchange of thoughts on an online forum; i feel fine online, reading you're thoughts.
Music can transport most complex thoughts and feelings without saying a word. Sometimes it inspires people to write a book.

To me, the division you make is unnecessary: a read book will be a read book to any kind of person with any kind of life style.

Thank you for that other thread! Might change my life.



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 09:21 PM
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Great write up. This is a thought that's been running through my head on and off for some time now, though I never could put it as eloquently as you have here.

We're all mind readers here, performing telepathy by the process of conveying our thoughts in a non-verbal way in the form of posts on this forum.

It's non-conventional but true nonetheless.

S&F



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 09:50 PM
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a reply to: Trachel

Thank you. I am a writer and this is, ultimately, why most of us write -- to share our thoughts and feelings with others. 'Literary technique' is what we call the set of methods and tricks we use to do this as accurately as we can, because it's only telepathy if the right thoughts get through.

Amateurs sharing their thoughts on the internet aren't usually capable of that, which is why Internet debates and conversations never really achieve anything. It's also why anyone who can write persuasively risks being labelled a disinformationist.

For the paranoid, literary technique is mind manipulation. They're right in a way, but then, so is ordinary speech; as experts in the field observe, all communications are for the benefit of the sender.


edit on 12/8/15 by Astyanax because: of more to communicate.



posted on Aug, 13 2015 @ 01:55 AM
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I wouldn't call it telepathy because telepathy means more of a direct mind-to-mind contact.

It's not only literature that gives us a glimpse into the minds of people who lived a very long time ago. Art and especially architecture, are also great indicators of what the people who created them were like. So is film, come to think of it.

There's also the matter of interpretation. For example, lots of people wrongly interpret Romeo and Juliet to be a story that glorifies love, when it's actually more of a scathing criticism of young wanton love. Your interpretation, even your appreciation, of a particular story will be influenced by your personality and your culture.

Some people say language is what sets us apart from animals, but animals have their languages of sorts. I think it's our propensity for stories which sets us apart; people will always love stories, be it in a film or a book or a simple anecdote.



posted on Aug, 13 2015 @ 02:17 AM
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a reply to: Trachel

Excellent work, I share your enthusiasm; thanks for a nice read.




edit on 13-8-2015 by Bybyots because: . : .



posted on Aug, 13 2015 @ 03:35 AM
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a reply to: DeepThoughtCriminal


I wouldn't call it telepathy because telepathy means more of a direct mind-to-mind contact.

I think most of us understand that the OP's use of the word is metaphorical.


It's not only literature that gives us a glimpse into the minds of people who lived a very long time ago. Art and especially architecture, are also great indicators of what the people who created them were like. So is film, come to think of it.

Surely there is a huge difference between what can be inferred from a work of art or architecture and the direct sharing of an articulated thought that is possible through written communication. If that weren't so, we would be drawing rather than writing notes to each other, and having conversations with one another by pointing at buildings.

I must say I feel rather sorry for you. One of literacy's greatest joys is the ability to reach into other minds across the gulfs of leagues and centuries. If you cannot understand or experience this, you may not be a fully-functioning product of civilization.

Although I suspect your opinion of civilization is as low as that of literature.



posted on Aug, 13 2015 @ 08:15 AM
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originally posted by: DeepThoughtCriminal
I wouldn't call it telepathy because telepathy means more of a direct mind-to-mind contact.


I think it is direct mind-to-mind contact, albeit in delayed form.

So I guess you could really call it "time-capsule telepathy," which also has a nice ring to it.




posted on Aug, 13 2015 @ 08:19 AM
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originally posted by: Astyanax
a reply to: Trachel

Thank you. I am a writer and this is, ultimately, why most of us write -- to share our thoughts and feelings with others. 'Literary technique' is what we call the set of methods and tricks we use to do this as accurately as we can, because it's only telepathy if the right thoughts get through.



Well said.

I'm also a writer, and that's essentially what I believe. Through narrative I can inject thoughtstreams into the heads of my readers, creating new neurological pathways that linger long after the last word's been read.

Quite literally I'm building a kingdom of imagination within their minds.

So that's a responsibility I take seriously--and I try only inserting the best/most benevolent ideas into their heads.

Cheers!



posted on Aug, 13 2015 @ 08:21 AM
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originally posted by: 3NL1GHT3N3D1
Great write up. This is a thought that's been running through my head on and off for some time now, though I never could put it as eloquently as you have here.


Thanks! But don't sell yourself short.

I believe you (a lot of you!) could've written it even better.

There's tons of literary/narrative talent on this board. It's inspiring.



posted on Aug, 13 2015 @ 08:21 AM
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originally posted by: NearLifeExperience
Thank you for that other thread! Might change my life.


Which other thread?

If I'm changing lives here, I wanna know about it!



posted on Aug, 13 2015 @ 09:03 AM
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a reply to: Trachel

Probably the closest way to a Vulcan mind meld that a person can get, so in a way it kind of is.

I read a few passages from the Bible and the summary of Book of Job yesterday...Now I have the sudden urge to send anyone who use or defies my ever loving God, to Oblivion. I think the spirit of Satan took over.

And I'll be forgiven for it every time they meet their maker for judgement, showing them the light and get a little commission...yea, sorry, not in the happiest of moods. Good thread tho.
edit on 13-8-2015 by Specimen because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 13 2015 @ 12:46 PM
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I've got one word that proves this wrong...

Bible

The hell of misinterpreted literature has befell mankind just as often as any accurate interpretations have inspired.



posted on Aug, 13 2015 @ 08:35 PM
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A very interesting perspective on books and the power of words as they echo throughout the ages.

With modern advancements in technology, it appears as if physical books have become less appealing; why carry around a thick novel or textbook when you can just use a tablet or notebook to store hundreds at once? Still, temporarily removing yourself from the excesses of technology and reading a physical book remains rewarding.



posted on Aug, 13 2015 @ 08:47 PM
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originally posted by: Dark Ghost
A very interesting perspective on books and the power of words as they echo throughout the ages.

With modern advancements in technology, it appears as if physical books have become less appealing; why carry around a thick novel or textbook when you can just use a tablet or notebook to store hundreds at once? Still, temporarily removing yourself from the excesses of technology and reading a physical book remains rewarding.


I personally only read physical books. I hate reading on a laptop or tablet screen, and there's just something enjoyable about flipping through those ink-scrawled pages and bookmarking your place in that volume.

Every home should have a reading room--not only does it look great but it's an instant conversation starter--and it's super disappointing that in the future most will probably have nothing more than a computer with folders of files instead of a chamber containing endless assortments of book-filled shelves.



posted on Aug, 24 2015 @ 12:21 AM
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a reply to: Trachel

In this age, information is shared through the internet. Everyone gets to have information. You say you don't like reading on a laptop or tablet, but for some people, that is the only to get certain information.

The internet is helping people to spread ideas.



posted on Aug, 30 2015 @ 03:46 AM
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a reply to: Trachel

S&F, but i'd say it goes for all artforms, not just writing.
It is what i call the pool of thoughtsmash, because in a way every new story or new picture, or song, or statue is refining what inspired the person doing it, till at some point one will write the ultimate scifi novel... Building (metaphorical) pyramids, like in science, which is also kind of an artform, maths and physics, IT, etc. is what we do. Getting better wth each step, then stuff crumbles, like in tv entertainment, but eventually it will get build up bigger and better after the clean up.
I ramble, sorry, very inspiring.

writing on an internet forum is not exatly art, it needs a lot less thought, structure and effort.



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