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Kentucky sheriff's department sued over handcuffing of eight-year-old boy

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posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 09:30 AM
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“You can do what we have asked you to do, or you can suffer the consequences."

That's what the officer told the kid before he put handcuffs on him, linking his arms behind his back with the cuffs attached to his biceps.

The mentality here is apparent. For crying out loud, the boy ways fifty pounds wet. Your in a classroom, grab a book, read him a story, give him a hug.

Source

The individual in question is an eight-year-old boy, weighing 52lb and standing 3½ft tall, who suffers from ADHD and post-traumatic stress disorder. When the police officer stands back, it becomes clear in the video that the boy has been handcuffed above the elbow – his wrists are so tiny that the police officer has placed the boy’s arms behind his back and locked the handcuffs around his biceps.


In my opinion he should not have a job. Could only imagine the mentality he has on the streets when faced with real problems.

Stupid is as stupid does.




posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 09:31 AM
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a reply to: Daedal
On the plus side.... they didn't shoot him.



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 09:38 AM
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I'll take the officer's side here. I used to work with mentally handicapped children. Every so often some of them would throw a fit, where they would flail their arms, punch, kick and even bite. Our procedure was to physically restrain them so they didn't hurt themselves or others. If anything I blame the school for not having restraints designed for children.



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 09:40 AM
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a reply to: Daedal

If we did that to our own children we would be charged with felony child abuse.



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 09:44 AM
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originally posted by: JIMC5499
I'll take the officer's side here. I used to work with mentally handicapped children. Every so often some of them would throw a fit, where they would flail their arms, punch, kick and even bite. Our procedure was to physically restrain them so they didn't hurt themselves or others. If anything I blame the school for not having restraints designed for children.


I worked in mental health for a number of years, and was trained in PMAB to be able to handle this kind of stuff without having to use mechanical restraint.



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 09:49 AM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

That's good. I was a volunteer in high school. I didn't have this training and I'll bet neither did this Deputy. Sometimes you have to do the best you can with what you have. This is one of the reasons that I don't like cops in schools. If they are going to do this, they need training like what you received.



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 09:51 AM
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a reply to: JIMC5499

The officer could have used better judgment. Stay clear until the parents arrive, let those who are trained handle the situation.

No need for cuffs.



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 09:52 AM
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We use to put ourselves in cuffs for fun. I am usually all over the cops but this one just seems meh. no harm no foul.



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 09:58 AM
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originally posted by: JIMC5499
I'll take the officer's side here. I used to work with mentally handicapped children. Every so often some of them would throw a fit, where they would flail their arms, punch, kick and even bite. Our procedure was to physically restrain them so they didn't hurt themselves or others. If anything I blame the school for not having restraints designed for children.


When you worked with disabled people did they mind you using the word "Handicapped"? We don't use that word in the UK for decades now as It is widely believed that this word is derived from Victorian times, when many disabled people had to beg for money and so went “cap in hand”

Back on topic, I was a social worker many years ago with troubled children and disabled children and we were taught how to restrain a child in a worse case scenario. Handcuffing was not one of the ways, and it appalling that an LEO does not have enough nonce to realise the damage he could/would have caused this 8 year old who was already suffering PST.



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 10:03 AM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

I agree. Training is critical, especially for law enforcement when dealing with the disabled or mentally ill people.



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 10:22 AM
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a reply to: flammadraco

We were not as politically correct when I did this in 1979-80. Handicapped was the correct term then and I believe it still is now. I have a nephew with Spina Bifida and he is referred to as "handicapped".



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 10:26 AM
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originally posted by: flammadraco
When you worked with disabled people did they mind you using the word "Handicapped"? We don't use that word in the UK for decades now as It is widely believed that this word is derived from Victorian times, when many disabled people had to beg for money and so went “cap in hand”


Political-Correctness Police are much worse than a cop who would restrain an apparently out-of-control 8-year-old who appears to have been unruly to the point of possibly harming himself or others.

I have a child with relatively severe ADHD, plus Asperger's, and there are absolute times when he loses his ever-loving mind and has zero control over his emotions and actions. While that is most likely the Asperger's causing that, it's not above consideration that ADHD mixed with PTSD can cause the same thing.

But here's catch-22...had the officer put his hands on him to physically restrain him instead, I'm sure someone would be bitching about that, too. I do think that leaving those cuffs on him for 15 minutes was probably excessive (but I wasn't there and didn't witness the kid's actions for those 15 minutes), but needing to restrain an 8-year-old with these disabilities is not unheard of.


Back on topic, I was a social worker many years ago with troubled children and disabled children and we were taught how to restrain a child in a worse case scenario. Handcuffing was not one of the ways, and it appalling that an LEO does not have enough nonce to realise the damage he could/would have caused this 8 year old who was already suffering PST.


