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Astronaut Scott Kelly captures sunrise over western US.. And stars are showing behind sun

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posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 10:38 AM
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Astronaut Scott Kelly captures sunrise over western US.. And stars are showing behind sun

I guess there are stars in space after all... and some kind of golden showers top right ?



photograph of a sunrise and posted it to social media on Aug. 10, 2015. Kelly wrote, "#GoodMorning to those in the western #USA. Looks like there's a lot going on down there. #YearInSpace"

The space station and its crew orbit Earth from an altitude of 220 miles, traveling at a speed of approximately 17,500 miles per hour. Because the station completes each trip around the globe in about 92 minutes, the crew experiences 16 sunrises and sunsets each day.


How is this picture even possible ? Picture taken directly at the sun and still showing stars in the background, even with long exposure mode, the sun would have whited the whole picture, and everything would be blurred out due to movement. Try looking into a strong flashlight and see if you can see anything behind it, nope.. Edited in star background ?

Org:


Enhanced:


www.nasa.gov...


edit on 12-8-2015 by Spacespider because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 10:44 AM
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I thought that the top objects were parts of the ISS. I suppose they could belong to the perseids, but you would have thought he would have mentioned them...nice picture BTW

edit on 12-8-2015 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 10:44 AM
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a reply to: Spacespider

Wow those pictures are truly amazing! Thanks for sharing!



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 11:00 AM
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a reply to: Spacespider

Nice pic.




and some kind of golden showers top right ?

The picture is probably taken from here, and the "golden shower" is reflections in the glass in the cupola.


edit on 12-8-2015 by Mianeye because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 11:02 AM
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Amazing and inspiring!

Our little blue bubble...our small star...



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 11:06 AM
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Looks like a hole in our space time allowing in light/energy.

What's through that looking glass?!?



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 11:24 AM
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Absolutely stunning. Thank you



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 11:29 AM
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My God, its full of stars…

star field



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 11:32 AM
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originally posted by: Mianeye
the "golden shower" is reflections in the glass in the cupola.
I would have guessed they are the solar panels for the ISS, outside, not reflections, but I'm not sure. They look like solar panels to me.


+1 more 
posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 11:34 AM
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I still wonder why the stars weren't visible from the photos taken from the moon.

Beautiful pics.....!
edit on 12-8-2015 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 11:36 AM
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Awesome photo, thanks for sharing!


I like how the atmosphere seems so thin and sensitive to the hostility of space... Maybe because it is, please keep strong!



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 11:37 AM
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originally posted by: olaru12
I still wonder why the stars weren't visible from the photos taken from the moon.


Yes me to.. perhaps if this picture was long exposure.. but if that was the case, picture would just be white by the sun light and everything would be blurred due to movement.

So I would think either the moon footage is fake or the sky have been edited out.



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 11:39 AM
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Beautiful pictures. Thank you for sharing


Call me old school, but I think the amount of light visible on Earth is a little depressing... but to each their own.



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 11:58 AM
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a reply to: Spacespider

Maybe the sunlight gets scattered by the atmosphere at ground level more and produces the glare effect common in photos taken on earth? In a near vacuum would the effect be reduced?



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 12:03 PM
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originally posted by: Urantia1111
a reply to: Spacespider

Maybe the sunlight gets scattered by the atmosphere at ground level more and produces the glare effect common in photos taken on earth? In a near vacuum would the effect be reduced?



Could be, but that makes me wonder why we dont see stars from the moon missions.

Because this explanation from Nasa dont quite hold up "When a camera is adjusted to take pictures of the bright Earth and Moon, the much dimmer stars don’t show up in the photo."

How the hell can a direct picture of the sun not out glare the faith stars if the earth can from the moon



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 12:28 PM
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a reply to: Spacespider

It's because of the sunlight reflected by the moon's surface. Looking at the sky from the dark side of the moon this wouldn't be a problem and because there's no atmosphere (technically, it has one but it's about a billionth of the density of the Earth's) one would see far more stars than from Earth.

Also, keep in mind that the windows in the ISS have a coating that blocks UV. From NASA website:


The reflective coating on the window absorbs UV radiation, but transmittance rises rapidly after 304 nm to > 90 percent in the visible and into the near infrared. Transmittance begins to tail off after 800 nm, but is nearly 50 percent to 1,500 nm. It is effectively zero at approximately 2,600 nm


edit on 2015-8-12 by theantediluvian because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 12:29 PM
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a reply to: Spacespider

IF those "moon photos" are even real, the bright white surface reflects so much light that the brightness of the camera has to be turned down so far that the stars might not show up. My cell camera does a similar thing. If i include too much bright sky, i lose a lot of darker foreground in my shot. Its some kind of auto brightness correct on the cell.



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 12:30 PM
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originally posted by: theantediluvian
a reply to: Spacespider

It's because of the sunlight reflected by the moon's surface. Looking at the sky from the dark side of the moon this wouldn't be a problem and because there's no atmosphere (technically, it has one but it's about a billionth of the density of the Earth's) one would see far more stars than from Earth.

Also, keep in mind that the windows in the ISS have a coating that blocks UV. From NASA website:


The reflective coating on the window absorbs UV radiation, but transmittance rises rapidly after 304 nm to > 90 percent in the visible and into the near infrared. Transmittance begins to tail off after 800 nm, but is nearly 50 percent to 1,500 nm. It is effectively zero at approximately 2,600 nm


Would the coating not block out the other stars to not only our own ?



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 12:30 PM
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I'm sure there's going to be a 'logical' explanation when NASA realizes this.



posted on Aug, 12 2015 @ 12:38 PM
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Lovely.



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