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Anyone discovered anything inherently worng with Windows 10?

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posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 12:52 PM
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I have it down loaded and so far I cannot find anything covert in it.

Have any of you found anything that would be an issue with privacy or if the OS tracks or hears us without our permission?

Or far that matter any thing that makes this OS a problem?




posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 12:56 PM
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Occasionally a windows pops up saying "I will eat your soul." but I haven't noticed any performance issues from it.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 12:57 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

I don't know about the full version but the trial version tracks literally everything you do. It's being positioned as not that sinister since Microsoft is being upfront about it and it is only a trial version, but you can leave the up to yourself to decide if its a bad thing or not.

The Windows 10 Preview Tracks Everything You Do (And That's the Point)


But the accompanying privacy statement reveals a couple of things that not everyone might expect to share, including voice recordings and the text users type.

You typically wouldn't expect an operating system to monitor pretty much everything you were doing on a computer and beam the details back to its creators, which is what some people claim is the case here. Hacker News wrote that by downloading the trial, “you've all but signed away your soul !!,” while WinBeta ominously warned that “Microsoft may be collecting a lot more feedback from you behind the scenes.”

However, while it's true that the OS preview gathers a lot more data than you might first expect, Microsoft is at least transparent about the whole thing. The real lesson here is the importance of reading the licensing agreement—and making up your own mind whether the exchange of data for services is worth a peek at the next Windows.

The Microsoft statement explains that, “Examples of data we collect include your name, email address, preferences and interests; browsing, search and file history; phone call and SMS data; device configuration and sensor data; and application usage.”

It goes on to list that Microsoft may collect “voice information and use it for purposes such as improving speech processing,” via a speech-to-text feature that you might use; and that they may pool what you type on your keyboard “for purposes such as improving autocomplete and spellcheck features.”



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 12:57 PM
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How about the coming (in a year or so) required subscription? Reason enough to stay away.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 12:59 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

I asked about my location but I declined it to fr certain thing.

Can it listen or is is automatically listening via the microphone like the Samsung Smart TV did?



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 01:00 PM
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originally posted by: sprtpilot
How about the coming (in a year or so) required subscription? Reason enough to stay away.


Can you link to that source for a yearly subscription for the OS?



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 01:07 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

I would suggest going through the T&C you signed to get the software. I don't exactly know myself because I haven't gotten it yet. I've just heard the reports about W10 doing this and had my concerns.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 01:08 PM
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originally posted by: ChesterJohn
I have it down loaded and so far I cannot find anything covert in it.

Have any of you found anything that would be an issue with privacy or if the OS tracks or hears us without our permission?

Or far that matter any thing that makes this OS a problem?


Well it wouldn't be covert if we could easily find it.

but I bet there's more data mining now.




posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 01:09 PM
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originally posted by: sprtpilot
How about the coming (in a year or so) required subscription? Reason enough to stay away.


No, Windows 10 Won’t Require a Subscription: Here’s How Microsoft Plans on Making Money Instead


Microsoft’s Windows 10 message hasn’t always been clear. They’ve declared the Windows 10 upgrade will be free for the first year and that going forward they’ll be pushing “Windows 10 as a service.

Some rumors going around say Windows 10 will require a paid subscription or a fee in the future if you want to continue using it or receiving updates. But Microsoft has said that won’t happen.



Yes, Windows 10 is Really Free For Most Computers, No Subscription Required

Windows 10 is available for free to most computers out there. Assuming your computer runs either Windows 7 Service Pack 1 or Windows 8.1, you’ll see a “Get Windows 10″ pop-up as long as you have Windows Update enabled. This allows you to reserve that free upgrade.

Even if you’re using Windows 7 without Service Pack 1 or the original version of Windows 8, you can upgrade to the latest versions of Windows 7 or 8 for free and then get your Windows 10 upgrade.

Microsoft has previously said this Windows 10 upgrade will be “free for the first year.” This means that this free offer lasts a year — from July 29, 2015 to July 29, 2016. You have a year to get your free upgrade. If you don’t upgrade by July 29, 2016 and try to upgrade on July 30, Microsoft won’t give you Windows 10 for free.

If you do upgrade within the first year, you get Windows 10 for free, permanently. You don’t have to pay anything. Even after it’s been a year, your Windows 10 installation will continue working and receiving updates as normal. You won’t have to pay for some sort of Windows 10 subscription or fee to continue using it, and you’ll even get any new features Microsft adds.


more info


Then What Exactly is “Windows 10 as a Service”?

If Windows 10 is completely free, then what is all this talk about Windows being a “service” going forward?

Well, to hear MIcrosoft tell it, they’re changing the way they develop and deliver Windows. This is tied together with Windows 10 being “the last version of Windows,” as some are saying.

Windows 10 will be updated and developed on an ongoing basis going foward. Microsoft won’t work for three years on a Windows 11 with new features and attempt to sell you an upgrade. Instead, they’ll continue adding features and improvements to Windows 10 itself on an ongoing basis. You won’t have to pay for these features. Windows 10 will just receive regular updates with the features that would otherwise have been held onto for Windows 11.

