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special forces profiles

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posted on Oct, 14 2005 @ 01:08 AM
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please tell me about the SS...

you cant be serious, right? where do you get this information from?

i read back to last years pages in this topic and found a bunch of hooey from everybody claiming they know everything about the world's special ops organizations. one of them that really got me was that there was some idiot claiming that the spetsnaz instructors "hit" you in training. wow. so amazing. guess what? in the 1960's the USMC DI's were allowed to hit you and cuss about your mother while doing it. they quickly noted that that indeed did not accomplish much with morale much less usefulness in training.

about the Waffen SS...

no. im sorry. the Waffen SS, unlike the Heer, was a very loose-knit community of officers and enlisted, and they all trained together with extreme efficiency and went on a first name basis. many soldiers elected for themselves to stay in the Heer, noting how the SS was not as strict. many top officers and most of the enlisted in the Heer frowned upon the waffen SS because they thought they were rather ragtag and informal compared to themselves. they were not even required to salute eachother. this eased the tension in training and allowed for more important things to sink in...like weapons techniques. some of the facets of SS training are still in use today. but dont even think for a minute they were killed by their instructors or punished severely like being hit. that type of formal punishment never existed in the SS, especially in training. the training was tough, but no more than the US Rangers' training was. in fact the SS was terrible when they recieved their baptism-by-fire. but they learned from their mistakes the hard way from the enemy (us) and soon became a deadly force.

[edit on 14-10-2005 by CACowboyUSN]




posted on Oct, 14 2005 @ 01:32 AM
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and again, all of this "POLISH GROM IS BEST OMGOMG LOL!!!" and "NAVY SEALS SUCK COMPARED TO THE LOLZ!!!! GIGNSPETSNAZGSG9!!!!! LOL!" is TOTAL bs. NONE OF YOU have ever talked to ANY experts on ANY of these subjects. TOM CLANCY is a VERY reputable source. and none of you have talked to him.

none of you have ever seen any of these units train.
none of you have ever been in one of these units.
none of you have the cohones to even try.
none of you know what you might think you know.

i could say that DELTA FORCE is the bestest!!! LOL! yet, that would be a target for a response such as "NO!!!!! WTFOMG RUSSIAN SPETSNAZ!!! OMGOMG soooo much better! or GIGN they shoot people in the LEG! that makes them so good. lolz. or HOW ABOUT THE POLISH GROM! THE SAS! THE NEW ALPHASIERRAFOXTROT FORCE THAT AUSTRAILIA HAS!"

go get a job dudes, seriously. how about you join your country's respective military branch and go and try to get in to these units you speak so highly about?

by the way, no professional special operations person would ever say that their unit is better than another.

and also, training is training. there is no nation that trains their special operations assets harder or more comprehensively than we train ours (USA). our country has their training down to a science, and knows what works on a man and what doesnt. they know how other groups train, and they alter their regimen as they see fit. nobody sets a standard for training. not one group. other nations may train as hard or as extensively as the US, but not more than. if you dont believe me, read some books please. i suggest starting with tom clancy nonfiction. and then i suggest actually buying some real books. you guys have some serious napoleon complexes going on when it comes to your favorite "special ops".



posted on Oct, 14 2005 @ 02:09 AM
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This is my take, and tomorrow I will read the entire thread.

I am a US Soldier, Former Marine. Our structure is this:
Army Rangers: Volunteer, used mainly for large scale special operations like taking over airports.
Special Forces (Green Berets): Volunteer, specializing in training other militaries plus small team behind the enemy lines operations.
Marine Recon: Volunteer, Mainly Recon to collect intelligence.

Marine Force Recon: Volunteer, they are just like the Navy Seals and train with them a lot.

Navy Seals: Volunteer one of the best and they do everything from hostage rescue to clearing beaches for Marines to land.

Army Delta Force: SELECTED, you can not volunteer for Delta, you need to be selected. That tells you right there that they take the best of the best.

