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Anybody here knowledgeable with audio editing/production?

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posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 06:33 PM
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If anybody on here is knowledgeable with audio editing/production I'd greatly appreciate it if you could answer a quick question.

I've posted a video below as an example. At 0:05, what effect is used on his voice? I do some (amateur) audio editing in my spare time but I've always wondered what effects/processes are involved in that vocal effect. It's also commonly used by radio DJs. I don't expect anybody to explain the entire process to me, but just a link to a YouTube video or a text tutorial would be great. Thanks in advance





posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 06:38 PM
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a reply to: Xaphan

Just a slight decrease in playback speed.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 06:39 PM
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a reply to: greencmp
I can tell the speed and pitch have been shifted. There's something else there though. I can't quite put my finger on it.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 06:40 PM
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a reply to: Xaphan

Sounds like they decreased the speed of the playback, as well as did a pitch adjustment downwards.

If you use a program liek Audacity, you can do that through the "Change Pitch" effect.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 06:41 PM
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a reply to: Xaphan

I think, as well, they left the original track in place, are playing it at a very low volume, and then the deeper track overlaid on it.

Also, sounds like a couple others were shifted to pitches between the original and the new bass one.

Make sense?



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 06:42 PM
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a reply to: Xaphan

It's obviously had some parallel compression added. Basically sending the vocals to a separate track, compressing the crap out of it, like 10:1 and then sending it back to another channel and volumes are brought up underneath the main vocal channel.

Compressing makes things that are quite louder, and since lower tones (bass tones) are quieter compressing helps to bring in some "beef" as I like to call it, lol.

You can google parallel compression, it's mainly used on drums but there are a few good vocal tutorials out there.

Cheers.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 06:44 PM
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a reply to: Xaphan

Highly compressed source material and probably normalized in the sampler.

If you are referring to its "place in the mix", all of the very lows have been cut, probably with a parametric EQ or a filter.

Start with 96KHZ or better sample to reduce graininess.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 06:45 PM
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a reply to: Xaphan

Hi. It is achieved by lowering the pitch of the voice. That clip and the voices you hear on the radio jingles have been edited by software. There are hardware effects that can change pitch in real time, but that clip was not done that way. The audio was edited and the pitch changed.

It depends on what software you use to record. Cubase, Pro Tools, all are slightly different and the tutorials would be also.

There are many tricks. Editing wise, you could track a single voice say three times, glue it together with say a compression technique, having lowered the pitch with a little reverb and the voice would sound very deep and big.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 06:48 PM
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a reply to: Jomina
I know what you mean. Kind of like a time shift effect. The tracks all overlapping but some shifted forwards and backwards slightly to give it a bigger 'thundery' sound. One of the tracks probably equalized to bring out all the bottom. I was thinking something along those lines but wasn't completely sure. Thanks for the input



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 07:10 PM
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And a big thanks to the last three who replied. I can do a little more research now that I have some detailed info.

Cheers



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 08:19 PM
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I'm in the car right now so taking the time to listen isn't possible at the moment. I did however go to school for live show production which also included all the classes for recording engineering. I will take a listen and let you know what I think as soon as I can. These are fun exercises to me anyway.

Also just quickly about compression in general... It does not make anything louder unless you turn up the output gain. What compression does is reduce the dynamic range in the signal. Basically the louder stuff has gain reduction while being able to up the output gain to make those quieter parts a little louder. Don't even get me going on parallel compression lol. You would be the perfect person to tell about one of the best resources for learning this stuff outside of an actual school specializing in it. There is a site called Lynda.org that offers courses on all of the aspects of entertainment I could think of. Basically you pay the subscription fee and get access to all the courses for like everything. Well worth a look!



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 08:26 PM
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Wow, you guys are really over-complicating things.

It's called *pitch shifting*... it's just a lower octave effect.
You can find this effect on most digital audio computer software like Adobe Audition, Logic, ProTools etc...
Or, you can find this feature in simple outboard stompboxes like this one...

He uses the effect at 2:58... in the video, he's got the Balance at about 50/50 = 50% dry signal & 50% wet (all effect).

edit on 7/29/2015 by the_philth because: (no reason given)

edit on 7/29/2015 by the_philth because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 11:22 PM
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Yes basically its a pitch shift or time stretch (basically a delay) very commonly used in software like audacity or like 50 others...lol. There are a few ways to make things sound like this however the simplest is probably what it is...a simple pitch shift and a mix of the wet and dry signal like the_philth said.



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