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Cern released statement they are creating a superconducting shield for astronauts.

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posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 04:24 PM
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The team at Cern are working on a a superconducting magnet to protect against radiation in deep space exploration. 'Tis a bit cool I think.

Now we just need inertial dampeners and a warp drive




The superconductor coils for the prototype magnet will be made of magnesium diboride (MgB2), the same type of conductor that was developed in the form of wire for the High Luminosity Cold Powering project at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.
“In the framework of the project, we will test, in the coming months, a racetrack coil wound with an MgB2 superconducting tape,” says Bernardo Bordini, coordinator of CERN activity in the framework of the SR2S project. “The prototype coil is designed to quantify the effectiveness of the superconducting magnetic shielding technology.”

Back in April 2014, the CERN Superconductors team announced a world-record current in an electrical transmission line using cables made of the MgB2 superconductor. This result proved that the technology could be used in the form of wire and could be a viable solution for both electrical transmission for accelerator technology and long-distance power transportation. Now, the MgB2 superconductor has found another application: it will soon be tested in a prototype coil that could provide the solution to ensure safe trips for astronauts during deep-space missions. The idea is to create an active magnetic field to shield the spacecraft from high-energy cosmic particles. “In the framework of this project, CERN is testing MgB2 tape in a configuration that has specifically been developed for the SR2S project by Columbus Superconductors,” explains Amalia Ballarino, Superconductors and Superconducting Devices section leader.



cds.cern.ch...




posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 04:30 PM
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originally posted by: zazzafrazz
The team at Cern are working on a a superconducting magnet to protect against radiation in deep space exploration. 'Tis a bit cool I think.

Now we just need inertial dampeners and a warp drive




The superconductor coils for the prototype magnet will be made of magnesium diboride (MgB2), the same type of conductor that was developed in the form of wire for the High Luminosity Cold Powering project at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.
“In the framework of the project, we will test, in the coming months, a racetrack coil wound with an MgB2 superconducting tape,” says Bernardo Bordini, coordinator of CERN activity in the framework of the SR2S project. “The prototype coil is designed to quantify the effectiveness of the superconducting magnetic shielding technology.”

Back in April 2014, the CERN Superconductors team announced a world-record current in an electrical transmission line using cables made of the MgB2 superconductor. This result proved that the technology could be used in the form of wire and could be a viable solution for both electrical transmission for accelerator technology and long-distance power transportation. Now, the MgB2 superconductor has found another application: it will soon be tested in a prototype coil that could provide the solution to ensure safe trips for astronauts during deep-space missions. The idea is to create an active magnetic field to shield the spacecraft from high-energy cosmic particles. “In the framework of this project, CERN is testing MgB2 tape in a configuration that has specifically been developed for the SR2S project by Columbus Superconductors,” explains Amalia Ballarino, Superconductors and Superconducting Devices section leader.



cds.cern.ch...


This has other implications, too.

Superinductors anyone?



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 04:49 PM
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a reply to: zazzafrazz

It would much simpler, and fail safe, to just surround the astronaut quarters with water.

No/minimal need for power (to keep water liquid)

Yes, there is a weight issue,but it would be far worse with a complex electromagnet system and the required power source.



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 04:51 PM
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a reply to: M5xaz

And how much will that weigh?



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 04:59 PM
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a reply to: zazzafrazz

Don't forget to dis-engage those inertial dampeners...



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 05:00 PM
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The team at Cern are working on a a superconducting magnet to protect against radiation in deep space exploration.
cds.cern.ch...


I thought we developed protection years ago. we went to the moon several times with absolutely no issue and total disregard for radiation, and there appears to be absolutely no adverse effect on any of the astronauts, most outlive people never exposed to radiation.

CERN should work with NASA and find out how they successfully sent astronauts and sensitive equipment to space seemingly flawlessly (6 times manned, and countless unmanned) back in the 60's to early 70's.

I can control my car with my phone now, and the cell phone hasn't been around that long, yet somehow space exploration still progresses at this rate.
if it was that easy in the 60's and 70's , we shouldn't be researching radiation protection at this point in time.

in terms of long range, just piggy back on NASA's tech and improve it, since they were so successful each time



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 05:06 PM
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a reply to: odzeandennz

So, that's not true. We used a lot of gold to help insulate the astronauts, and still it's estimated the radiation dose for the moon trip was about a decade's worth as being on Earth, if I'm recalling correctly.



