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Breaking From NASA! "Mysterious Group of Asteroids."

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posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 02:55 PM
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a reply to: wildespace

I always thought she was one of the best looking scientists




posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 03:12 PM
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a reply to: ManFromEurope
If nothing else your response made my day! I think Hilary would do great in space!!



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 03:20 PM
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originally posted by: Chadwickus
a reply to: egidio88

It's a timelapse image..


The asteroid Euphrosyne glides across a field of background stars in this time-lapse view from NASA's WISE spacecraft. WISE obtained the images used to create this view over a period of about a day around May 17, 2010, during which it observed the asteroid four times.

...The moving asteroid appears as a string of red dots because it is much cooler than the distant background stars. Stars have temperatures in the thousands of degrees, but the asteroid is cooler than room temperature. Thus the stars are represented by shorter wavelength (hotter) blue colors in this view, while the asteroid is shown in longer wavelength (cooler) reddish colors.



photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov...






OK... all though at the same Date 8/3/15


Aug. 3, 2015

A Mysterious Group of Asteroid Outcasts

High above the plane of our solar system, near the asteroid-rich abyss between Mars and Jupiter, scientists have found a unique family of space rocks. These interplanetary oddballs are the Euphrosyne (pronounced you-FROH-seh-nee) asteroids, and by any measure they have been distant, dark and mysterious -- until now. Distributed at the outer edge of the asteroid belt, the Euphrosynes have an unusual orbital path that juts well above the ecliptic, the equator of the solar system. The asteroid after which they are named, Euphrosyne -- for an ancient Greek goddess of mirth -- is about 156 miles (260 kilometers) across and is one of the 10 largest asteroids in the main belt. Current-day Euphrosyne is thought to be a remnant of a massive collision about 700 million years ago that formed the family of smaller asteroids bearing its name. Scientists think this event was one of the last great collisions in the solar system.

www.nasa.gov...

So we found out that the Picture is Just the Time elapse of the Biggest one out of the 10 ..

MYSTERIOUS!! Asteroid Objects


ahh Where is the Mysterious 9 others! ?

Where are those, Photos ! seeing it's a supposed Group


So what we have here is The article is Right.. just the Photo is Misleading acting as a Group from a Time elapse of just One out of the 10, that NASA is speaking about ,

a bit confusing as NASA says Euphrosynes is a Asteroid then NASA says its a Asteroid Family Group..

more likely a article error , as there is 1,400 in the Euphrosynes Group ,



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 03:39 PM
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Dot dot dot dash.....V for victory



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 03:48 PM
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originally posted by: AdmireTheDistance
a reply to: WeAre0ne

Care to point out where exactly I was rude and condescending?


Oh, come on.



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 03:53 PM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

Thoroughly terrifying, I like it.



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 04:17 PM
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I'm not saying it's Aliens , but it's Aliens



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 07:45 PM
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...
edit on 4-8-2015 by IlluminatiTechnician because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 08:20 PM
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a reply to: Wolfenz

It doesn't say anywhere in the article that they are looking at "10 mysterious asteroids". They say that the "asteroid after which they are named, Euphrosyne [...] is one of the 10 largest asteroids in the main belt."

Seems like a lot of people jumping the sensationalism gun, or criticising NASA, haven't read the article carefuly enough.



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 08:21 PM
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Someone posted this in my thread about doom porn.

www.abovetopsecret.com...

The part of google sky that used to be blacked out.




edit on 4-8-2015 by DaRAGE because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2015 @ 08:31 PM
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originally posted by: DaRAGE
Someone posted this in my thread about doom porn.

www.abovetopsecret.com...

The part of google sky that used to be blacked out.




And I have no idea what the image of the asteroid has anything to do with the supposedly-uncovered part of Google Sky (which is still covered, by the way, check this thread).



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 02:03 AM
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originally posted by: wildespace
a reply to: Wolfenz

It doesn't say anywhere in the article that they are looking at "10 mysterious asteroids". They say that the "asteroid after which they are named, Euphrosyne [...] is one of the 10 largest asteroids in the main belt."

Seems like a lot of people jumping the sensationalism gun, or criticising NASA, haven't read the article carefuly enough.


Actually there are calling Euphrosyne an Asteroid and also calling the Group of Astroids Euphrosynes Note: the S


As a result of their study, the JPL researchers believe the Euphrosynes may be the source of some of the dark NEOs found to be on long, highly inclined orbits. They found that, through gravitational interactions with Saturn, Euphrosyne asteroids can evolve into NEOs over timescales of millions of years.


