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Russian Mi-28N gunship crashes at airshow, all MI-28's grounded

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posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 10:33 AM
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a reply to: Xcalibur254

Most were only grounded a few days to a week and are flying again. Almost all of them the crew, or most of the crew survived.




posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 10:37 AM
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a reply to: Rocker2013

It's their ops tempo. Most of the aircraft involved haven't had major upgrades recently. The first half of 2015 interceptions of Russian aircraft were up 50% over all of 2013. Most of the accidents are engine related it appears.

The Russian military has always been known for maintenance issues, but when they were at their normal ops tempo it wasn't as big an issue. Now that they've ramped up operations as much as they have, it is.
edit on 8/2/2015 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 10:45 AM
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a reply to: pfishy

Interesting switch of the thread topic.



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 10:51 AM
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a reply to: Aliensun

Wasn't my intention. It's a valid association. Especially given that hydraulic issues were mentioned as a possible cause here as well.



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 10:57 AM
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a reply to: Sammamishman

Can we assume that the auto-gyro feature on that craft is a tad inefficient? Or did it go into auto-gyro at all? I can't tell from the blade direction ofrotations and there was an interruption in the video.



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 11:06 AM
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a reply to: Aliensun

Auto rotation you mean? You need some altitude for that, and if the hydraulics were out it would be difficult to control the blades from what I understand.



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 11:36 AM
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I see the tail rotor slow spinning. That matchers the claim of failed hydraulics, the statement by the co pilot said the hydraulics alarm sounded before loss of control, and we see the auto rotation descent…

A burst hydraulic line, that never happens.



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 11:56 AM
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You can clearly see the rear rotor has failed.. Is it a coincidence that it happened right after they all release chaff? Could that have been the cause as apposed to some type of internal failure? Just wondering...



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 12:04 PM
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a reply to: mark1167

If Russia's premier helicopter gunship is vulnerable to it's own chaff, does that mean the the old Doctor Who glitter gun was actually deadly?



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 02:11 PM
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Remarkable hte copilot walked out by himself from the burning wreckage. Imagine being in that 1000+ feet above ground and it starts spinning. And keeps doing it until it hits. That s*** isn't fake.

Amazing to me someone survives that. It's not just the vertical hit but the rotational momentum. They must wear "seat belts" for it? Given they're in an aircraft and crashing is going to be messy, seat belts are kind of meh, but I imagine they're useful when doing rapid maneuver and of course in this particular situation when the forces are survivable...

Just my thoughts. Glad someone survived. Not glad he got to see the pilot die and has to go through this though. But I know anybody trained for that knows this can happen. They must have some preparation.
edit on 2-8-2015 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 02:43 PM
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I don't think it was in auto rotation. The tail rotor failing for whatever reason would cause the aircraft to start spinning in the opposite direction of rotor torque and consequently cause the craft to lose lift due to loss of main rotor speed in relation to the fuselage. Meaning the power that was being used to spin rotor is now being absorbed by the opposite spin of the copter itself. I don't know what the tail rotor normally looks like but it looked like the two blades were not at right angles to each other possibly indicating some type of failure in the tail rotor shaft. Just my opinion.



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 02:46 PM
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a reply to: HarryJoy

I don't have nearly the experience with helicopters as fixed wing, but I would imagine if they lost hydraulics then they'd lose the ability to keep the rotors aligned like they should be.



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 03:02 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

In reading a little about this particular aircraft i did learn that it has an X style rear rotor that has the blades at a 55 deg angle in relation to each other as opposed to the traditional 90 deg relationship. But from what I have read the tail rotor is driven via a driveshaft directly off the main transmission....so I'm not sure how the hydraulic failure affected the tail rotor speed ? But it certainly would have caused loss of control functions. Anyway it was saddening to see the co-pilot watching the craft burn knowing his comrade was in it. Life certainly has it's hellish experiences.



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 03:09 PM
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originally posted by: Xcalibur254
With all the recent accidents what does Russia have left that isn't grounded?


Putin?
Putin's girlfriend?



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 05:41 PM
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a reply to: jonnywhite
Most combat aircraft have a survivability limit on its structure in case of a crash.From Pedia..



An emphasis was placed on survivability with a focus on redundancy, IR suppression and special shock absorbers for the crew to increase the maximum "safe" crash velocity.

Very strange for it to be a hydraulic failure if the helos systems are setup for redundancy.It must have been a primary system to go down in a big way..



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 05:50 PM
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a reply to: Blackfinger

It depends on the point of failure, even with redundancy. I've had jets come back leaking and barely notice it, or come back with one entire system drained and on emergency backups. Even had one come back with an engine on fire because the hydraulic pump let go and leaked onto the outside of the combustion chamber.

edit on 8/2/2015 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 05:55 AM
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a reply to: Sammamishman

Do you know how many choppers Russia has

So what if few crash

No biggie
edit on 3-8-2015 by Uma511 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 07:18 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Aliensun

Auto rotation you mean? You need some altitude for that, and if the hydraulics were out it would be difficult to control the blades from what I understand.


While true in my humble opinion and experience with several thousand hours helicopter time as a pilot.. The bird suffered a tail rotor failure.
Due to his lack of forward airspeed it really complicated getting the bird and crew down in one piece. If he would have had enough forward airspeed the aircraft would not have spun like it did and he could have reduced collective (power to the main rotor system) which would have reduced the torque of the rotor system to the airframe and entered a more crash worthy auto rotation.

Tail rotor failure with forward speed or at a hover (not in the dead man's zone) can be managed in many helicopters. I had one on a UH-1h model and we landed with no further damage to the bird.. But during my time we practiced simulated tail rotor failures in different environments.

On the other hand there are helicopters that almost become totally uncontrollable even in cruise flight during a complete tail rotor failure... A TH-13 had a violent pitch up with complete loss of tail rotor during a training flight around 1971/72? at Ft. Rucker, Alabama. The instructor and the student survived but I do not remember the damage to the bird.. I was amazed at how the bird reacted and how the instructor managed to get the bird down and they survive. To get the nose down on that bird (if I remember right) the instructor said he had about 1/2 inch of full forward cyclic control once he finally got control of the acrobatic wanting TH-13..

Our Russian helicopter was in the dead mans zone for auto rotation because of lack of forward speed.

Another helicopter that lost tail rotor without forward airspeed/


edit on 3-8-2015 by 727Sky because: ...



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 03:20 PM
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I agree that it was the T/R or something in the drive line for the T/R. I haven't had an actual T/R failure but practiced them frequently.
edit on 3-8-2015 by buddah6 because: lobotomized through superior pain meds.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 04:46 PM
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a reply to: DeadSeraph

i think the russian pilots flying these guys are almost like our blue angles but for helicopters so they are the best of the best and mostlikely why the craft did not land in amongst the spectators RIP to the pilot and speedy recovery to his co pilot



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