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Depth effect when using just one eye

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posted on Jul, 22 2015 @ 09:59 AM
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I'd like to share something I've seen mentioned years and years ago somewhere, about how you can gain a sense of depth (the 3D effect) when looking at a photo with just one eye.

Try it yourself some time: shut one eye and look at a photo with the other... keep looking, and eventually the scene in the photo will start looking 3D. This might happen almost straight away, or take a while, so go ahead and experiment.

Here's a random image to try it out:



The way I look at it (no pun intended), is that the camera captures a 3D scene using only one "eye" i.e. the lens. Perhaps the camera records more than just the flat 2D projection of the scene, and by looking at the image in the same way the camera recorded it, we restore that information... Or perhaps it's just a brain trick. But by looking at a photo with both eyes, we destroy that perception of depth. So, perhaps, looking at photos with just one eye is the right way to do it.

[Edit] I see there has been even some scientific research into this: www.bbc.co.uk...

Dr Vishwanath said: "We have demonstrated experimentally, for the first time, that the same 'special way' in which depth is experienced in 3D movies can also be experienced by looking at a normal picture with one eye viewing through a small aperture (circular hole).

"While this effect has been known for a long time, it is usually dismissed.

"Now we have shown that it is in fact real, and the perceptual results are exactly like stereoscopic 3D, the kind seen in 3D movies.

edit on 22-7-2015 by wildespace because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 22 2015 @ 10:07 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

If the round rock wasn't a lighter shade than the background the illusion probably wouldn't work. Speaking from experience ( I only have one eye) I can assure you I don't see the world in 3-d......LOL!!!
It's taken me almost 3 yrs for my brain to compensate.

Beautiful picture tho!!
Where was it taken?



posted on Jul, 22 2015 @ 10:24 AM
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Glad to meet another pirate , high curbs and hitting the trash can from across the room still gives me trouble, and shooting a bow sucks if yardage isn't marked out. I still don't see the ops pic in 3 d, it looks flat to me. a reply to: Caver78



posted on Jul, 22 2015 @ 10:25 AM
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originally posted by: Caver78
a reply to: wildespace

If the round rock wasn't a lighter shade than the background the illusion probably wouldn't work. Speaking from experience ( I only have one eye) I can assure you I don't see the world in 3-d......LOL!!!
It's taken me almost 3 yrs for my brain to compensate.

Beautiful picture tho!!
Where was it taken?

The picture is from a Russian island in the Arctic Ocean, according to this source: brian-mountainman.blogspot.co.uk...

As for your situation, I think people with two eyes will get the depth effect because that's how they see the world around them every day, and the brain will make that interpretation of a photo much easier. Some photos might work better than others, so do try this on different ones.



posted on Jul, 22 2015 @ 12:25 PM
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originally posted by: chopperswolf
Glad to meet another pirate , high curbs and hitting the trash can from across the room still gives me trouble, and shooting a bow sucks if yardage isn't marked out. I still don't see the ops pic in 3 d, it looks flat to me. a reply to: Caver78



TOO COOL!!!!
Playing frisbee is definitely out....actually accurately catching anything is just ridiculous! Stairs are still "exciting" and the killer is......ready for it.....forget being able to tailgate in traffic.

Wow! nice to meet ya!!



posted on Jul, 22 2015 @ 01:00 PM
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a reply to: wildespace

I have been blind in one eye for most of my life .I remember going to my first and last 3D movie when I was a teen. It's all mono to me but I am very good at judging distance for some strange reason .



posted on Jul, 22 2015 @ 01:22 PM
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I did a little research on this subject, but my information is reliant on the interpretation of the research and scientists who wrote the article. I will try to summarize what I know about depth perception.

The first thing is to explain why I researched the subject after hearing that you need two eyes to be able to have depth perception many times in my life. A friend of mine has a glass eye and he has depth perception and is a good driver. So I figured I would do some research on the subject and with the aid of the internet and reading a dozen research articles on it, I found a good one. I was also investigating why people cannot see what is evident in the rocks I had from a picture. Our brain actually needs input from depth perception and couples it with what we have seen in person to identify something from a picture.

We have two eyes and with these eyes we can use depth perception, which is achieved in the brain with a combination of signals. Now this is well known. Now with one eye you can get depth perception also, using the minds ability to assemble it. We constantly shut one eye off alternating our vision when one eye tires.

