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So you want to know how Abiogenesis works? [VIDEO]

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posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 01:08 AM
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Well, maybe you don't, but here's some useful information anyways!



There's a lot of confusion about Abiogenesis, both from the Religious, and the non religious, not to mention those who accept Evolution as a valid theory of how life evolves on Earth, and those who reject it.

Abiogenesis is the process by which a living organism arises naturally from non-living matter. The following video depicts how that may be possible, and counters many common arguments against the subject often used by Creationists.

This topic isn't necessarily about if Abiogenesis is right or wrong, nor is it about if Creation is right or wrong. It's simply here to address those who may be confused or ill informed about how our commonly accepted models within Abiogenesis really say about the subject.

These Youtuber has many videos in regards to the Origin of Life, I highly suggest you review those as well, as they are very informative.

Exerpt from the video's description


It's been [over 60] years since the Miller-Urey Experiment, and science has made enormous progress on solving the origin of life. This video summarizes one of the best leading models. Yes there are others. Science may never know exactly how life DID start, but we will know many ways how life COULD start. Don't be fooled by creationist arguments as even a minimal understanding of biology and chemistry is enough to realize they have no clue what they are talking about.

Note on how competition works. Water will flow across a membrane to try to equalize the ion concentration. If there is a lot of polymer in a vesicle it will be surrounded by many ions, thus causing water to flow into the vesicle, increasing the internal pressure and stretching the membrane. Fatty acids are in equilibrium between the vesicle and solution. If 2 vesicles are near one another they will gradually swap fatty acids. If one membrane is under tension, the fatty acid "on rate" will be greater than the "off rate" (move to a lower energy state by relaxing the pressure). It will suck up fatty acids from solution. The other vesicle will still give them off, but they will disappear (sucked up by neighbor) and not return. Therefore, the vesicle with high internal pressure will grow and the neighbor will shrink.


edit on 29/7/15 by Ghost147 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 03:13 AM
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My new most dearest argument against Creationism is this:

"The laws governing what constitutes a good explanation don’t talk about plausible excuses you hear afterward.
They talk about the probabilities we assign in advance. That’s why science makes people do advance predictions, instead of trusting explanations people come up with afterward."

And Creationism can't do any predictions. Therefore, Creationism != Science.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 03:55 AM
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a reply to: Ghost147

Does Dr Szostack have a model that explains why the increased osmotic pressure would not simply tear the lipid 'protocells' apart before any significant internal polymerization (let alone natural selection) can occur?



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 04:54 AM
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a reply to: chr0naut

Why not just ask Dr. Szostak himself? szostak@molbio.mgh.harvard.edu



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 06:16 AM
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originally posted by: peter vlar
a reply to: chr0naut

Why not just ask Dr. Szostak himself? szostak@molbio.mgh.harvard.edu


Yes, and by all means post up the correspondence.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 11:30 AM
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a reply to: peter vlar

Yes, please follow up with this, Chronaut, I'm interested in his response.

Thanks.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 02:03 PM
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originally posted by: peter vlar
a reply to: chr0naut

Why not just ask Dr. Szostak himself? szostak@molbio.mgh.harvard.edu


I have sent him an e-mail.

Thank you for the address.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 03:31 PM
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a reply to: Barcs peter vlar and GetHyped

Just received a reply back (that was fast!) as follows:

----------------------

Actually lipid membranes are pretty tough, and vesicles can withstand a fair bit of internal osmotic pressure before they rupture,

Best,

Jack


> On Jul 29, 2015, at 2:01 PM, XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX wrote:
>
> Dr Szostak,
>
> I recently came across a video about abiogenesis and mentioning your research.
>
> I was wondering about the stage where the internal osmotic pressure increases. Would this not break apart the protocell structure if they were simply an encapsulation by lipids?
>
> Have I misunderstood or are there additional steps not addressed in the video?
>
> I will understand if you are too busy to respond. It is just a question that occurred to me while watching the video.
>
> Thank you,



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 11:28 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut

Sounds like an understanding, reasonable guy. Thanks for emailing him!



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 11:54 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut

well done and damn... that certainly was a quick turnaround on the response!



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