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Intel and Micron Produce Breakthrough Memory Technology

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posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 03:45 AM
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a reply to: Aleister

Programs need short term memory (typically called RAM) to hold bits of program that is fed into the computers brain (the cpu). If they can make short term memory cheaper and faster it offers an improvement in speed. The resulting improvement might not be realized if other bottlenecks (CPU etc) cannot accept the data from memory fast enough.




posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 04:24 AM
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a reply to: EA006

Can you imagine what this will do for SSD

Nice



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 04:47 AM
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originally posted by: justQ
a reply to: EA006

Can you imagine what this will do for SSD

Nice


IDK from the website it seems as though they are billing it more for as a high capacity replacement SRAM. The applications they list from their website are currently using GPU's by in large to accomplish those tasks. I would lean more towards the effort being to replace SSD or replace current storage hardware.

-FBB
edit on 29-7-2015 by FriedBabelBroccoli because: 101



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 06:22 AM
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I wonder what the number of write cycles is.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 07:02 AM
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I predict in the near future, English language it will become all NNS, SSA, BBM, CCT, KKF, PPL, TTR, AEG, JIY etc. Total bull #it and non sense. Lazy people always choose to shorten things. It doesn't make anyone seam smarter. Just moronic and disconnected from reality. Being understood from everyone is an ability. Acting superior by using acronyms is lame. Use shorten terms in a convention of nerds. In a public forum make yourself clear so everyone can understand what you're saying.
edit on 29-7-2015 by Telos because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 07:06 AM
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Current DDR3 and DDR4 memory isn't a bottleneck, so, the average home PC user wouldn't see much of a performance increase over their current RAM. It would shine in synthetic benchmarks and memory-intensive applications, though.
edit on 29-7-2015 by Kromlech because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 07:29 AM
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a reply to: Telos

This is a remarkably ignorant comment to make. If you really think that people shorten terms like "synchronous dynamic random access memory" to acronyms like SDRAM in conversation in order to look "superior" then you are not a smart person.

edit: even in the post above, saying "double data rate type three synchronous dynamic random-access memory" instead of DDR3 is staggeringly pointless and silly but doesn't exactly shed anymore light on the term for the layperson. Your logic is bad.
edit on 29-7-2015 by GetHyped because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 07:57 AM
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originally posted by: GetHyped
a reply to: Telos

This is a remarkably ignorant comment to make. If you really think that people shorten terms like "synchronous dynamic random access memory" to acronyms like SDRAM in conversation in order to look "superior" then you are not a smart person.

edit: even in the post above, saying "double data rate type three synchronous dynamic random-access memory" instead of DDR3 is staggeringly pointless and silly but doesn't exactly shed anymore light on the term for the layperson. Your logic is bad.


Take it easy ignoramus. I can make my self understood to others when I talk. The point is not about SDRAM or DD3. But in general with the tendency of using acronyms. And by the way, I don't give a rat's @ss what you think about me. But just the fact that you didn't get at all what I said makes me smile when I get a "you're not a smart person" comment from you.

p.s. I'm in the IT field myself.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 08:12 AM
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a reply to: Telos

Your argument is still nonsensical, particularly for someone who claims they work in IT. And yes, if you actually believe that people use acronyms in technology to look "superior" and that using the incredibly verbose and inefficient full names would be better and easier to understand, you are not a smart person. That was what you said in your rant, after all.
edit on 29-7-2015 by GetHyped because: (no reason given)


(post by Telos removed for a manners violation)

posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 08:43 AM
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a reply to: EA006

This is pretty exciting, but there are of course limitations.

As I understand it this about delivering core files at greater speed, and not processing data on a continual basis.

So, while it won't make your gaming experience massively different in speed and possibilities, it will allow your gaming system to load up larger files without delay. So, you could have a level of game play 1,000 times larger with instant loading of that game, rather than have each aspect of it slowly delivered and that level limited by capacity.

I think that's the best explanation I have seen - basically plagiarized lol

The real breakthrough will come with power.

At the moment there are numerous new companies working on some excellent new battery technology, and that's really what we need. That will absolutely become a game changer in the technology world and it will have an impact on everything from renewable energy production an storage to transport to gaming to communications...

If we can shrink down batteries and make them fare more efficient and increase their capacity (as some are seemingly working on doing, with valid results so far) then we could see a massive leap forward.
edit on 29-7-2015 by Rocker2013 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 09:28 AM
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**ATTENTION**

Enough.

Go after the ball, no the player.

Any further T&C infractions will result in posting bans.

~Tenth
ATS Super Mod



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 11:34 AM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

Can you imagine putting a quad core of these things together?






posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 12:00 PM
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originally posted by: MystikMushroom
I bet it's alien technology...

LOL


In all seriousness, where are the holographic hard drives we heard about years ago?


Cloaked.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 12:02 PM
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a reply to: greencmp

They'd be great for archival purposes since they last a reported 50 years compared to tape, CD and DVD shelf lives...

I hate microfilm, let us have our holographic drives!



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 12:03 PM
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originally posted by: GetHyped
a reply to: Telos

This is a remarkably ignorant comment to make. If you really think that people shorten terms like "synchronous dynamic random access memory" to acronyms like SDRAM in conversation in order to look "superior" then you are not a smart person.

edit: even in the post above, saying "double data rate type three synchronous dynamic random-access memory" instead of DDR3 is staggeringly pointless and silly but doesn't exactly shed anymore light on the term for the layperson. Your logic is bad.


PCMCIA = People Can't Memorize Computer Industry Acronyms



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 12:05 PM
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originally posted by: MystikMushroom
a reply to: greencmp

They'd be great for archival purposes since they last a reported 50 years compared to tape, CD and DVD shelf lives...

I hate microfilm, let us have our holographic drives!


Yeah, I'm ready for crystals myself. Maybe a home NMRI will be available before this mortal coil unravels.



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 02:27 PM
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So the new memory is 10 times denser than current which is pretty cool. The below article talks about early adoption of Optane in Macbooks due to currently used standards.


(Reporter, Agam) Shah reported that "Intel's been quiet about its super-fast Optane memory and SSD products, but a few emerging details may hint at how they could be used in products like Apple's MacBooks."

Ben Lovejoy in 9to5Mac pointed out that "Apple's PCIe SSDs are already very fast, in part due to the Non-Volatile Memory Express (NVMe) protocol used in the latest MacBooks."

Why are all eyes on Apple among the laptop vendors? Shah said that "Apple is among the first vendors to implement the latest laptop technologies and may jump at the chance at putting Optane in its MacBooks."
...
According to Shah, the first Optane products will likely be SSDs and reach enthusiasts' PCs next year, then spreading to other desktops and mobile products. Also coming are Optane memory DIMMs, which can be plugged into existing memory slots.

Source: TechXplore: Might Intel Optane memory tech come to MacBooks?

The DIMMs (dual in-line memory module -- RAM) would be great for those of us with limited slots (--like a Mac Mini) even if it is a modest increase in storage speed/throughput would be welcome.

Wonder how much of an increase in price this will be??




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