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The Pyramid of Xochicalco - Does it tell the history of Atlantis?

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posted on Aug, 13 2015 @ 02:51 PM
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Quetzalcoatl, 900CE
Oannes, 280BCE from Adapa 2500BCE
Viracocha, 1000CE
Thunupa, 1000CE
Gucumatz, 1000 CE
Kukulkan, 200CE
Naylamp 1000ce

As Viracocha, Thunupa, Gucumatz, Naylamp and Quetzalcoatl are all from the same period and are simply different names or aspects for the same feathered serpent deity, of which the earliest version was Kukulkan we are back to the same claim you made which was shown to be laughably fallacious earlier
That of Quetzalcoatl and Oannes and as I already earlier proved with facts supported by credible links (as opposed to your delusional rhetoric) that Oannes is simply a later name of Adapa who was a fisherman, this leaves you with your claims exposed for what they actually are. The latter day ravings of a pseudohistoruan who doesn't know what he's talking about.

Its about time you actually did some reseatch instead of relying on the ravings of a bunch of journalists who know even less about history than you do




I wonder whether you actually get paid for this,

Yup, there you go, losing all your credibility by pretending that I am a paid disinfo agent, here just to stop your nonsense form becoming the truth, when in fact, you wouldn't know the truth if it kicked you in the ass.

Quick, now, rush of and read fingerprints of the Gods for a retort. lol


edit on 13-8-2015 by Marduk because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 13 2015 @ 04:26 PM
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The earliest depictions of the feathered serpent in Mesoamerica date to the Olmec culture, about 1200 BC. In addition to Monument 19 of La Venta, which I have already referenced in my previous post, the rock art in the Juxtlahuaca cave might be the earliest depiction of this deity in the Olmec world. It is to be noted that the iconography of the feathered serpent appears already fully developed in these early depictions, suggesting a much longer period of gestation, of which little however survives in the archaeological record.

The feathered serpent was later incorporated in the mythology of other Mesoamerican cultures with various names, such as Quetzalcoatl (Aztec), Kukulkan (Maya), etc.
There is no proof that these myths penetrated as far South as to influence the legend of Viracocha, Thunupa or Naylamp, which might have had an independent, although possibly parallel genesis.
edit on 13-8-2015 by NeoIkonEpifanes because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 13 2015 @ 04:50 PM
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originally posted by: NeoIkonEpifanes
The earliest depictions of the feathered serpent in Mesoamerica date to the Olmec culture, about 1200 BC. In addition to Monument 19 of La Venta, which I have already referenced in my previous post, the rock art in the Juxtlahuaca cave might be the earliest depiction of this deity in the Olmec world. It is to be noted that the iconography of the feathered serpent appears already fully developed in these early depictions, suggesting a much longer period of gestation, of which little however survives in the archaeological record.

The feathered serpent was later incorporated in the mythology of other Mesoamerican cultures with various names, such as Quetzalcoatl (Aztec), Kukulkan (Maya), etc.
There is no proof that these myths penetrated as far South as to influence the legend of Viracocha, Thunupa or Naylamp, which might have had an independent, although possibly parallel genesis.


Finally you're starting to see reason, but you're wrong about the influence not going that far south, in fact all the contemporary groups traded with each other, either directly or through middle men in the same way that the Mesopotamians traded with Egypt, Africa and India. Civilisations do not exist in a vacuum. You need look no further than their "pyramids" and their similar Gods with similar descriptions to see that. Absolute proof can be found in the Tarascan language of Western Mexico, which is related to Quecha, the language of the Inca.

You see, Pseudo historians will claim as you tried to, that the similar Gods are all a result of a Master culture travelling around the area contacting all the groups and teaching them the arts of civilisation, whereas real history teaches that these similarities are a result of later trade or conquest (cultural diffusion). The former has no evidence, the latter is totally and irrevocably supported.

A good example from Mesopotamia would be the sacking of Babylon by the Hittites around 1531BCE. In which the victorious Hittites stole the cult statue of Bel Marduk from Babylon and took it back to Hattusa (their capital city) and worshipped it in the same manner as the Babylonians, because when everybody is a religious polytheistic fundamentalist, it pays not to annoy the Gods.



edit on 13-8-2015 by Marduk because: (no reason given)

edit on 13-8-2015 by Marduk because: (no reason given)



 
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