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US tornado count at its lowest 3-year total since 1950

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posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 10:39 PM
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I was thinking about the relatively calm weather we have had this year(and in years past), and decided to take a look and see what the stats have to say. The main reason I bring this up is that we have had MANY politicians/climate scientists use current weather as an argument for the legitimacy of AGW, and thus the urgent need to reduce CO2 emissions.

The story in the headline is from Jan 2015, so it is not taking into account this years tornado season, but I will divulge into that as well as the reduction in hurricanes.

The number of tornadoes and the intensity of these storms has been decreasing dramatically over the last 4 years. Now remember, this was being used as a main argument for the validity of AGW back in 2011. I don't think using a small sample of years as proof is logical, but since the top climate scientists have, I might as well also.

Considering the number of storm watchers has increased as well as the population, and technology to identify tornadoes, it would only make sense that the number of tornadoes increase every year. Now obviously the 2015 tornado season is still underway, but I wanted to give you an idea of how this year is stacking up to years past.

In 2014, there were a total of 888 confirmed tornadoes. There were 20 EF3's, 7 EF4's, and 0 EF5's.
In 2015, so far we have had 486 confirmed tornadoes. There were 10 EF3's, 1 EF4, and 0 EF5's.

There is no doubt that we will have many more tornadoes before the year is through, but the most prolific tornado generating months are past us.

It looks like 2015 is going to be even quieter than the last 3 years, which is simply absurd given the rhetoric of the climate alarmist community. We might need to go back to the 1800's to find a time with fewer tornadoes here soon, and that really isn't fair as hundreds of tornadoes would have gone unnoticed every year back then.

Now onto Cyclones/Tropical Storms/Hurricane statistics.

It is only within the last 50 years that technology has reached the point where we are able to identify accurately the amount and intensity of hurricanes/cyclones/tropical storms etc...

Without satellite technology we really had little clue as to what was going on in our oceans. This doesn't affect recent records, but is something to consider when comparing current data to historical data.

Now, a big claim by the climate alarmists as to why warming has pretty much stopped for the last 20 years, has been that the oceans have been soaking up all of that heat. Warmer water = more energy to create more violent storms. If true, it really is the perfect recipe for disastrous hurricane seasons. Knowing all of this, the number of hurricanes as well as their intensity should be increasing exponentially. Let's take a look at the Atlantic hurricane season.

From 2010-2012 we had above average overall storm activity when compared to previous years. In 2012 of course we had Hurricane Sandy, and all 3 seasons were basically a tie for third most active, at least at some during the year. Obviously it fits in with the 2011 tornado season being above average, so it's looking like the rhetoric being used by climate alarmists at that point can be somewhat backed up with actual stats.

Why don't we take a look at the data -

From 2010-2012 we had an average of 4 Major hurricanes each year. The total number of hurricanes was 29, cyclones 60, and tropical storms 57. Above average, but nothing serious when compared to hurricane data over the last 50 years.

Now when we look at 2013, we see that there were 0 Major hurricanes, ONLY 2 total hurricanes, 15 cyclones, and 14 tropical storms.
Similar stats are seen in 2014 with 2 major hurricanes, ONLY 6 total hurricanes, ONLY 8 tropical storms, and ONLY 9 cyclones.

Of course the 2015 season is still ongoing, and since we have not reached the peak month for activity, I am sure we will see a few more storms before it is done. Let's take a look anyways and see where we are at. So far there have been 0 Major hurricanes, 0 total hurricanes, 2 tropical storms, and 2 cyclones.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


So what can we take away from this data? The number of tornadoes/hurricanes is decreasing. The number of deadly/powerful tornadoes/hurricanes is decreasing, and has been for years. Again this is a small data set, but climate scientists/politicians felt the need to use recent weather as an indication that AGW is real and very dangerous. This thread is only set out to debunk those claims, as nobody in the MSM, or media of any kind seems to want to report on the truth.


Main article referenced - US tornado count at its lowest 3 year total since 1950
edit on 3-8-2015 by c0gN1t1v3D1ss0nanC3 because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 10:49 PM
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a reply to: c0gN1t1v3D1ss0nanC3

Very well said!



