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"Why 96 million 'shadeballs' were just released into the LA Reservoir"

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posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 02:09 PM
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"Why 96 million 'shadeballs' were just released into the LA Reservoir"


"The shadeball mania started in 2008 after Los Angeles realized that two of its reservoirs had unusually high levels of bromate, a suspect cancer-causing agent. Since bromate is formed when sunlight reacts with bromide (a chemical found in water) and ozone or chlorine (both of which are used to disinfect water) the city decided to shield the water from sunlight."

According to Bloomberg, the four-inch-wide shadeballs are coated with a UV-light blocking chemical. They're hollow and filled with water to keep them from flying away. Each one costs around 36¢ to make. "


Just a quick edit but Bromate is used in farming in California despite being a known carcinogen.

This entire project sounds ridiculous and kind of sinister.

40,000,000 was spent to cover a water reservoir in black plastic balls - why not white plastic balls that would cool the water no one knows.

What is known is that it's supposedly to fight algae and carcinogens that are formed when chemicals "added" to the water supply are exposed to sunlight.

What happens when super heated black plastic sits in water - probably more carcinogens I'd imagine - but whats even worse is the plastic balls are themselves coated in UV blocking chemicals that are also likely carcinogenic.

With this and the massive reduction of roadways I think this is the stage for massive reductions in population or crippling movement for control and taxation - either that or these people are ridiculously stupid....which I don't buy.

finance.yahoo.com... 4.html
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posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 02:17 PM
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I sincerely have no idea what consequences this will bring to the water.... but since we are talking about the one thing we should't mess up, i hope they did intensive studies on the subject, right? wishful thinking?



Video:


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posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 02:21 PM
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a reply to: circuitsports

If the plastic they use is "BPA free" then the plastic might not be leeching deadly toxins into the water, but as you stated, the UV-blocking chemicals will also likely seep into the waterways. It does not sound like a very well thought out project.

I think that the reason the plastic balls are black is because the black color allows the balls to absorb the sunlight better, thus preventing it from reaching the water where the bromide sits.



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 02:39 PM
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Does anyone have a list of chemicals they are using in the plastic or the coating?

This is really strange. It must be experimental, this is the only place its being tried?

I can't wait to hear Boron is one, that absorbs Neutrinos from Radioactivity.

ETA: oaky, they're made of Polyethylene, have water in them for ballast and…


They’re also seeing use on the tailing ponds where miners store contaminated water, to keep birds away from toxic agents, and in wastewater treatment facilities, to keep odors at bay.

Still like to know what the chemical coating is.
edit on 12-8-2015 by intrptr because: ETA:



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 02:46 PM
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Back in 2008, soon after high levels of bromate were detected in the city's Silver Lake and Ivanhoe reservoirs, the utility dropped its first batch of shade balls into the water as a low-cost, maintenance-free solution to the chemical reaction.

So lets hope research from 2008 has shown that its safe

www.plasticsnews.com...

www.care2.com...



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 02:54 PM
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a reply to: astra001uk

abcnews.go.com...

I was wondering if it was safe, would the balls leach any chemicals in the water...I read that the balls would prevent evaporation and save millions of gallons of water

balls will save 300 million gallons of water a year
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edit on 12-8-2015 by research100 because: dang spellings



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 03:06 PM
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a reply to: research100

so since these balls will keep 300 millions gallons from evaporating,will this have any effect on the weather? the balls are supposed to last 10 years, by the way



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 03:22 PM
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a reply to: research100

Since the balls are all dark, i suspect it will be part of heating the water.

Seems to be a radical "solution", to a much bigger problem.



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 03:24 PM
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This sounds like some convoluted super villain plot.

"If you don't give me what I want Bat Person, I will dump 96 million shadeballs into the reservoir, MUHAHAHA MUHAHAHA MUHAHAHAHA," cackles Jokester.


edit on 12-8-2015 by karmicecstasy because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 03:27 PM
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Here is another helpful link...

keith650.wix.com...



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 03:31 PM
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a reply to: research100

sadly i have read that carbon black is the covering on the shade balls to stop the uv from breaking down the plastic in the balls

Carbon black (subtypes are acetylene black, channel black, furnace black, lamp black and thermal black) is a material produced by the incomplete combustion of heavy petroleum products such as FCC tar, coal tar, ethylene cracking tar, and a small amount from vegetable oil. Carbon black is a form of paracrystalline carbon that has a high surface-area-to-volume ratio, albeit lower than that of activated carbon
The current International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) evaluation is that, "Carbon black is possibly carcinogenic to humans



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 04:19 PM
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They should read Viktor Schauberger instead of plastic balls.



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 04:25 PM
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originally posted by: astra001uk
a reply to: research100
The current International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) evaluation is that, "Carbon black is possibly carcinogenic to humans

Swell.







posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 05:53 PM
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a reply to: circuitsports

You know what the saying "blackballed" means?

This is striking me like an omen right now.

No nice nature reserve lake here, just an industrial dreary black swirling mass. Sure ain't pretty, though it must be necessary.

It makes me think thoughts like this,

"What have they done to the earth?
What have they done to our fair sister?
Ravaged and plundered and ripped her and bit her
Stuck her with knives in the side of the dawn
And tied her with fences and dragged her down" - Jim Morrison (L.A Poet)

and this,



Something tells me guys like this don't say words like that for nothing.



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 07:01 PM
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I saw this earlier and while it may prevent algae, and some UV related reactions, it will not reduce evaporation IME.

Unless there is literally no wind or water movement, rolling balls will result in faster evaporation as the surface area is exponentially increased. Since I watched the balls rolling and shifting in the water in one video, I know that this is not the case.

Secondly, the black balls will absorb a lot more heat than would have been reflected by the water. It will transfer to the reservoir and heat it more quickly. This is just an expensive boondoggle waiting to complete its journey with unknown secondary consequences.



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 07:04 PM
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Isn't this kind of like chemtrails for water, same principle right? Reflect sunlight?

They're chemtrailing the water!



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 08:28 PM
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Seems more like "rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic" with a topping of "unfortunate and unforeseen consequences" than it does anything else.



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 08:45 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

There's nothing experimental with uv resistant plastic that's safe for drinking water, virtually every home in Australia uses it from the mains to the house.



posted on Aug, 13 2015 @ 01:43 AM
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Duh why don't they cover the reseviour with solar panels to create shade and make electricity at the same time.....
I didn't mean to say duh to you guys I meant the plastic ball guys.



posted on Aug, 13 2015 @ 01:54 AM
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Would n`t the money spent have been more effective building more water impoundment?




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