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Astronomers discover humongous structure one-ninth the size of the observable universe

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posted on Aug, 9 2015 @ 11:16 AM
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IaRite ! Still think they're stargates emitting the maximum power output that the dhd device can handle...maybe if they're all dialling at the same time, it's the replicators tring to invade all the universe at once..them pesky bugs.




posted on Aug, 9 2015 @ 04:50 PM
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originally posted by: ChaoticOrder
I don't really see how this object could possibly be 1/9th the size of the observable universe if we cannot even see it in the sky. So it's 9 galaxies clustered together... each galaxy would then be 1/9/9th the size of the observable universe? Doesn't seem right to me... but in any case a cluster of 9 galaxies would still appear to go against the standard model of inflation. Just another reason in the long line of reasons why the singularity-inflation model is wrong.


Sounds more like someone is looking at one galaxy being magnified by "gravitational lensing". Now they see nine large galaxies, each giving off gamma ray bursts at the same time... And strangely enough all nine galaxies are rotating at the same time...



posted on Aug, 9 2015 @ 05:01 PM
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originally posted by: stormcell

originally posted by: ChaoticOrder
I don't really see how this object could possibly be 1/9th the size of the observable universe if we cannot even see it in the sky. So it's 9 galaxies clustered together... each galaxy would then be 1/9/9th the size of the observable universe? Doesn't seem right to me... but in any case a cluster of 9 galaxies would still appear to go against the standard model of inflation. Just another reason in the long line of reasons why the singularity-inflation model is wrong.


Sounds more like someone is looking at one galaxy being magnified by "gravitational lensing". Now they see nine large galaxies, each giving off gamma ray bursts at the same time... And strangely enough all nine galaxies are rotating at the same time...





There is no object or cluster of galaxies.
Have you looked at the picture in this article?
They are just connecting a bunch of dots literally.
www.ras.org.uk...

They say:
If the ring represents a real spatial structure, then it has to be seen nearly face-on because of the small variations of GRB distances around the object's centre. The ring could though instead be a projection of a sphere, where the GRBs all occurred within a 250 million year period, a short timescale compared with the age of the universe.”
A spheroidal ring projection would mirror the strings of clusters of galaxies seen to surround voids in the universe; voids and string-like formations are seen and predicted by many models of the cosmos. The newly discovered ring is however at least ten times larger than known voids.


So they're using dots to make a circle which might indicate the presence of a massive void...now how is it a void if it's full of galaxies ? Cause a region that large has billions of galaxies.
edit on 9-8-2015 by Choice777 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 10 2015 @ 12:25 PM
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This apparent ring, (or what looks a bit like a spiral to me) of galaxies is 5 billion light years across and 7 billion light years distant. It spans about 36 degrees in the sky, better than 70 times the width of the full Moon.
We've only missed it until now because of the extreme dimness of the galaxies involved.
Gravitational lensing doesn't fit for such a wide spacing of objects. Besides that, the shape distortion of objects in gravitational lensing wasn't reported in this case.
This very probably isn't a case of simply joining up random galaxies. A statistical case was made that their only one chance in 20,000 that these nine galaxies would have no relation to one another, yet be arranged in this manner.

If, as it's said, such a arrangement of galaxies is impossible, according to our current understanding of the evolution and structure of the universe, so be it. This discovery will be checked and rechecked to a fare-thee-well. It it proves to be true and sound, we will simply have to update our understanding of the universe.
edit on 10-8-2015 by Ross 54 because: corrected information

edit on 10-8-2015 by Ross 54 because: improved paragraph structure.

edit on 10-8-2015 by Ross 54 because: corrected information



posted on Aug, 10 2015 @ 12:25 PM
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Don't know if anyone saw this, but there is another structure they just released info on that defies the cosmological constant as well.

Article dated August 7th, 2015

Ring of Galaxies Should Not Exist
edit on 10-8-2015 by Everlastingknowitall because: broken link



posted on Aug, 10 2015 @ 12:28 PM
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a reply to: Everlastingknowitall

This may actually be the same superstructure, documented in two different articles as they learn more about it. I am not certain.



posted on Aug, 10 2015 @ 03:31 PM
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I wish they did not call it superstructures. Every celestial body has gravity pull (well) to affect all other celestial bodies. Be it a planet, star, galaxy, galaxy cluster and what not.
IMO, of course.
Question is if they are moving apart or closing together?

I think they are in position to attract, closing together.

cheers)) board

D0.
edit on 10-8-2015 by darkorange because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 10 2015 @ 04:34 PM
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a reply to: Ross 54

So what's the actual pixel resolution these astronomers get so see the galaxies in ? Cause i imagine they compare the predicted shapes or expected shapes to the actual shape distortion and then they see these galaxies match, as in have the same defects. So they couldn't just compare actual 2d/3d shapes with radio observatories, no ? They must use proper cmos sensors, so what the resolution? In the hundreds of megapixels ? or just 50-100 mp ?
I can almost bet you're an actual paid professional astronomer cause nobody would really bother to complete the edit reason box like that

I have an idea...what if it's dark matter thats causing the lensing. A big huge mass of dark matter, or maybe even more exotic: another universe intersecting our universe at some random angle ?



posted on Aug, 10 2015 @ 06:08 PM
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As it turns out, the detections were solely of Gamma Ray Bursts. The structures of the galaxies that host these events apparently could not be meaningfully detected; they are presumably simply too far away.

It was not reported that the point-like sources of Gamma rays were distorted into very small loops or close-set groups of points. There is apparently no basis to suspect that they are gravitationally lensed. Dark matter is believed to be thinly dispersed in space. This would not allow it to act as a gravitational lens.

It may be that the gravitational constant is more powerful at a point in space, 7 billion light years distant. This could allow the galaxies to pull together into the arrangement seen. It may also be that gravity was stronger, seven billion years ago.
edit on 10-8-2015 by Ross 54 because: (no reason given)

edit on 10-8-2015 by Ross 54 because: improved paragraph structure. Added explanatory word, corrected spelling



posted on Aug, 13 2015 @ 06:01 PM
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a reply to: Ross 54

Interesting you bring up the varying strength of gravity.
I believe when this big bang occured, time went by very quickly until particles started to interact by the force of gravity.
This area where the cluster of galaxies is was the first to cool down and develop into their shape, attracting as much matter from the rest of the universe before it too cooled down enough to form its own structures.

I'm not versed in scientific language but I'll try my best,
I believe gravity is the key to what we perceive as time. The farther you go from the source of gravity, the quicker time will escape you. The sun is a weak gravity source compared to a blackhole so I'm talking beyond galaxy far to notice the effect.

This 9 galaxy cluster was created inevitably by the force of gravity(or the simple interactions of particles as they cooled) this cluster was the first to begin it's journey into nothingness(blackhole), in doing so, it created the largest superstructure seen thus far.
Why should the universe be homogenous? The entire existence of everything has so far been survival of the fittest, whether it's a larger galaxy swallowing a smaller or a corrupt bussinessman spending vacations instead of giving some of his fortune to the poor.

The universe, in my opinion, is far different than any physics has explained to date. Yeah we got the basics with Einstein, but now comes the really weird stuff.

Just my unscientific mouth blabbering..



posted on Sep, 7 2015 @ 08:19 PM
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originally posted by: Timely
Could it be as; an atom seeing a sinew/tendon for the first time ?

As above - down below, fractals and possibly fibonacci ...


Wow! I honestly thought of our galaxy as just a blood vessel or a cell in a much larger system... And that collection of galaxies that look like veins are just that and this may be us seeing an organ. I always think of us as so tiny.



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