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 10:53 PM
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Since about 2005 , Georgia has had overly cold , snowy winters. And in those 10 years we have saw more ice and snow than my previous 40 years combined. Yet in the summer it has been relatively cool (in the lower 80s.it usually is about 92+) .
But we have had our share of tornadoes as well in those 10 years. They fall within the March - May period. This year , and I will have to verify , but I do not believe we have had a single one (knock on wood).
Thanks for reminding me of that. I hadnt really thought about it till I read your post



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 11:04 PM
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Nice thread c0gN1t1v3D1ss0nanC3!
I had made a similar thread a couple of years ago about tropical cyclones down here in Australia.
You will see the same thing is happening down here too. Between 1971 and 1980 there was 128 cyclones, between 2001 and 2010 there was 96 cyclones.
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 11:26 PM
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If the statistics hold true, then great news for the people in the heartland that have to put up with these menacing storms every year. One thing the statistics also show however, is that these storms, while fewer in number, are getting larger in size. Big tornadoes do big damage, so we can only hope that this is not a sustainable statistic as well.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 11:47 PM
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a reply to: charlyv

As someone living in the Heartland, I agree with you on it being good news. As far as your claim that storms are getting larger, I would have to disagree.

Which storms are you referring to?

Again, I am using a small sample year size as that was what was used by climate scientists. So, over the past 3 1/2 years storms have been getting less powerful.

I guess I am assuming you mean large/powerful by the EF scale. So EF4's and EF5's would be classified as large and powerful. If that is your idea of large storms, like I stated in the OP, those kinds of tornadoes have been drastically reduced over the last 4 years.



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 03:34 AM
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I'm no meteorologist, but I'm GUESSING the decrease is due to less cold fronts during the season... I could be way off, but I thought most 'nadoes happen when warm and cold fronts converge/collide... (I'm in Alaska, and although I'm new here, I'm hearing from locals it's warmer, or warmer for longer, than usual...

That being said, I would expect the season for the twisters to migrate earlier and later... Kinda like splitting the season down the middle, and driving a wedge between the halves. (of the season)

I do think "climate change" is happening, but I'm also one of those who think it's more of a natural change, MAYBE helped a little by people. Although maybe not as many of a certain kind of storm, it'll probably be countered by more weather of a different kind...

That is my unedumacated take... I dunno, literally.



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 03:37 AM
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a reply to: c0gN1t1v3D1ss0nanC3

I don't want to be hyperbolic or extreme so please forgive me, we are all going to die!!!



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 11:32 AM
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originally posted by: c0gN1t1v3D1ss0nanC3
a reply to: charlyv

As someone living in the Heartland, I agree with you on it being good news. As far as your claim that storms are getting larger, I would have to disagree.

Which storms are you referring to?

Again, I am using a small sample year size as that was what was used by climate scientists. So, over the past 3 1/2 years storms have been getting less powerful.

I guess I am assuming you mean large/powerful by the EF scale. So EF4's and EF5's would be classified as large and powerful. If that is your idea of large storms, like I stated in the OP, those kinds of tornadoes have been drastically reduced over the last 4 years.



Hi,
On the contrary, there are many of the top tier weather centers that seem to agree that although the individual number is down, the intensity factor is up. I guess, the definitive answer is to live where you do, as nothing beats the beholder...

Anyway: AccuWeather on Storm Intensity: AccuWeather



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 01:55 PM
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a reply to: charlyv

There does not seem to be any factual evidence that the intensity factor of storms is up.

From your article -


Is a Warming Climate Causing More Active Severe Weather Already?
Before examining how climate change may affect severe weather in the future, it is important to analyze whether the frequency or strength of severe weather has changed already with rising temperatures.
There is no strong evidence to support severe weather becoming stronger, more frequent or more widespread during the past 50 years in the United States. One of the reasons that the change in severe weather is hard to track is the fact that the reporting systems have changed so much over time.


Do you have any specific statistics that show storms are increasing in intensity?



posted on Aug, 6 2015 @ 08:37 PM
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a reply to: Danke

Agree that article is not written well, as it starts off on one side and digresses with insinuation.

A better, and more scientific group of statistics:

Environmental Scientists speak out



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