It's quite possible that your assumption that the officer had the information that the child suffered from PTSD is incorrect, but even so, if he didn't have the training to do it any other way, then 20/20 hindsight is not the best vision in which to be viewing this scenario.



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 10:29 AM
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a reply to: Daedal

What a hero! Teaching our children how disgraceful our authority figures really are!
edit on 4-8-2015 by rockintitz because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 10:38 AM
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originally posted by: SlapMonkey

originally posted by: flammadraco
When you worked with disabled people did they mind you using the word "Handicapped"? We don't use that word in the UK for decades now as It is widely believed that this word is derived from Victorian times, when many disabled people had to beg for money and so went “cap in hand”


Political-Correctness Police are much worse than a cop who would restrain an apparently out-of-control 8-year-old who appears to have been unruly to the point of possibly harming himself or others.
.


Really... you have a disabled son and you think that someone asking about the word "handicapped" is worse than an LEO handcuffing an 8 year old child???

As a parent of a disabled child, are you happy that the word "handicapped" is used towards your son? despite it being a Victorian word to describe disabled people with caps in hand begging for money to survive?

Really????




posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 10:42 AM
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originally posted by: flammadraco

originally posted by: SlapMonkey

originally posted by: flammadraco
When you worked with disabled people did they mind you using the word "Handicapped"? We don't use that word in the UK for decades now as It is widely believed that this word is derived from Victorian times, when many disabled people had to beg for money and so went “cap in hand”


Political-Correctness Police are much worse than a cop who would restrain an apparently out-of-control 8-year-old who appears to have been unruly to the point of possibly harming himself or others.
.


Really... you have a disabled son and you think that someone asking about the word "handicapped" is worse than an LEO handcuffing an 8 year old child???

As a parent of a disabled child, are you happy that the word "handicapped" is used towards your son? despite it being a Victorian word to describe disabled people with caps in hand begging for money to survive?

Really????



Oh jeez...

why not start a thread on it, rather than derail this one? Etymology isn't really a Posse Comitatus thing.



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 10:42 AM
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a reply to: Daedal

The cops can't cuff him.

But if you smack your unruly child, the cops will cuff you, and if you take away an unruly child privileges, they'll throw a tantrum and break stuff.

Apparently their isn't a right way to discipline a problem child anymore.



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 10:44 AM
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If there's any justice this kid will grow up to be a domestic terrorist and kill this same cop in his attack. That's what happens when powerful people bully disadvantaged people as kids- they start thinking about how they're gonna even the score when they're big enough to have a gun and cuffs too. I'll probably draw fire for saying that, but you all liked the movie Braveheart and it's the exact same story.



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 10:46 AM
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originally posted by: JIMC5499
I'll take the officer's side here. I used to work with mentally handicapped children. Every so often some of them would throw a fit, where they would flail their arms, punch, kick and even bite. Our procedure was to physically restrain them so they didn't hurt themselves or others. If anything I blame the school for not having restraints designed for children.


Since when is having ADHD considered being mentally handicapped? It's a behavioral problem, not a handicap.

I grew up with ADHD and still have issues with ADD as an adult, but I sure as heck am not mentally handicapped.

The problem with this kid and most kids these days is lack of respect for adults. It's not a mental handicap, but more of a parental handicap. Kids need their a$$ beat these days, and yes I am a father and yes I do spank my daughter. She is on the fast track of learning how to respect adults.



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 10:49 AM
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a reply to: rockintitz

The issue encompasses other problems that officers are trained to do. Training cops to shoot first ask questions later is a problem in my opinion, and this issue is exacerbated by the fact that not only do you shoot first ask questions later, but when you do, regardless of circumstances, protection is offered.

Source

When police officers shoot people under questionable circumstances, Dr. Lewinski is often there to defend their actions. Among the most influential voices on the subject, he has testified in or consulted in nearly 200 cases over the last decade or so and has helped justify countless shootings around the country.

His conclusions are consistent: The officer acted appropriately, even when shooting an unarmed person. Even when shooting someone in the back. Even when witness testimony, forensic evidence or video footage contradicts the officer’s story.


This mentality has too change. If an officer is trained this way and also knows he can be offered protection from prosecution, what's the chances he won't shoot first ask questions later.



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 10:53 AM
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originally posted by: The Vagabond
If there's any justice this kid will grow up to be a domestic terrorist and kill this same cop in his attack. That's what happens when powerful people bully disadvantaged people as kids- they start thinking about how they're gonna even the score when they're big enough to have a gun and cuffs too. I'll probably draw fire for saying that, but you all liked the movie Braveheart and it's the exact same story.


Dang.. When i was in the 4th grade my 6th grade sister tricked me into putting on handcuffs while we were walking home from school.

Then she took off running and made me walk a frikin mile home alone with handcuffs on. I am now 43 and dont want to kill her.

But I did then.. Chances are this 8 year old kid will look back on this and just shake his head at himself.



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