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Bounty hunters mistakenly raid home of Phoenix police chief

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posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 11:19 PM
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Lol. A tip on facebook lead bounty hunters to raid the wrong house. It was the Pheonix chief of police..

The owners of the bond companies were immediately arrested.. Somebody set this bondsman up bigtime. Just too funny


lose to a dozen bounty hunters raided a Phoenix home Tuesday night, looking for a suspected fugitive.

But they made a big mistake, thanks to a bad Facebook tip.

The home they raided belongs to the Phoenix Chief of Police.

It happened at around 10 p.m.


www.kpho.com...




posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 11:25 PM
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a reply to: alienjuggalo

Why would you use facebook as your sole source of basically breaking and entering?

They are bounty hunters, not police officers, they cannot break the law to obtain their target.

That is amazing, I understand social media is a good source of information, but it's also where people post cat pics and opinions and here they are treating it like it was house.gov.



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 11:33 PM
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I'm willing to bet that the guy that was on the run was the one who sent in the false tip. Either that or he had one of his buddies do it. Although this is rather humorous, this is some serious business. I bet those bounty hunters are feeling pretty stupid right about now. lol
edit on 8/5/2015 by Slash because: (no reason given)


+7 more 
posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 11:49 PM
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The whole thing reads just like what the cops do to civilians.
Only difference is, the raiders are arrested cause it was a cops house.

Sounds like a case of "But it's ok when we do it but not when you do..."



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 11:58 PM
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a reply to: Tranceopticalinclined

Depends on what state the bounty hunters are operating in or licensed for. They can enter a home without a warrant and they can force entry if it is believed to contain the fugitive they are looking for. In some states bounty hunters have more power than police but better be prepared to back everything up with lots of documentation and homework as far as evidence, I don't believe a Facebook post would suffice and in this case these guys are in loads of trouble and not just because its the PC's house.



posted on Aug, 6 2015 @ 01:24 AM
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a reply to: alienjuggalo

Lol. Sounds like someone got swatted.



posted on Aug, 6 2015 @ 02:36 AM
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a reply to: Tranceopticalinclined

It probably happens all the time. In many other areas of society we don't really adhere to a true standard of proof either, we simply act first and then look for evidence to support those actions. I imagine that's what happened here.



posted on Aug, 6 2015 @ 02:39 AM
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originally posted by: rockintitz
a reply to: alienjuggalo

Lol. Sounds like someone got swatted.


You have to admit, swatting a cop has a certain tasty irony to it.



posted on Aug, 6 2015 @ 03:04 AM
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These idiots are VERY lucky they got the wrong, wrong, house. There are quite a few people that wouldn't take too kindly to being awoken like that, and would be taking a very different route if they saw someone screaming at them on the porch holding a gun.



posted on Aug, 6 2015 @ 03:09 AM
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Maybe the tip was good just the specifics less than forthcoming. A dozen bounty hunters and none thought to "investigate" the tip? I can see Dog yelling at his TV....than bows his head in prayer.

Why not just offer to buy the man a security system? He obviously needs it.



posted on Aug, 6 2015 @ 03:17 AM
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This is BRILLIANT! You get two different sets of fascists to arrest each other, and in so doing make them decry their own tactics and standards of evidence!
I wonder what the parameters for doing this in a legally protected watchdog manner would be. I assume you couldn't flat out lie to the police... But giving vague or cherry picked information to a quasi-deputized loan-shark?



posted on Aug, 6 2015 @ 06:19 AM
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originally posted by: DJMSN
a reply to: Tranceopticalinclined

Depends on what state the bounty hunters are operating in or licensed for. They can enter a home without a warrant and they can force entry if it is believed to contain the fugitive they are looking for. In some states bounty hunters have more power than police but better be prepared to back everything up with lots of documentation and homework as far as evidence, I don't believe a Facebook post would suffice and in this case these guys are in loads of trouble and not just because its the PC's house.

This is why bounty hunting is just about banned in calif.

Bounty hunters in calif may look around for the fugitive till they see him then they have to call the cops to pick him up.



posted on Aug, 6 2015 @ 06:39 AM
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originally posted by: alienjuggalo
Lol. A tip on facebook lead bounty hunters to raid the wrong house. It was the Pheonix chief of police..

The owners of the bond companies were immediately arrested.. Somebody set this bondsman up bigtime. Just too funny


lose to a dozen bounty hunters raided a Phoenix home Tuesday night, looking for a suspected fugitive.

But they made a big mistake, thanks to a bad Facebook tip.

The home they raided belongs to the Phoenix Chief of Police.

It happened at around 10 p.m.


www.kpho.com...


It is a shame it wasn't SWAT doing the raiding !



posted on Aug, 6 2015 @ 12:50 PM
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a reply to: ShadowLink

Exactly...not much more to add to this other than shouldn't this set a precedent for officers acting negligently in collecting evidence of suspect whereabouts or surveillance/investigations to be arrested on the same type of charges?



posted on Aug, 6 2015 @ 02:18 PM
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Yeah, that was interesting, educational, and humorous read. I just discovered that bounty hunters (bail bondsmen) still exist in a first world nation such as the States. I just had a moment of reflection...


Bail bond agents are almost exclusively found in the United States and its former commonwealth, the Philippines. In most other countries bail is usually much less and the practice of bounty hunting is illegal. The industry is represented by various trade associations, with the American Bail Coalition forming an umbrella group in the United States.


I have to ask: Does anyone else find that this practice still exist as a business in a first world nation with law enforcement and judicial infrastructure F'd up? The fact that the practice is illegal in other nations and yet remains legal and condoned by the system in the U.S is mind-blowing, to say the least. Still funny string of events to read and digest tho. Thank you for sharing.

en.wikipedia.org...


edit on 6-8-2015 by Involutionist because: grammar and punctuation SUCKS!



posted on Aug, 9 2015 @ 01:36 PM
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a reply to: Involutionist

What one must remember is that from day 1 American freedom has been made by rich merchants for rich merchants. They didn't WANT to dissolve the state's power to protect their property and their position, they wanted to usurp it. So they raised the flag of the British East India Company and built a toothless government that actively guaranteed little other than the right of the rich and well connected to be their own enforcers.

The constitution says you have a right to speak but it doesn't actually say what you can do if somebody stops you. It does however explicitly spell out how any property owner can go to war against anyone anywhere in the world on his own and in the event that they lose, blame the United States in order to avoid hanging for piracy (letters of reprisal, which are still in there).

A government has gradually been rebuilt by those people in palatable increments of hypocrisy (starting with George Washington leading troops against tax protests) but the owners and operators of that government have kept themselves integral in an off the books way by delegating government power to private entities which they own.

It's not an anachronism or an oversight. It is a second set of reigns over legal process that legally introduces profit motive into decisions on which criminals are brought to justice, and which ones are merely required to take out a loan to continue operating, making the criminal justice system itself an organizing influence in crime very much like a mafia.



posted on Aug, 10 2015 @ 12:16 AM
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a reply to: The Vagabond

Thanks for taking the time to comment with much insight. Starred that one.



It is a second set of reigns over legal process that legally introduces profit motive into decisions on which criminals are brought to justice, and which ones are merely required to take out a loan to continue operating, making the criminal justice system itself an organizing influence in crime very much like a mafia.


Yeah, I was already aware of all that. I was just asking if anybody actually paused for a moment to question the absurdity of bounty hunters being a legal business that seems to be condoned in America by the system AND society. Due to gauging the flow of the conversation as I read through the thread; I had to ask despite the fact it was rhetorical question.

It all comes down to $$$.




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