As far as that goes, tomorrow I will go more in depth with all the other Spec Ops teams around the world like the German GSG9, MUSSAD(sp?), Spetznaz……etc.



posted on Oct, 14 2005 @ 07:11 AM
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And lets not forget one thing:
SpecOps make movies
Soldiers make history



posted on Oct, 14 2005 @ 02:43 PM
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Okay guys my thread is not about who's the best. Stop doing this I don't want my thread to be locked.



posted on Oct, 18 2005 @ 10:48 AM
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Who said that is what the thread was turning into?

So far this is a great thread and I never say who is better than who. They are all tough hombres and all the same for the most part.



posted on Oct, 18 2005 @ 02:08 PM
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Hiya Blue Cell. Long time coming but here goes.

47 (pronounced fourseven not 47) Squadron RAF is THE transport Sqn in the RAF.

They are based (for the time being until our
Labour Government closes it!) at RAF Lyneham in wet and windy Wiltshire on the great Salisbury Plain.

Four Seven is an Air Despatch Squadron whose nickname in the 70s used to be 'Yimkim Airways' but more often than not, just simply called
'Scareways'.

Originally, way back in the dawn of the earliest manned flights - 50s and 60s [LOL] they used aircraft like the Beverleys, Hastings and Belfasts.

Then some bright spark at MOD (Air) decided to do away with them and purchase the Argosy or as we called it '40,000 rivets flying in loose formation!. The reason? After a few hundred hours, 'things' started to fall off the ac.

Then some even brighter spark decided to purchase the C-130 from Lockhead and Four Seven has not looked back since.

Wherever there is a conflict, you'll find them there; Wherever there is famine or flood, you'll also find them there; Disaster reflief - again they'll be there!

They have some of the best pilots in the world flying those Hercs and my God
they can make them bank, climb, dive and turn almost as gracefully as a Spit on heat!

Tasking is simple.

1. Deploy the SAS/SBS and/or the Parachute Brigades behind enemy lines;
2. Deliver combat ready troops as near to the FEBA as possible;
3. Deliver combat stores: munitions, food and water etc behind enemy lines or as close to the FEBA as possible;
4. TALO against lightly defended airfields;
5. Inserting and supporting II Sqn RAF Regiment in their revised war role. (Don't ask :dn


They are NOT an SF Sqn. Others do that job.

Why were they called 'Scareways'? Dead simple. You try flying in a Herc doing Nap-Of-The-Earth/Terrain-Following in the middle of the night, without lights at 50 feet, through mountainous regions.

Need a barfbag and several pairs of brown undies!



posted on Oct, 18 2005 @ 02:52 PM
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Commachio:

They are an elite component of the British Royal Marines, are responsible for guarding British nuclear weapons and ballistic missile submarines. Known as the Commachio Group, the unit was first formally activated in May 1980. The key naval installation they guard is the Royal Naval Armament Depot (RNAD) Coulport in Scotland, where British ballistic missile submarine (SSBN) missiles and warheads are stored. Commachio commandos escort the submarine out to open waters, ostensibly to protect it from terrorist attacks and anti-nuclear demonstrators.

The unit is named after Lake Commachio, north of Ravenna, Italy, where Royal Marine Tom Hunter won the Victoria Cross in World War II. Commachios were selected from Royal Marine commando units and the number eventually grew to number 350. Other missions that they have responsibility for include anti-smuggling operations and protection of U.K. oil rigs in the North Sea.

Brigade Patrol Group:[Unit Profile courtesy Mr. Ryan Wulfsohn]

Unit Profile
Primary role: instruction in mountain and arctic warfare
Secondary role: long range reconnaissance patrolling for 3 Commando Brigade
Location: Stonehouse Barracks, Plymouth, Devon, UK

The Mountain Leader Training Cadre (MLTC) is the Royal Marines unit with the responsibility for maintaining the corps' expertise in mountain and arctic warfare. Though it is primarily a group of instructors, in wartime it would provide additional recce patrols for 3rd Commando Brigade, together with the full-time Reconnaissance Troop forming the Brigade Patrol Group.

