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Dunkin' CEO: $15 minimum wage is 'outrageous'

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posted on Jul, 26 2015 @ 04:49 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

you probably have no idea what the ceo's job entailed.
the ceo of my spot does not make millions but he does damn good.
there is a huge amount of responsibility with that job.
far more than just doing nothing.

you can bet the ceo of dunkin can do the jobs of the people on the floor but they couldnt do his.



paying burger flippers 15 bucks an hour, especially first job teens is a major slap in the face to people that have busted ass and worked their way up through the ranks for better positions and money.

these days people feel so damn entitled.
we deserve this. we deserve that. why?

a hash slinger should make nowhere close to the same amount of money as people in the trades and manufacturing.
im not talking people that stand on a line in one spot all day and pack # in a box.

im talking machinists and such.

either way though. if this big hike happens then other jobs will follow suit and the flippers will still be on the bottom end of the pay scale.....right where they should be




posted on Jul, 26 2015 @ 08:22 PM
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Well, hate to bust your bubble but there Are burger flippers who make 15 an hour. They have them in australia, in germany, and toronto, washington, and other places I'm Sure. Good to know that a gas pumper is valued more highly in the UK and Canada than in the US. More appropriately, they just value their poor more, and see their worth as people rather than leeches and undermench.



posted on Jul, 26 2015 @ 08:24 PM
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a reply to: pexx421

How dare you.



posted on Jul, 26 2015 @ 09:10 PM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
Talk about lack of logic....as you point out, you make minimum wage $15/hr, all you end up doing is making $15 = $7.25

Talk about pissing on someone and telling them its raining


Not necessarily. Australia's minimum wage is $15/hour USD, and they have a very comparable economy. The biggest difference is that things like restaurants and groceries are about 10% more expensive.



posted on Jul, 26 2015 @ 10:43 PM
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originally posted by: onequestion

People have god complexes.


Some people do..other people make up the opposite end of the spectrum..it takes both sides to make the world go round..



posted on Jul, 26 2015 @ 11:04 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

the Australian economy is just a tad bit smaller than the Texas economy. Its not really a same/same comparison. Matter of fact, the entire nation of Australia equates to New York City in value.



posted on Jul, 26 2015 @ 11:14 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

So Australia's model is not scalable?

They are running an economy that cannot grow.

That sucks.



posted on Jul, 26 2015 @ 11:26 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

No, they are running an economy that is wholly divergent from ours.

I really don't mean this in a negative way....but the US economy is so large that we are the table. everyone else gets the scraps. In much of the world, the phrase "We have American investors" equates to "our ship has finally come in".

No, Australias economy is nothing like the US economy. Its a result of US "Soft Imperialism". Where we only seek to control the banks of every country, and not the government.



posted on Jul, 26 2015 @ 11:27 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

So if these countries are only getting our scraps how is it that they have less inequality and higher standards of living?



posted on Jul, 26 2015 @ 11:31 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

Because their government manages their economy better than ours.

You don't think China is doing so well because Chairman Mao had this swell plan, do you? No, them and India are siphoning off value from the US. China does it via cheap labor, India does it via the EB-5 program and cash exports.



posted on Jul, 26 2015 @ 11:32 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

I should add: if the US economy stops growing, every single other economy int he world stops growing.

When Wall St. sneezes, the rest of the world is dying from the flu.



posted on Jul, 27 2015 @ 12:29 AM
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originally posted by: muse7
I'm sorry but $15 bucks an hour for fast food workers IS outrageous.

The CEO might be overpaid but he probably went to university and busted his ass at school to at least deserve some of the money he's making.

If these people want to make $15 an hour then they should go to college and get a degree in something useful that's in demand or learn a trade that's in demand.

I actually agree with you on a few points. However, part of the problem is that there is a rising cost of living we just cannot keep up with and a shortage of really good jobs. The manufacturing and tech sector has taken a big beating in recent years, but as far back as the 80's I remember the steel industry suffering under increasing competition from foreign corporations. Competition can be a healthy thing, but it is unfortunate that the real problem is the reason for the decline in our manufacturing base here and the excessive printing of money out of thin air which creates a hidden inflation.



posted on Jul, 27 2015 @ 12:46 AM
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a reply to: ThirdEyeofHorus

The reason those factories left the country is because the poorest person in town didn't take personal responsability from the homeless shelter and get an angel investor and start a new one. Without the union they could have hired everyone at slave wages ( minumum wage). Oh I consider anything that someone does full time that doesn't pay them enough to live on a slave wage. How the f*** are you suppose to survive te job if it doesn't pay you enough to live on?

Anyway... That homeless should have gone to college for 4-10 years and made the right connections to find the investor to open a new business in that town.

God what idiots those people were who lost their entire cities economy to factories shutting down and going over seas to increase profit margins for the ultra wealthy.

That idiot in the homeless shelter didn't take enough responsability.



posted on Jul, 27 2015 @ 01:42 AM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
a reply to: Aazadan

the Australian economy is just a tad bit smaller than the Texas economy. Its not really a same/same comparison. Matter of fact, the entire nation of Australia equates to New York City in value.


No offense but I think this is circular reasoning. If we use the argument that what happens in other economies isn't comparable to what happens here, then there's also no other countries to base saying an increase of the minimum wage will slow the economy. In fact, what we end up with in such a situation is comparing only to ourselves and seeing that most people were better off in the 1950's and 1960's when the minimum wage had much higher purchasing power than it does today.