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 05:10 PM
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a reply to: Orwells Ghost

I would bet it would weigh less than this electromagnet system and the (likely) nuclear reactor required to power it



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 05:10 PM
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a reply to: odzeandennz

Reading the article helps.


During long-duration trips in space and in the absence of the magnetosphere that protects people living on Earth, astronauts are bombarded with high-energy cosmic rays that might cause a significant increase in the probability of various types of cancers. Because of this, exploration missions to Mars or other distant destinations will only become realistically possible if an effective solution for adequately shielding astronauts is found. “If the prototype coil we will be testing produces successful results, we will have contributed important information to the feasibility of the superconducting magnetic shield,” says Ballarino.



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 05:16 PM
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originally posted by: odzeandennz


The team at Cern are working on a a superconducting magnet to protect against radiation in deep space exploration.
cds.cern.ch...


I thought we developed protection years ago. we went to the moon several times with absolutely no issue and total disregard for radiation, and there appears to be absolutely no adverse effect on any of the astronauts, most outlive people never exposed to radiation.

CERN should work with NASA and find out how they successfully sent astronauts and sensitive equipment to space seemingly flawlessly (6 times manned, and countless unmanned) back in the 60's to early 70's.

I can control my car with my phone now, and the cell phone hasn't been around that long, yet somehow space exploration still progresses at this rate.
if it was that easy in the 60's and 70's , we shouldn't be researching radiation protection at this point in time.

in terms of long range, just piggy back on NASA's tech and improve it, since they were so successful each time


I've known a couple of astronauts. They were aware of the risks they take regarding radiation exposure and were willing to take that risk for the experience of being an astronaut.

Both astronauts have suffered with cancer, most probably from their exposure.

I'd have loved to go into space but I would never pass the physical and am really not willing to risk my life on it.

NASA are trying to identify the genetic predisposition/s towards radiation resistance held by the likes of Glenn or some of the Russians and these will be new criteria for future astronaut selection.



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 05:19 PM
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a reply to: zazzafrazz

Got a bigger problem... If you're moving at any substantial speed, micro-meteors and large dust particles can just ruin your day.

Cheers - Dave



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 05:20 PM
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Doesn't it all fit together with that new EM drive ...?

Somehow they have to pass the van Allen radiation belt ,maybe parts of our solar system caused more curiosity to speed up space travel " like maybe Ceres? "
edit on 0b37America/ChicagoWed, 05 Aug 2015 17:33:37 -0500vAmerica/ChicagoWed, 05 Aug 2015 17:33:37 -05001 by 0bserver1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 05:22 PM
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a reply to: bobs_uruncle

Which is why I'm thinking there will be layers of shields for different sizes in particles to deal with. I'm wondering what kind of power source we'll use by the time we add up all the goodies needed for deep space missions.

"Shields up" is plural

edit on 5-8-2015 by pl3bscheese because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 05:30 PM
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originally posted by: Orwells Ghost
a reply to: M5xaz

And how much will that weigh?


Magnesium is quite a light weight metal. Consider 'mag' wheels on cars (actually, usually an alloy of aluminum and magnesium) they are exceptionally rigid but quite light.

Here's the Wikipedia Page on magnesium diboride.

Magnesium Diboride's mol mass is 45.93 g. By comparison, water is 18.15 g. Lead's mol mass is 207.2 g.


edit on 5/8/2015 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 05:37 PM
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originally posted by: zazzafrazz
Now we just need inertial dampeners and a warp drive



And the Neutrino drive


That way during fast travel most matter (like planets-moons-large are small mass debris fields within Nebula observed and charted and unknown and uncharted hot/cold nebula can be passed through uninterrupted)

Activates neutrino bubble fields...

Thinks if things built now in the future more perfected or ready



A neutrino (/nuːˈtriːnoʊ/ or /njuːˈtriːnoʊ/, in Italian [nɛuˈtrino]) is an electrically neutral elementary particle[4] with half-integer spin. The neutrino (meaning "little neutral one" in Italian) is denoted by the Greek letter ν (nu). All evidence suggests that neutrinos have mass but that their masses are tiny, even compared to other subatomic particles.

