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Has Nasa found another 'Earth' in corner of Milky Way?

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posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 11:28 AM
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NASA Live announcement of KOI catalogue 7 showing vast increase in new detections, basically that the new system development means the Kepler mission potential 'Earths' can be revisited in their assessment whereas before they couldn't.

The project is also continuing and should be more thorough in its research due to the new development.

Perhaps someday Kepler will find a planet similar in composition to Earth, at the moment the most likely candidate found by Kepler according to NASA is Kepler 452b.

So far there are 8 small habitable zone exoplanets from 1024 confirmed exoplanets.

www.physics-astronomy.com...

www.telegraph.co.uk...


Last April astronomers found the most Earth-like planet so far orbiting a distant sun in our galaxy.
The planet – named Kepler-186f – is 500 light years away and orbits a red dwarf star in the constellation Cygnus in our corner of the Milky Way.

Kepler-186f is orbiting at the outer edge of the habitable zone around its star, which could mean that any liquid surface water would be in danger of freezing.

However because it slightly larger than Earth scientists are hoping the atmosphere would be thick enough to provide a blanket of insulation.

So far more than 3,800 possible planets have been detected by Kepler but this is the first that is so much like Earth.
However it would be impossible to visit the planet to find out if it contained life. Not only is it 2,939 trillion miles away, the light we are seeing is 500 years old.




Kepler-452b is smallest planet to date discovered orbiting in the habitable zone of a G2-type star, like our own

The planet is 60 per cent larger in diameter than Earth and is 1,400 light years away in the constellation Cygnus

It has the a similar size orbit to Earth, receives the same amount of sun light and has the same length of year

Scientists are not yet sure whether it hosts life, but say if plants were transferred there, they are likely to survive

Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk...




Astronomers have found a planet they say is 'the closest twin to Earth' ever seen.

Named Kepler-452b, it is the smallest planet discovered orbiting in the habitable zone of a star, and has been described as an 'older, bigger cousin'.

What makes this planet remarkable is that it orbits its star at about the same distance that Earth orbits the sun. What's more, its home star looks to be similar to our sun.

This Earth-like world has a 'substantial opportunity' to host life, Nasa says, adding that if plants were transferred there, they would likely survive.

This artist's concept depicts one possible appearance of the planet Kepler-452b, the first near-Earth-size world to be found in the habitable zone of star that is similar to our sun. The habitable zone is a region around a star where temperatures are right for water - an essential ingredient for life as we know it - to pool on the surface

KEPLER-452B: KEY FACTS

Kepler-452b is 60 per cent larger in diameter than Earth. It is located about 1,400 light years away in the constellation Cygnus.
Although it is larger, it is 385-day orbit is only 5 per cent longer.

The planet is 5 per cent farther from its parent star Kepler-452 than Earth is from the sun.

It has the same temperature, and is 20 per cent brighter and has a diameter 10 per cent larger.

Its sun, Kepler-452, is 6 billion years old, 1.5 billion years older than our sun.

One unanswered question is whether the planet is rocky. Scientists say there's a better than even chance it is.

The planet is about 60 per cent bigger than Earth, and is located about 1,400 light years away in the constellation Cygnus.

Its discovery brings the total number of confirmed planets to 1,030.
Nasa has also found 12 new small habitable zone candidate planets, marking another milestone in the journey to finding another 'Earth.'

It is 'the closest twin to Earth, or the Earth 2.0 that we've found so far in the dataset', said John Grunsfeld, associate administrator of Nasa's Science Mission Directorate.

Kepler-452b is larger than Earth, but its 385-day orbit is only 5 per cent longer.

It resides in something known as the habitable zone - or Goldilocks zone - which is an area around a star where liquid water could pool on the surface of an orbiting planet.

It is also 5 per cent farther from its parent star Kepler-452 than Earth is from the sun.

'This is so fascinating because Kepler 452b receives the same kind of spectrum and intensity of light as we do on Earth,' said Dr Daniel
Brown, an astronomy expert at Nottingham Trent University.