MOUNTAIN LEADER TRAINING CADRE:

The MLTC originated in the early 1950s as the Cliff Assault Wing. As the name suggests, the main mission in those days was to get troops and equipment up coastal cliffs. However Cliff Leaders, as the members were known, also carried out exercises to improve their own climbing, originally in Wales and Scotland, but later also in Austria, Norway, Canada and the Alps. In 1962 the wing was renamed the Cliff Assault Troop, by which time it had begun training in general winter warfare techniques. Thus the CLs were called upon to prepare the men of No.43 Commando for the first Norwegian exercise carried out by the Royal Marines in October 1962. Several years later it was decided to increase the troop's expertise by putting all members through a reconnaissance course run by the Platoon Weapons Branch at the Commando Training Centre Royal Marines (CTCRM), Lympstone. This was done in 1965 and the unit now became known as the Reconnaissance Leader Troop.

Mountain & Arctic Warfare Cadre:

In 1970 the RL Troop became the Mountain & Arctic Warfare Cadre and moved to its present location at Stonehouse Barracks, Plymouth. The following year 3 Commando Brigade returned to the UK after several years in the Far East. The brigade's main mission now was to be on NATO's northern flank and annual exercises were to be conducted in Norway. These were (and are) usually in the winter and in the far north of the country. The M&AW Cadre had a big role to play in preparing the four Commandos for these exercises and Mountain Leaders were attached to all units in the brigade. (43 Commando had already been disbanded and 41 Commando was to follow in 1981.) Soon 3 Commando Brigade was among the world's leading exponents of cold weather warfare, thanks mainly to a small group of specialists who had been developing the necessary expertise for many years.

The Cadre was also given the wartime role of long range foot and ski reconnaissance for the brigade. In the Falklands War of 1982 the twenty members of the Cadre and twenty men undergoing training as MLs accompanied 3 Commando Brigade " down south ". Their war began immediately after the landings of 21 May. Four-man patrols were inserted all over the brigade's area of operations, in some cases relieving patrols of the SAS and SBS, and also mounting operations in cooperation with the latter. On 31 May a patrol spotted Argentine commandos (Buzo Tactico) landing by helicopter near Top Malo House, in the far north of East Falkland and just south of the proposed British route to Port Stanley. A request for an air strike on the Argentineans now setting up base in the house was denied; instead nineteen more MLs under their commander, Captain Rod Boswell, were flown in an hour after dawn. After landing one group opened fire on the Argentines with 66mm rockets and light machine guns, setting the house on fire, while the others began the assault on the enemy. In the subsequent 40 minute battle four MLs were wounded; of the 17 Buzo Tactico, 8 were killed and 9 captured.

The M&AW Cadre operated in the mountains of northern Iraq in 1991, during Operation Haven, the Allied effort to bring aid to the Kurdish separatists then under heavy attack from the Iraqis. MLs worked in cooperation with US Army Special Forces and also the other elements of 3 Commando Brigade in the area. In 1992 it was decided to set up a permanent brigade-level reconnaissance unit. The Recce Troop was formed with the officer and NCOs coming from the Cadre. It has since been separated from the renamed Mountain Leader Training Cadre.