Now, when we look through one eye we will either move our head or move our eye a little to establish needed motion which the mind can generate depth perception from. We are not usually aware we are doing this, we have done it all of our life so it is automatic. Just because we do not know we are doing it does not mean we aren't. The image we see of the moon does not look like what most of us see, we center the image and it makes a nice sharp moon. Actually there are multiple energy images overlapping created by our atmosphere, it cannot be a sharp image of the moon, our minds center and interpret this image. When you are tired, the moon looks a little blurry sometimes as it also does when you dope this section of the brain with alcohol. Things get blurry from a tired section of the brain that governs our filtering and centering of the image. Actually most things are blurry in reality, the article showed what something would look like if this part of the brain is not working right. It is blurry, glasses may not help this type of vision blur but diet can.

So in this image, you close one eye and force your mind to form a depth perception based on all recorded memories you have made to interpret the image. Our interpretations of what we see are a direct result of what we have learned and of our beliefs. Even our interpretation of color can alter other perceptions, if you put orange food coloring in apple juice, it can taste like crappy orange juice but once you close your eyes you will know it is apple juice. The knowledge of this kind of thing can be used to con us. Someone can take apple juice, put it in an orange juice carton and put orange coloring in it and we will think it is OJ. It has been done and way more than people think.

So I hope I haven't confused anyone with this. We see what we know or believe, not always what really is.



posted on Jul, 22 2015 @ 01:42 PM
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Photographers use all kinds of methods to get the image they want and that is especially true when you can preview your images with a good monitor built into the backs of cameras so actually the images are taken with the understanding that the viewer will be using 2 eyes so DOF can be manipulated with F stops, lenses etc.

Perhaps i missed the gist of this. If so then i would just add that a human eye is much different than a camera. Personally i have not seen much of an issue regarding depth perception using one eye or two...but, idk, i think that depth perception is actually better with two eyes.

Regarding 3D, and someone correct me if i am wrong, the main concept of 3D is the utilization of shadows, other than that making one object larger to give the impression of depth is just a stop gap trick and all images are, of course and in reality, two dimensional.



posted on Jul, 22 2015 @ 01:50 PM
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a reply to: the2ofusr1

So there are three of us on ATS.....
Glad this thread got everyone chatting.





posted on Jul, 22 2015 @ 02:12 PM
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a reply to: Caver78

I drove tractor trailer for years and have golfed and shot rifle and archery competitively . I think some of what Rickey posted might explain it as to how we can use other Q points to arrive at the same conclusions .



posted on Jul, 22 2015 @ 02:15 PM
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a reply to: Harvin

For me watching a 3D movie I had the option of half a picture or two images at the same time . It was a mess and a complete waste of time and money . no fun what so ever .



posted on Jul, 22 2015 @ 02:24 PM
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Cool! I've known about and have been doing this for years. It's fun to look back on my Grand Canyon vacation photos and do this trick. But my husband can't seem to accomplish this. He had lazy eye as a child and was somewhat blind in one eye and even after surgery he doesn't have the best depth perception.

For anyone who can do this, it comes in handy looking at real estate photos. You catch details you'd otherwise easily overlook and it almost feels like actually being present at the location.

Thanks for sharing this find.



posted on Jul, 22 2015 @ 03:52 PM
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It's the one-eyed men's convention here.

Although I have speculated about the mechanics of what I described, my post is primarily to share this curious find that I have discovered and enjoyed over the years - getting a sense of depth when looking at a photo with just one eye. Sometimes, the effect is very clear and astounding. That is why I hope that at least some of you will try it and get the same effect.

It might be purely our brain's capability to "allocate" what you see in a photo into a 3-dimensional space, the same way we're used to see things in the real world with two eyes. If so, the brain is even more wondrous than I have thought.



posted on Jul, 22 2015 @ 08:14 PM
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a reply to: wildespace

Thanks for this thread. As a young man working on constructions decades ago, I was struck with the ability of a 'dozer driver to evenly cut a grade with his blade. I remarked on that ability to him and he showed me that he only had one eye. I could hardly believe he could have that skill, but, of course, I knew it for a fact. And now I know how he did it!



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 12:34 AM
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Nice thread. I too see the world through my 'one good eye.' It's been this way all my life so it doesn't seem odd. Loved reading that there are others here who see things differently .Yes 3D movies are a waste of money and just weird looking, no one has ever really understood why. I don't know another living person who is blind in one eye, so your stories are really enjoyable. Thanks for all the info.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 01:06 AM
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I was reading the other day that a substantial population doesn't have depth perception, and for many, a 3-D movie was the first time they've ever experienced 3-D!



