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Hydration lacking danger story.

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posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 01:20 AM
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There is a mountain near where I live called Grouse Mountain, and there is a long trail that goes up in a continual manner to the top with step after step. It is rated as a very difficult hike, and having just done it, I agree with it's ranking. It's a VERY tough climb.

Now, I am a fairly fit 65 year old, but I made a big mistake. I didn't respect the mountain. And I didn't understand the importance of water in the body when you need to do difficult things. Water makes blood which carries oxygen which is fuel for the body.

I didn't hydrate on the day before the climb, and I didn't hydrate in the morning of the climb. And so I suffered big time. Racing heart, weakness that made any movement really hard, and a feeling I wanted to faint that persisted after the Grind, even as I drove down the mountain in my car, dangerous stuff.

At the restaurant, I drank 3 glasses of water and never felt a need to visit the washroom.

If you want to take on difficult physical things, get a lot of water in your body.




posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 02:47 AM
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Agree on the need to hydrate when doing long hikes.

I have sterilising tabs in my pack at all times in case I run out of water and when I know I cannot carry enough e.g. wild camping. Mostly though, the places I walk are pristine so don't bother with sterilisation. Luckily, I live in a country where water is not a problem!

I once, at a whim, climbed Tryfan (Wales) on a very hot day and suffered for lack of preparation.



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 03:15 AM
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a reply to: droid56

i forgot to hydrate once, and i lost vision in my right eye, came back after 20 minutes when i drank a gallon of water.



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 03:25 AM
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Dehydration causes you to make bad decisions. Bad decision number one for you was not turning back when you felt faint. That could very easily been the end of you.



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 04:04 AM
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a reply to: droid56

"Camelbak"

I take mine even when I go jogging.

Admittedly,I jog for 13 miles or so.

High altitudes will dry you out much faster,too.



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 07:23 AM
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a reply to: droid56

Thank for that advice



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 07:35 AM
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Most people are chronically dehydrated, which makes for symptoms of illness, illness, "disease", and all sorts of trouble and tribulation. Some of the keys to life (found by monks and monkeys alike) are hydration, megadoses of 'vitamin C', exercise, and, for the really healthy monks and monkeys, veganism.

I once climbed a large hill/small mountain without hydrating, my lips cracked in an instant from dehydration not far from the summit, which I then climbed and actually ran down, where I 'cured' my instant dehydration by eating a large cucumber. Good times.



posted on Aug, 2 2015 @ 05:31 PM
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Thanks for that post. Perhaps it will help others to remember.
Another tip that I've never seen in "official" literature about dehydration/heat exhaustion is that one of the earliest symptoms is a runny nose. Yeah, sounds crazy but I've observed it for years while directing field crews in summer heat/humidity. It comes just before you stop sweating so if you are in the heat and your nose suddenly begins to drip, get to the shade and begin hydrating by mouth and if possible, pour water over your head as well.
I have no idea why the nose begins to run but over 20 years of watching people ignore the advice to keep well-watered, I know it happens consistently.



posted on Aug, 10 2015 @ 08:23 PM
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originally posted by: droid56
There is a mountain near where I live called Grouse Mountain, and there is a long trail that goes up in a continual manner to the top with step after step. It is rated as a very difficult hike, and having just done it, I agree with it's ranking. It's a VERY tough climb.

Now, I am a fairly fit 65 year old, but I made a big mistake. I didn't respect the mountain. And I didn't understand the importance of water in the body when you need to do difficult things. Water makes blood which carries oxygen which is fuel for the body.

I didn't hydrate on the day before the climb, and I didn't hydrate in the morning of the climb. And so I suffered big time. Racing heart, weakness that made any movement really hard, and a feeling I wanted to faint that persisted after the Grind, even as I drove down the mountain in my car, dangerous stuff.

At the restaurant, I drank 3 glasses of water and never felt a need to visit the washroom.

If you want to take on difficult physical things, get a lot of water in your body.


---

Don't try the Grouse Grind without at least THREE BOTTLES of Gatorade!

It's almost Three Thousand feet STRAIGHT UP and even I take quite
over an hour and a half to do that climb!

GATORADE really does work in this situation!

for ever thousand feet of climb it's one bottle of Gatorade
In the case of the Grouse Grind which is a PUNISHING nearly
straight up climb in North Vancouver, BC, Canada up a REALLY
STEEP mountain side it's sugar energy loss not just hydration
that kills ya. You need BOTH salt and sugar to keep yourself
alive on that climb!



posted on Aug, 21 2015 @ 12:37 AM
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I'm doing it again on this coming Tuesday. I have been working out, I will hydrate like crazy, and I will load up on carbs.

But I am just about to turn 66. The climb is a fierce challenge.

After I do it, I will submit a report.



posted on Aug, 21 2015 @ 02:40 AM
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a reply to: droid56

Carb loading isn't a good idea,in my experience.A hearty breakfast that's reasonably low on fat may be a better idea.

Please don't take or eat PowerBars or similar unless you eat them often,I've had a bad experience with them when I was on a cross-country mountainbike race.

66 years old?Good work,bloke.Take it easy.




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