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The Pyramid Network

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posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 05:41 PM
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Soon after coming across an old 1978 book about pyramid alignments in Ancient Mexico and their supposed connections with UFO sightings, I become interested in the subject and started tracing possible alignments of ancient sites using Google Maps.

Although some of this research is still very much a work in progress, it has become apparent that these alignments are real and seem to extend over an enormous area of ancient Mesoamerica (even though, I suspect, similar principles might have inspired the positioning of other sacred sites around the world). Not only is the accuracy of these alignments astonishing for the time, but they also suggest that, whoever designed their pattern hundreds, if not thousands of years ago, must have possessed a very profound knowledge of the principles of geodesy and cartography, well in advance of what is commonly ascribed to ancient civilizations.

Here is an overview of some of the alignments that I have discovered in the area around Mexico City, which is only a very small portion of a vast pyramid network that seems to extend over all of Mesoamerica, and possibly beyond (more on this later).
This is the history of the discovery of an ancient code, which has laid forgotten for the past 500 years or more:

The Pyramid Network - Part I




posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 06:12 PM
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Its just amazing, combined with the Woolworth Alignments you may have something
see map
badarchaeology.files.wordpress.com...
Of course, your researcher wasn't as good as mine, I can see quite a few sites that he has missed out from his Aztec map,



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 08:15 PM
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I enjoyed the post very much, you've got yourself a new reader for your blog. What I would like to know however, is why the Aztecs' proported geodetic capablities have not manifested themselves in any other ways. If their capabilities in the field were really this advanced for an ancient civilization then why was it only being used for construction? Why do we not see detailed maps of the South American continent or evidence of the Aztecs taking to the oceans with what I'm guessing would be immensely proficient navigation tools?



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 06:51 AM
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I'm sorry, this is just a map where someone has cherry picked sites to connect lines to. It ignores the hundreds of sites that don't fit the theory. You can do this with any buildings from churches to Woolworth stores as I posted earlier. There is no more credibility to this than any other badly thought out fringe idea



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 12:34 PM
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originally posted by: atomadelica
I enjoyed the post very much, you've got yourself a new reader for your blog. What I would like to know however, is why the Aztecs' proported geodetic capablities have not manifested themselves in any other ways. If their capabilities in the field were really this advanced for an ancient civilization then why was it only being used for construction? Why do we not see detailed maps of the South American continent or evidence of the Aztecs taking to the oceans with what I'm guessing would be immensely proficient navigation tools?


This won't be the only contradiction of the Aztec civilization.
The Aztecs were a relatively primitive people, likely originating from the North-American South-West. During their migrations South, however, they came to incorporate several myths, knowledge and traditions from their conquered people. Much of what the Aztecs knew about pyramid building and monumental architecture was derived from the Toltecs, which in turn derived it from Teotihuacan and the mysterious Olmecs.
Also, the Aztec civilization was struck by Spanish conquest in the middle of its flourishing. Probably the fate of the New World would have been very different otherwise.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 12:51 PM
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originally posted by: Marduk
Its just amazing, combined with the Woolworth Alignments you may have something
see map
badarchaeology.files.wordpress.com...
Of course, your researcher wasn't as good as mine, I can see quite a few sites that he has missed out from his Aztec map,


What is your point here?
What is your map supposed to show?

These are not points picked by chance on a map, but correspond to the major centers of Aztec civilization in the Valley of Mexico. Texcoco, Tlaltelolco, Tenochtitlan and Tenayuca were the largest cities in the Valley of Mexico at the time, possess striking architectural similarities, and were all built around the same time and by the same people. If you read carefully (which clearly you have not), you will see that the pattern of alignment is precisely centered around the major pyramids at each one of these sites.

The alignment Tenochtitlan-Tlatelolco-Tenayuca is so precise that it crosses exactly through the summit of each pyramid (a 0.0% error in alignment, as can be verified on Google Maps), and is moreover marked on the ground by one of the major Pre-Columbian highways in the Valley of Mexico - the present day Calzada Vallejo.

Also, one can easily verify that this allignment points toward a major landmark in the geography of Mexico, the Cerro de la Estrella, which is a prominent, isolated hill where the most important Aztec sacred ceremony was celebrated every 52 years (that is, the New Fire Ceremony). Again, not a casually picked location.

To my knowledge, almost no major landmark in the Aztec sacred geography of the Valley of Mexico falls outside of this system of alignments; but I would be happy if you could point me to the "hundreds of sites" that you think are missing from this scheme (By the way, if you think there were "hundreds" of major Aztec capitals and ceremonial centers in the Valley of Mexico, I highly recommend you check your sources).