That said, I can certainly agree that a one size fits all wage in the US doesn't work because there's too much of a difference in the cost of living from one state to the next, but the same is true if we were to make it a states rights issue as well. Where I live in Ohio for example our $7.85/hr minimum wage is actually quite a good wage in my town but it's woefully inadequate in the cities and that's a perfect example of how the wealth gap plays out on a macro scale creating areas of vastly different costs of living.



posted on Jul, 27 2015 @ 07:13 AM
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If the fast food guys/gals are making $15 an hour now, are the ones making $15 an hour now going to get an upgrade in pay? I know a few people in supervisor positions that work in metal shops and other blue collar trade skills that only make $15 an hour.

If the cost of living stayed the same I guess it wouldn't be a problem. But I don't see that happening, it'll just go up to match the new wage and the people that worked their way up to $15 an hour will just be lumped in to the new $15 an hour people.



posted on Jul, 27 2015 @ 07:25 AM
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originally posted by: muse7
I'm sorry but $15 bucks an hour for fast food workers IS outrageous.

The CEO might be overpaid but he probably went to university and busted his ass at school to at least deserve some of the money he's making.

If these people want to make $15 an hour then they should go to college and get a degree in something useful that's in demand or learn a trade that's in demand.


Labor is a commodity, like any other. It is, ultimately, worth what the market will bear.


Higher wages is a way to get and keep skilled labor that may go to your competition. When I was a kid, I worked at McDonalds for about a year and I was well over minimum wage rapidly because, as my manager said "I was the only person he could depend on to show up on time and as scheduled."

Minimum wage jobs, however, are usually not those that take a large amount of training and often have high turnover.



posted on Jul, 27 2015 @ 07:29 AM
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originally posted by: Aazadan

originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
a reply to: Aazadan

the Australian economy is just a tad bit smaller than the Texas economy. Its not really a same/same comparison. Matter of fact, the entire nation of Australia equates to New York City in value.


No offense but I think this is circular reasoning. If we use the argument that what happens in other economies isn't comparable to what happens here, then there's also no other countries to base saying an increase of the minimum wage will slow the economy. In fact, what we end up with in such a situation is comparing only to ourselves and seeing that most people were better off in the 1950's and 1960's when the minimum wage had much higher purchasing power than it does today.

That said, I can certainly agree that a one size fits all wage in the US doesn't work because there's too much of a difference in the cost of living from one state to the next, but the same is true if we were to make it a states rights issue as well. Where I live in Ohio for example our $7.85/hr minimum wage is actually quite a good wage in my town but it's woefully inadequate in the cities and that's a perfect example of how the wealth gap plays out on a macro scale creating areas of vastly different costs of living.


In the 50's and 60's we had a middle class.

Minimum wage laws, along with our ridiculous trade policies, killed the middle class.

RE: other nations...no circiular reasoning. I base all my observations off of what happens and has happened in the US. It was someone else bringing up Australia....i was just tryinng to show how the US economy is unique in the world. It is the wood that the global engines burn, to so speak.

ETA: your last paragraph regarding disparities in economies from urban to rural environment....100% spot on.
edit on 7/27/2015 by bigfatfurrytexan because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 27 2015 @ 07:33 AM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan

originally posted by: Aazadan

originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
a reply to: Aazadan

the Australian economy is just a tad bit smaller than the Texas economy. Its not really a same/same comparison. Matter of fact, the entire nation of Australia equates to New York City in value.


No offense but I think this is circular reasoning. If we use the argument that what happens in other economies isn't comparable to what happens here, then there's also no other countries to base saying an increase of the minimum wage will slow the economy. In fact, what we end up with in such a situation is comparing only to ourselves and seeing that most people were better off in the 1950's and 1960's when the minimum wage had much higher purchasing power than it does today.

That said, I can certainly agree that a one size fits all wage in the US doesn't work because there's too much of a difference in the cost of living from one state to the next, but the same is true if we were to make it a states rights issue as well. Where I live in Ohio for example our $7.85/hr minimum wage is actually quite a good wage in my town but it's woefully inadequate in the cities and that's a perfect example of how the wealth gap plays out on a macro scale creating areas of vastly different costs of living.


In the 50's and 60's we had a middle class.

Minimum wage laws, along with our ridiculous trade policies, killed the middle class.

RE: other nations...no circiular reasoning. I base all my observations off of what happens and has happened in the US. It was someone else bringing up Australia....i was just tryinng to show how the US economy is unique in the world. It is the wood that the global engines burn, to so speak.

ETA: your last paragraph regarding disparities in economies from urban to rural environment....100% spot on.


I grew up in Michigan where the big three held court. Back in the day, all a kid would have to do do have a solid middle class life was to squeak through high school and then get the same union job on the line that his dad did and that's all a lot of kids aspired to back then. No more. Those days are over.



posted on Jul, 27 2015 @ 07:36 AM
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a reply to: ugmold

The problem is that a $15 minimum wage doesn't address the problem. Now we have it in Seattle and employees are asking for fewer hours so that they can still make less and get government assistance instead of using their increased income to pull themselves up. The issue is much deeper than just increasing minimum wage.

www.breitbart.com...



posted on Jul, 27 2015 @ 07:39 AM
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originally posted by: joeandandi
a reply to: ugmold

The problem is that a $15 minimum wage doesn't address the problem. Now we have it in Seattle and employees are asking for fewer hours so that they can still make less and get government assistance instead of using their increased income to pull themselves up. The issue is much deeper than just increasing minimum wage.

www.breitbart.com...



Law of unintended consequences. These issues are a lot more complex that simply raising a wage. The expense to the employer is not just the wage of the employee--for every dollar an employee is increased, the employer has to pay out additional money in SS contributions and so forth.



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