Depending on whom you ask, it affects somewhere between 3 and 15 percent of the world's population, which creates an interesting demographic hurdle for the 3D television industry. Some people are stereoblind because their vision in one eye is severely impaired, others because their brains are unable to coalesce images from both eyes into a three-dimensional result.


The guy in the article finally saw 3D for the first time after using a Nintendo 3DS!

Article



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 01:28 AM
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So does this mean the old idea that we need two eyes to triangulate positions of things is bunk? Or does it mean something else?

I found this:
www.cns.nyu.edu - Perception Lecture Notes: Depth, Size, and Shape...

It shows in that link that with one eye we do have some depth perception, but "there is inherent ambiguity between size and distance."

This:
en.wikipedia.org - Depth perception.,.
edit on 23-7-2015 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 10:10 AM
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originally posted by: jonnywhite
So does this mean the old idea that we need two eyes to triangulate positions of things is bunk? Or does it mean something else?
If the position of your head is fixed, then of course you need two eyes to judge distance using stereo vision but it only works to a certain distance, probably around 30 meters away for most people. Beyond about 30 meters the difference seen by the two eyes doesn't have sufficient resolution for depth perception, and we use other cues, which are spelled out in the link you posted.


originally posted by: rickymouse
Now, when we look through one eye we will either move our head or move our eye a little to establish needed motion which the mind can generate depth perception from. We are not usually aware we are doing this, we have done it all of our life so it is automatic. Just because we do not know we are doing it does not mean we aren't.
It's quite likely that some people can get depth perception with one eye using this method, but probably not everybody can as it takes processing skills which may not be built-in for everybody. But basically what you're saying is put your one eye in the position of a left eye then move it so it's in the position of the right eye, and from these two perspectives you have the same information that a person with two eyes has, so it all boils down to how effectively you can process this information, a skill that probably varies from person to person, which in fact even people with two eyes have varying skill levels in discerning depth.


The image we see of the moon does not look like what most of us see, we center the image and it makes a nice sharp moon.
For all practical purposes related to human stereo vision, the distance to the moon is "infinity" meaning both eyes should see the same thing. As I said earlier, depth perception using the resolution of human eyes spaced a normal distance apart probably isn't effective beyond much over 30 meters, and the moon is way over 30 meters away.

The other cues we can use are the same ones photographic analysts use, like the greater the distance in a photograph, typically the greater the haze. This is used in analyzing UFO photos for example when someone holds a small model close to the camera and it dosn't have enough haze as a larger UFO further away would if it were real...this was one of the problems with Billy Meier's model UFO photos.

There are many other cues to distance like in the link jonnywhite posted, it refers to railroad ties appearing to get smaller and smaller as the track is further away. You don't need stereo vision to see this, a single photograph or single eye will see this and other cues.

edit on 2015723 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 12:34 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

From what I read, which seems logical and has been researched, a movement of the eye is all it needs, it creates a minute change which the mind can evaluate. The ability of the mind to evaluate this would be necessary though, as you said.

Another important thing is that to utilize this you would need to know it exists. Anotherwards if you were born without one eye you may never know how to use it. But I think after bumping into things a lot a person with one eye would be able to learn how to use it subconsciously. Our subconscious is involved in most of these things, we do not realize what we are doing, it is automatic. People who said you could not get depth perception in the past could not comprehend this could be possible so they denied it for a long time and still may be denying it. The mind is way more complex than people think.

The moon thing is altogether different, our mind centers the image. The moon actually interacts with the atmospher and the image is really blurry but we translate the information and make it sharp with our minds. The article did not explain how this exactly worked. I was researching because I was having a blurry moon, almost like three overlapping moons, when I was tired. I thought it was possibly my eyes but it was not, it is relating to filtering. Possibly from my temporal lobe epilepsy. I only noticed it after the accident which caused the TLE but didn't research it till about a year and a half ago when I was at the airport. I just thought I might be having eye problems. It isn't eye problems, glasses cannot help this. In fact, after I removed the high amounts of junk food from my diet, I can see much better, I can read the paper no problem and focus a lot better at all distances. I have to eat enough veggies or a some braunsweiner occasionally or things get a little blurry. It is surprising how you are forced to learn things consciously when your subconscious gets a little messed up from TLE



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 07:45 PM
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Hello,
Count me in too, I have a bad astigmatism in my right eye .......judging road crossings at night is a good test of the depth perception(relation) ability to say the least. Others say" what're waiting for?" while I use other cues to judge the speed... another issue is a car with a a pillar that leans in too far blocking alot of vision ....



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