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 01:35 PM
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a reply to: NeoIkonEpifanes
The Aztecs did in fact migrate from the north, but
I believe that that actually have their roots in central California, and here is my logic.
1) Aztec is part of a larger language family, it's in the Nahuan branch of Uto Aztecan, which encompasses the Utian languages of the great basin.
Mono, or Western Shoshone was spoken by the Mono whom lived in the higher Sierra Nevada above the salmon spawing beds of the rivers , where the southern miwok lived. Miwok physical culture can be definitely be placed in these areas for at least 8k years, that the oldest miwok find yet. Miwok legends say when they arrived here ,ie central Sierra, there was a remnant population that they in turn absorbed.
All of the native Californians of the central valley and mid Sierra ,in some combination, have a creation mythos that involves a flood , darkening of the Sun , the world set on fire, period of cold , starvation that leads to cannibalism in some cases, and among the band of miwok that lived between the Merced river and Tuolomne rivers have a particular story,, after being warned by Eagle that a great flood was coming, seven "chiefs" took their bands to find shelter in seven caves. (The Seven Caves of the Aztec)
I have had the honor of being shown the secret location (as long as I swore to never reveal is location) of one of the sacred caves, and it is here in central California.
Also all of the Native central Californians have a common " theft of fire" mythos, where a group, after long wanderings come to this new land but don't not have "proper" fire, but only a weak fire of no good use. The story usually involves the foothills people(Miwok) stealing fire from the pre existing valley people (Yokuts) flee back to the foothills, on the way , in order to deceive the pursuing valley people, the protagonist, usually Deer sometimes chipmunk, hides fire in the Cedar and Buckeye trees, where it can always be found. ( Cedar bark is used as tinder, Buckeye, which goes dormant in summer months produces a very dry hard wood from which fire drills are made.) Upon returning to the foothills the foothills people give fire to the mountain people(Mono), who are so cold ,that their teeth chatter and do not speak well.( Mono was semi intelligible by the southern Miwok)
The Yaqui of Mexico tell the same, albeit a much more simplified version, of the same "Theft of Fire"
story, the Yaqui language is Uto Aztecan.
2) The second bit of evidence for their comming from cal is agriculture. All of the prehistoric Mexican cultures have been practicing agriculture and make pottery.
Agriculture and pottery were never practices of Native Californians, north of the Tehachapi Mtns.
Yet the Yaqui have been pracring both quite some time, meaning they were dispersed after the language dispersal.


edit on p0000008k48812015Mon, 03 Aug 2015 13:48:39 -0500k by punkinworks10 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 02:36 PM
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a reply to: NeoIkonEpifanes
For a really good read on meso American astronomy I highly recommend this site


Meso American Astronomy



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 05:45 PM
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a reply to: punkinworks10

Thanks, Punkinworks. This is very interesting material.
Your story of an Aztec migration from Central California caught my attention. I understand you are obliged to silence concerning the location of this cave. Nevertheless, it would be interesting if you could provide some more details about its cultural context, or whether it is manmade or artificial.

Do you have any other sources for this Aztec creation stories?

Thanks in advance.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 07:31 PM
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originally posted by: NeoIkonEpifanes
a reply to: punkinworks10

Thanks, Punkinworks. This is very interesting material.
Your story of an Aztec migration from Central California caught my attention. I understand you are obliged to silence concerning the location of this cave. Nevertheless, it would be interesting if you could provide some more details about its cultural context, or whether it is manmade or artificial.

Do you have any other sources for this Aztec creation stories?

Thanks in advance.

You are welcome,
The cave is a natural cave high on a ridge between major river drainages.
The entrance is a deep vertical shaft, more than 100' deep and require climbing gear to get into.
I've only been to the edge of the entrance, but was told that there is a great deal of cultural material in there. The people have been making offerings at the cave for millennia and still do.
The evidence for a California origin for the uto Aztecan language family is somewhat nebulous, but it is the only way to reconcile the evidence across all the disciplines.
In comparative mythology the source story is the more complicated story, and the derived stories get simpler as time passes distance from the source increases. For the most part Californians never developed agriculture, even though the climate is perfect, there are no native plants suitable, other than the acorn, which was subject to intensive horticultural practices. The Californians also never developled pottery, which if both followed the languages, one would expect both to have taken
root if they spread with the languages.
The earliest example of Manos and Metates , grind stones, are found in California, the earliest accepted date for one is nearly 10k years old.

edit on p0000008k37812015Mon, 03 Aug 2015 19:37:19 -0500k by punkinworks10 because: (no reason given)



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