(s) more then One


Read it again ,

They said Family of Space Rocks .

and that particular One is from that family .


High above the plane of our solar system, near the asteroid-rich abyss between Mars and Jupiter, scientists have found a unique family of space rocks. These interplanetary oddballs are the Euphrosyne (pronounced you-FROH-seh-nee) asteroids, and by any measure they have been distant, dark and mysterious -- until now.



Technically they are looking at all 1,400 Euphrosyne including those 10 Asteroids !



The 1,400 Euphrosyne asteroids studied by Masiero and his colleagues turned out to be large and dark, with highly inclined and elliptical orbits. These traits make them good candidates for the source of some of the dark NEOs the NEOWISE telescope detects and discovers, particularly those that also have highly inclined orbits.



"The Euphrosynes have a gentle resonance with the orbit of Saturn that slowly moves these objects, eventually turning some of them into NEOs," said Joseph Masiero, JPL's lead scientist on the Euphrosynes study. "This particular gravitational resonance tends to push some of the larger fragments of the Euphrosyne family into near-Earth space."

www.nasa.gov...

objects = more then one


So there is 1,400 NEO's aka Asteroids being Studied! by Masiero and his colleagues
out 700,000, of the Asteroids in the Belt

So Let just call it the Group Euphrosynes..
and not just one particular big asteroid.



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 09:04 AM
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Cool pics.....



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 10:44 AM
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That's the confusion you get when you only discuss asteroids with half the facts --
a half-asteroid story.



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 11:05 AM
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a reply to: egidio88

They know what this is...a little trickle at a time.
edit on 5-8-2015 by Staroth because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 11:12 AM
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a reply to: Staroth

Yes, they do know what they are.

Asteroids.

Very slow trickle I guess, since the first asteroid was discovered in 1801



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 11:16 AM
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originally posted by: Chadwickus
a reply to: Staroth

Yes, they do know what they are.

Asteroids.

Very slow trickle I guess, since the first asteroid was discovered in 1801

And to clarify, the image in the OP is not even "asteroids" [plural]. That image is an "asteroid" [singular].

It is four time-lapse exposures of the same asteroid as it moves through space.



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 11:31 AM
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And asteroids are grouped by the orbit they inhabit. From the study the original article was talking about, here's a graphic showing asteroids in the outer Main Belt. The Euphrosyne family is at the top, with a high inclination.




Fig. 1.— Proper orbital inclination vs proper semimajor axis for all asteroids in the outer Main Belt
(dots) and Euphrosyne family members (large squares). Colors indicate visible geometric albedo
following the colorbar. Vertical features are a result of weak resonances and a feature common
to synthetic proper orbital element catalogs. Horizontal features are asteroid families. Orbital
elements, albedos, and family identifications taken from Masiero et al. (2013).


From Wikipedia's entry on Asteroid Families, here's a similar graphic showing the names of major families. Note this graph doesn't show the Euphrosyne family, because their inclination is higher than the maximum shown.




posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 11:39 AM
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originally posted by: Wolfenz

ahh Where is the Mysterious 9 others! ?


The article says Euphrosyne is one of the "10 largest asteroids in the main belt." The other 9 largest asteroids (by mass: 1 Ceres, 4 Vesta, 2 Pallas, 10 Hygiea, 704 Interamnia, 511 Davida, 532 Herculina, 15 Eunomia, 3 Juno) are in different families.



a bit confusing as NASA says Euphrosynes is a Asteroid then NASA says its a Asteroid Family Group..

more likely a article error , as there is 1,400 in the Euphrosynes Group ,
Asteroid families are named after the first asteroid discovered in that particular family (which tends to be the largest asteroid in the family, since larger objects are easier to find). So 31 Euphrosyne is the major asteroid in the Euphrosyne family.



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 12:43 PM
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Yes, from what I can tell, the "10" are not asteroids individually but asteroid families, with Euprhosyne being one of them, and the one the article deals with specifically. There are many more than ten asteroids in said family. There's nothing sensational or unusual about this. The only important revelation is that this could explain one potential source of so called "dark" NEOs.

There are not 10 (or 4) mysterious identical asteroids floating out there perfectly aligned, or heading to Earth. Not sure how that was ever inferred from the article. An interesting study, though.

Peace.







 
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