Neutrinos are leptons, along with the charged electrons, muons, and taus, and come in three flavors: electron neutrinos (ν
e), muon neutrinos (ν
μ), and tau neutrinos (ν
τ). Each flavor is also associated with an antiparticle, called an "antineutrino", which also has no electric charge and half-integer spin. Neutrinos are produced in a way that conserves lepton number; i.e., for every electron neutrino produced, a positron (anti-electron) is produced, and for every electron antineutrino produced, an electron is produced as well.

Neutrinos do not carry any electric charge, which means that they are not affected by the electromagnetic force that acts on charged particles, and are leptons, so they are not affected by the strong force that acts on particles inside atomic nuclei. Neutrinos are therefore affected only by the weak subatomic force and by gravity. The weak force is a very short-range interaction, and gravity is extremely weak on the subatomic scale. Thus, neutrinos typically pass through normal matter unimpeded and undetected.




Neutrinos can be created in several ways, including in certain types of radioactive decay, in nuclear reactions such as those that take place in the Sun, in nuclear reactors, when cosmic rays hit atoms and in supernovas. The majority of neutrinos in the vicinity of the earth are from nuclear reactions in the Sun. In fact, about 65 billion (6.5×1010) solar neutrinos per second pass through every square centimeter perpendicular to the direction of the Sun in the region of the Earth.[5]




posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 06:15 PM
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originally posted by: GetHyped
a reply to: odzeandennz

Reading the article helps.


Read it. I'm just astounded by the fact that this tech is being researched and looked at closely now. yes CERN wasn't here back then, but magnetic shielding isn't new at all.
just drawing stark contrast to advancement in unmanned space exploration vs manned and the tech we've developed since we sent men to the moon 6 times in just a few years and we didn't even know the full possible effect of radiation in space exploration. the gradual progression of radiation shielding doesn't make sense when compared to other say computer chip progression or television, or medicine, or communication or any other scientific branch.

and yes, I do realize its advancement is more directly proportional to funding than other scientific branches as well, but still...

sorry I digress a bit.



posted on Aug, 6 2015 @ 01:56 AM
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originally posted by: odzeandennz


The team at Cern are working on a a superconducting magnet to protect against radiation in deep space exploration.
cds.cern.ch...


I thought we developed protection years ago. we went to the moon several times with absolutely no issue and total disregard for radiation, and there appears to be absolutely no adverse effect on any of the astronauts, most outlive people never exposed to radiation.

CERN should work with NASA and find out how they successfully sent astronauts and sensitive equipment to space seemingly flawlessly (6 times manned, and countless unmanned) back in the 60's to early 70's.

I can control my car with my phone now, and the cell phone hasn't been around that long, yet somehow space exploration still progresses at this rate.
if it was that easy in the 60's and 70's , we shouldn't be researching radiation protection at this point in time.

in terms of long range, just piggy back on NASA's tech and improve it, since they were so successful each time

Except everything you wrote is simply wrong. They dealt with it by limiting the time of exposure and with trajectory adjustments. Hard to limit time of exposure on a much longer journey though, say to Mars.

www.popsci.com...



posted on Aug, 6 2015 @ 01:58 AM
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originally posted by: odzeandennzthe gradual progression of radiation shielding doesn't make sense when compared to other say computer chip progression or television, or medicine, or communication or any other scientific branch.

and yes, I do realize its advancement is more directly proportional to funding than other scientific branches as well, but still...

sorry I digress a bit.

It's also about need. Necessity is the mother of all invention. Manned missions are really worthless, and with no need for them, there was no point in researching shielding for manned missions.



posted on Aug, 6 2015 @ 07:47 AM
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originally posted by: Orwells Ghost
a reply to: M5xaz

And how much will that weigh?


Doesn't matter how much, in space it will weigh nothing. The only point of interest will be if the water comes from Earth, then the weight matters.

If you can find the water elsewhere in space, from a passing comet perhaps, then it's fine.

Or else, they could use their new rail gun tech and literally shoot the water into orbit, collect it and then use it to make rad shields, drinking, oxygen and hydrogen for suplimental electricity generation and fuel.



posted on Aug, 6 2015 @ 01:07 PM
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a reply to: MysterX

Mass still exists out in space, and all the physical laws surrounding it still apply. Unless you plan on giving up delta-v, every ton of water carried is a ton less food, fuel, materiel etc.


edit on 6-8-2015 by Orwells Ghost because: spelling



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