Microsoft says Windows 10 will be “always up-to-date,” and they mean it. There’s no way to turn Windows Update off.... [Read Article]
In this way, Windows 10 becomes more like Google Chrome — something that’s continually updated in the background. That’s why you can’t disable Windows Update on Windows 10 Home, and you can only delay updates on Windows 10 Professional. Microsoft wants to get all modern Windows computers on the same version of Windows and keep them updated, creating a single platform for developers to target and a single platform they have to support with security updates.

Windows 10 is more like the operating systems on a Macbook, Chromebook, iPhone or iPad. You don’t have to worry about paying to upgrade to the next version of the operating system — you just get those improvements for free.

edit on 3-8-2015 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 01:14 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

I work cyber security in a large data center for a living, I have been tasked to go over it with a fine toothed comb. Thus far I have not found anything to odd. No stranger than windows 7 or 8 anyway. It is a vast improvement over 8.x at any rate. I don't trust Microsoft or Apple for the OS they put out, I am more of a Linux kinda guy, but that's a personal call. I don't like walled garden OS ideas, the user should have freedom to use the machine they own in any fashion they see fit.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 01:18 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

All of the baked-in changes that effect security can be turned off through settings. It's a slight hassle, but not much of one. The major issues that seem to be concerning people are:

1) Cortana
2) WiFi Sense
3) Bing inclusion in a lot of things

I am on day three or four and have not had a single issue at all with Windows 10. I even got a bit malicious and tried to crash or tax it to no avail. The last version of Windows I could not deliberately overwhelm was XP.

It's a very, very solid O/S so far.

Ultimately, IMO, the security concerns are kind of moot at this point. No matter what O/S one uses, be it Linux, Windows or OSX, unless you are running full encryption on a machine that is locked down to the point of having to write your own batch programs for every little thing... then your ISP is already scanning and / or recording all of your packets anyway.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 01:47 PM
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originally posted by: sprtpilot
How about the coming (in a year or so) required subscription? Reason enough to stay away.


This was the result of a leaked PowerPoint presentation from Microsoft in Australia.

Microsoft have denied it and have said emphatically that there will be no subscription.

They have published all the costs and licensing conditions for Windows 10, to clarify the misunderstanding.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 01:53 PM
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It's free because of the intrusive anti-privacy aspects of it.

www.rt.com...

www.rt.com...



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 01:53 PM
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originally posted by: Hefficide
a reply to: ChesterJohn

All of the baked-in changes that effect security can be turned off through settings. It's a slight hassle, but not much of one. The major issues that seem to be concerning people are:

1) Cortana
2) WiFi Sense
3) Bing inclusion in a lot of things

I am on day three or four and have not had a single issue at all with Windows 10. I even got a bit malicious and tried to crash or tax it to no avail. The last version of Windows I could not deliberately overwhelm was XP.

It's a very, very solid O/S so far.

Ultimately, IMO, the security concerns are kind of moot at this point. No matter what O/S one uses, be it Linux, Windows or OSX, unless you are running full encryption on a machine that is locked down to the point of having to write your own batch programs for every little thing... then your ISP is already scanning and / or recording all of your packets anyway.





I would think that MS forcing you to use an online ID by preference is a security and privacy concern. The PC is not "personal" any longer if all the identifying data is held in the cloud.

That being said, the idea of "Windows as a service" mandates the use of decentralized security and profile.

You can lock down Windows 10 by using a local profile, turning off OneDrive, WiFi Sense, Cortana, Bing & so forth. Installing a more secure web browser & perhaps TOR but people expect to use Facebork and Twatter these days so forget anonymity.


edit on 3/8/2015 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 02:07 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut

Not true you can setup windows 10 without a Microsoft account, the option is in the create a new account screen, scroll down and there is an option to continue without it.

www.baldnerd.com...



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 02:23 PM
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I installed it on my Surface Pro 3 on release day. It does not seem near as compatible with the tablet/laptop as Windows 8.1. More sluggish and I get more errors. But I'm hopeful these bugs will be worked out pretty quickly



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 02:32 PM
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originally posted by: Hushabye
It's free because of the intrusive anti-privacy aspects of it.

www.rt.com...

www.rt.com...


It's free because they have to compete.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 02:43 PM
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I'm sticking with Windows 95, thanks.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 03:18 PM
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originally posted by: ChesterJohn

originally posted by: sprtpilot
How about the coming (in a year or so) required subscription? Reason enough to stay away.


Can you link to that source for a yearly subscription for the OS?


Google it, there are (too) many. Microsoft has been asked directly about this and refused to say it will not go to some sort of subscription model. Whether like Office is already going, or via a charge based on the level of service and receipt of updates/patches, etc., would you trust MS? LOL Not me.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 03:25 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

This is not a fault of Windows 10, but be careful about this...

Scammers Capitalize on Windows 10



Capitalising on this update fervor, some scammers are now sending users an email about the free upgrade to Windows 10 which, in fact, is an attempt at locking you out of your data - pending a ransom amount, of course. The email looks like it has been sent from update@microsoft.com and goes over the new OS, finally ending with an exhortation for users to upgrade now. That's where the problem comes in.
...
Running the file results in the above prompt and will encrypt all your files and lock you out of your data. You'll need to pay the scammers if you want to have any chance of retrieving it - there's also a 96 hour clock attached to the 'offer'.



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