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Russian Mi-28N gunship crashes at airshow, all MI-28's grounded

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posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 09:09 AM
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A tragic accident occured when a Russian MI-28N Havac attack helicopter apparently suffered a mechanical failure during a aerobatic display at the Aviamix airshow S.E. of Moscow.

Unfortunately the pilot was killed on impact. The video shows the co-pilot was able to escape under his own power.

Until the cause of the accident can be determined the commander of the Russian air force has ordered all MI-28's grounded.



"According to preliminary report of the hospitalized pilot of Mi-28N, when performing an aerobatic stunt, the emergency alert system of the helicopter reported the failure of the hydraulic boost system,” the Defense Ministry’s press service said in a statement.




Russia's Air Force Commander-in-Chief Viktor Bondarev has ordered the grounding of all Mi-28 assault helicopters following the catastrophe in central Russia, the Defense Minister reported.




theaviationist.com...

www.rt.com...
edit on 2-8-2015 by Sammamishman because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 09:15 AM
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With all the recent accidents what does Russia have left that isn't grounded?



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 09:15 AM
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a reply to: Sammamishman

Glad to hear the co-pilot is ok. You can see just how skilled the crew is in the video given what they were dealing with and at that altitude when still able to put the bird into autorotation and live.

Sucks that one of them perished

edit on 2-8-2015 by DeadSeraph because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 09:16 AM
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a reply to: Sammamishman

I know the helicopter is some difference from the pilot but man that's a big helicopter....a beast



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 09:17 AM
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awful that the pilot got killed. condolences to his family.

hey samm, is uut just me or is a lot of Russian hardware catastrophically failing lately. from Russian state of the art tanks on parade to bombers to fighters now helicopters. I know Russia has a bad track record when it comes to maintenance and these sort of accidents, but it seems unusually high as of lately.

is it really that bad over there these days or is there more to it?



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 09:22 AM
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Dont fall for it they are saving gasoline!



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 09:37 AM
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a reply to: BASSPLYR

Yeah, they are having quite a few accidents all in a relatively short amount of time. It sounds like to me that they need some serious maintenance regime changes over there.
I'm also inclined to think that they may be aware of the issues their hardware is facing but are sort of turning a blind eye to them in order to keep up appearances to the rest of the world that they are ready to go at a moments notice. If they stop flying their equipment the way they have been the last couple years, it might be seen as a sign of weakness and that is something the Russian hierarchy isn't willing to accept.
They are running into the same issues we have with some of our older equipment but an a larger scale. They have old gear that is breaking down more often but can't afford to buy new gear to replace it fast enough.
I also don't think they have as stringent maintenance checklists as the West does.
When it comes to their state of the art hardware, I think they are too willing to show boat their ingenuity and technical prowess to the world before it is ready to be shown.
edit on 2-8-2015 by Sammamishman because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 09:43 AM
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Reminds me of the CH-47 Chinook crash many years ago at an airshow. Hydraulic issue as well, due to a fragment of the scouring agent used in maintenance getting trapped in a small line and disrupting the timing of the rotors. They hit each other and she went down like a stone.
The scouring agent was actually ground walnut shells, which were excellent at removing deposits in the engine and hydraulic systems, but not hard enough to damage to metal. Since that happened, they have switched to a purely chemical solvent method.



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 09:50 AM
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a reply to: chrismarco

It is a beast, close to the same size as an AH-64 Apache though.



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 09:52 AM
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a reply to: Sammamishman

agreed. i just think it sucks for the pilots over there. one due to the unreasonable risks they have to take to maintain a public perception.

but also, what a kick in the balls for these pilots. I'm sure, they like every other pilot out there, just want an opportunity to fly simply because they love flying. I'm sure it was these pilots life dream to fly just like any other pilot around the world and it sucks that these are their options.

it's like watching a video about some kid in a poor country that just wants an education and the only books he has the opportunity to read are mangled and missing pages. except in this case its engines bursting into flames and hydrolic failures. life's not fair I guess. but i wonder if American military pilots ever feel sorry for their Russian counterparts?
edit on 2-8-2015 by BASSPLYR because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 09:58 AM
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a reply to: BASSPLYR

I recall having seen video of cosmonauts weeping when they learned of the Colombia tragedy. I imagine it isn't too far fetched for an American pilot to feel concern or empathy for a foreign counterpart. Maybe not in the heat of battle, but on a human level I imagine it's probably common.



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 10:00 AM
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a reply to: pfishy

not much to say in response other than i agree totally. gave you a star.



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 10:05 AM
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a reply to: BASSPLYR

I feel for the pilot, and I'm certainly not his peer. And performance aviation is especially difficult. Just because a helicopter CAN perform certain maneuvers doesn't mean that it really ever SHOULD. The speedometer in my car tops out at 160mph. I've never attempted to figure out if it is lying to me or not.



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 10:11 AM
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a reply to: pfishy

good point. just cause something can do it doesn't mean it can do it safely.

look at a classic muscle car. can easily push its self up to 150 mph. but what happens at about 115? the car wasn't designed to cruise at speeds like that. it's front end is too long and generating front end lift like a wing. weight gets taken off the front tires and the car starts to glide and drift around from lane to lane making it hard to control, unsafe and liable to lose it at any second if youre not care full or if an unforseen contingency shows up.



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 10:12 AM
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To be honest, if I was in the Russian military I would not press any buttons.

Here's another failure - only a few days ago...

Navy Day Parade in Sevastopol, makes you proud to be protected by the Russian navy!


edit on 2/8/2015 by paraphi because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 10:12 AM
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a reply to: BASSPLYR

Just like my old Lincoln...



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 10:13 AM
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The Russian Defense Ministry will procure up to 60 Mi-28UB training versions by 2020. The version will speed up and improve pilot training.


I think their recent failures are probably mostly due to a combination of upgrades and a lack of adequate training for those upgrades.

Russia has been working on quickly upgrading various aspects of their military and this is bound to cause problems. Because they haven't done this consistently and gradually over a period of decades (like many other countries have) they now have a situation where training is out of step with the technology they're using.

In the most basic terms it's the equivalent of having your Rotary desk phone replaced with an iPhone 5 and be expected to just deal with it. That's going to affect everything from training to maintenance.



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 10:16 AM
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a reply to: Rocker2013

You make an excellent point.



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 10:17 AM
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originally posted by: BASSPLYR
is it really that bad over there these days or is there more to it?


It might also just be down to mathematics. Has the Russian military been this active at all in the last few decades?

Seems to me they haven't been. Most of this equipment has probably been mothballed for years, occasionally taken out for a bit of upkeep, then put away again. But right now they're putting on a flexing display, which means more hours in flight, more men involved, more opportunities for accidents to happen.



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 10:27 AM
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a reply to: Rocker2013

They have been doing extensive work to upgrade the fleet. This is likely an upgraded version, not the M, but still has performance upgrades. I'm not sure it would have been recently recomissioned.




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