'This means plants from our planet could grow there if it were rocky and had an atmosphere.

'You could even get a healthy tan like here on holiday. Getting to our closest twin planet might take a while though, since it's 1,400 light years away.'

Kepler-452 is 6 billion years old, 1.5 billion years older than our sun, has the same temperature, and is 20 per cent brighter and has a diameter 10 per cent larger.



edit on 23-7-2015 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)

edit on 7/23/2015 by Blaine91555 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 06:36 PM
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a reply to: theabsolutetruth

Well there are probably a few more than 8 small planets in their respective HZ's...as of June 2015 there were 2026 confirmed exoplanets...You can see the list here. That list is compiled by these people: openexoplanetcatalogue.com...

Kepler 452 isn't in the June release, so I suppose I should update my database.

6 billion years old...that's old enough to have evolved several civilizations like we have here on Earth. Wonder what kind of atmosphere it might have?



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 07:06 PM
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I don't get excited about other planets like earth out there. It's not like any of us will ever get to go to one.

I will give them props though.

Finding an Earth like planet though.

It's like finding a needle in a billion,billion,billion etc haystacks.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 07:11 PM
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another planet like ours?

did they get shot out of a planet maker assembly line somewhere?



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 07:16 PM
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a reply to: tanka418

It is a planet, in a system with a star of similar qualities, in an orbit very similar to that of earth. A beautiful discovery.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 07:25 PM
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a reply to: neo96




I don't get excited about other planets like earth out there. It's not like any of us will ever get to go to one.


I see that attitude a lot, and though I agree to an extent, think perhaps we're thinking about it in the wrong way.

We are now at a point where we can find other planets like our own. That is freaking amazing. It is mind blowing. The technological achievements humanity has uh, achieved, are incredible.

It's also important to remember this is a stepping stone, and part of what is going to be an amazing history! The first time two computers were able to communicate plugged into a network doesn't sound all that exciting or get my nipples hard thinking about, but look what that little step has led to! We can't find life unless we're looking, and every planet that can support life similar to our own suggests that we're on the right track, and that the Universe is teeming with it. That's pretty freaking exciting, even if we don't get to see it!

Yeah, maybe we're not seeing little green men zipping around in hover cars, but we're now aware that life like our own has places it can thrive, and with more and more evidence, and more and more planets, we're bound to run across one and think hey, that measurement suggests that something is alive and manipulating the planet!



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 07:35 PM
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The Cygnus-Giza correlation came to mind when I read about an earth like planet orbiting Cygnus. A spacecraft that can accelerate at a constant 1G would ony take 13 years to travel between Earth and Cygnus.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 07:52 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 07:55 PM
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a reply to: neo96

Maybe they can use the telescope to find me some winning lotto numbers.
Ill even sign a binding document that I'll help fund all their operations from then on.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 08:07 PM
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u might be right

a reply to: Jonjonj



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 08:08 PM
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yep

a reply to: snowen20



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 09:52 PM
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A shadow of a dot passing another shadow of a dot.

All else is fantasy.



posted on Jul, 24 2015 @ 10:58 AM
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originally posted by: glend
The Cygnus-Giza correlation came to mind when I read about an earth like planet orbiting Cygnus. A spacecraft that can accelerate at a constant 1G would ony take 13 years to travel between Earth and Cygnus.


Remember it would have to flip half-way there and decelerate at the same rate to come to a complete stop at the right place.



posted on Jul, 24 2015 @ 02:14 PM
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originally posted by: blacktie
another planet like ours?

did they get shot out of a planet maker assembly line somewhere?

I swear, I saw a movie like that once...



posted on Aug, 1 2015 @ 03:59 PM
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The real question should be have the aliens on that planet ever found Earth? If they have, and if they possess 5x SOL flight, they could be here by dinner time.
Since no one's here yet, and never has been, we could rest easy they aint eating us.
As for humans getting there, well, we cant even seem to get to Mars anytime soon.




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