The Mountain Leader Class 2 (ML2) course is open junior officers of the Royal Marines and other ranks that have passed their Junior Command Course i.e. have been promoted to corporal or soon will be. All will have of course passed the Commando tests in their initial period of training (about 15 months for officers, half that for other ranks), and many will have gone on to gain other qualifications, like sniping, anti-tanks or mortars. ML2 training takes about eight months and is considered some of the toughest in the British military. The course starts in September and the first week is spent on the selection phase, at Stonehouse Barracks in Plymouth. Those who are accepted go on to a couple of weeks of climbing in Cornwall, especially on cliffs, and including free climbing (without ropes) at night. Candidates often spend 12 hours a day climbing at this stage. In October the course moves to Wales, for practice in climbing larger mountains. This month also sees the survival course on the Isle of Islay, off the west coast of Scotland, and the first period of resistance to interrogation (RTI) training. In November the candidates begin to combine mountain work with patrolling and raiding. December sees more climbing and preparation for the next phase in northern Norway. Shortly after Christmas the course moves to the rugged and freezing terrain of this area. Here the initial emphasis is on snow and ice climbing techniques and Arctic survival and navigation. Although all candidates would have gone through Arctic Survival and Arctic Warfare training during previous service in Norway, they are now also learning how to instruct on these courses. Candidates could now probably find themselves more often than not 10 000 feet (3000m) up in the mountains, with the temperature dropping to -40 F at night (including wind chill factor ). In February it is time for long distance skiing under the supervision of Norwegian Army instructors. All candidates must qualify as Military Ski Instructors. Before the final exercise in March they are given seven days to prepare. The eleven-day exercise itself involves the four-man patrols ski-marching and climbing up to 40km a day, to carry out a close target reconnaissance and attack and then infiltration to friendly territory. They will have covered about 300km by this time. All are eventually " captured " and go through the second RTI period. The course ends in April with 3 weeks of path finding on Ben Nevis, the highest mountain in Scotland. The pass rate is sometimes as low as 20%. After qualifying most ML2s will return to duty with a Commando, some will be attached to Army units and a few might join the Recce Troop. Every sub-unit in 3 Commando Brigade of company, battery or squadron size has a Mountain Leader (usually a corporal) attached, who is responsible for mountain and arctic warfare training. MLs are also highly sought after to provide the leadership in each Commando's own Reconnaissance Troop. NCOs may now wear the branch Specialist Qualification badge, “ML " surrounded by a wreath. This is worn on the left cuff of No.1 Dress (" blues") and Lovat service dress (" greens "). RM officers do not wear SQ badges.

Corporals wishing to gain promotion to sergeant in the branch must pass the ML1 course. Officers are not considered to have time to attend this course. Prospective ML1s must have passed the Senior Command Course at Lympstone. They begin their training in September by instructing the early part of the ML2 course. They also go to Wales, to improve their own standards in climbing. In November they are detached to Commando units for assessment as instructors by qualified ML1s. This continues the next month with preparation for 3 Commando Brigade's annual Norwegian exercise. January and February are spent in Norway itself, with the candidates training the members of their units, especially those new to the brigade, in arctic warfare and survival, and generally assisting in the exercises. In March they join the ML2 course for the final exercise, mainly as patrol commanders. ML1 candidates continue on to Ben Nevis for practice in route selection and navigation. On completion of the course ML1s will be able to wear two stars above the SQ badge. Most become members of the permanent ML cadre.

Recce Troop

In 1992, during a period of reorganization in 3 Commando Brigade, it was decided that a permanent Medium Range Reconnaissance Troop would be formed. Usually referred to as Recce Troop, it was to form part of the Headquarters and Signal Squadron. Initially there were four 6-man patrols, each with an ML sergeant, two ML corporals and three General Duties (GD) Marines, i.e. men drawn from a Commando. In command was an ML lieutenant. Today there are six four-man patrols.

All members have gone through the sniper course at Lympstone, lasting six weeks, and a 3-week static line parachute course at RAF Brize Norton. Those who have not yet qualified as ML2s will have been trained by the Mountain Leaders to Reconnaissance Leader (RL) standard.

Recce Troop concentrates on training in the same disciplines as the Cadre: in climbing and cliff assault, cold-weather survival, long range patrolling on ski and foot, long range communications, high altitude mountaineering, snow and ice climbing, target and route reconnaissance, primary interrogation and resistance to interrogation, and sabotage. In addition many members will have gone through the Army's Jungle Long Range Patrol Course, run in Brunei. Some also train as specialists in desert warfare, for the Royal Marines must be ready to deploy almost anywhere in the world. Later members may go through advanced training as divers and/or free-fall (HALO) parachutists. During operations Recce Troop patrols could operate on their own or in conjunction with other elements of the Brigade Reconnaissance Force (BRF) which includes Y Troop, the Royal Marines' own electronic warfare sub-unit; the Recce Troop of 59 Independent Commando Squadron Royal Engineers, four 4-man patrols who are all Commando and parachute qualified; teams from 148 Commando Forward Observation Battery Royal Artillery; and a squadron of twelve Scimitar tracked reconnaissance vehicles, armed with 30mm cannon, and four Striker anti-tank vehicles, with Swingfire missiles. This last element (recently it was B Squadron of the Household Cavalry) is the only none “Green Hatted" part of the brigade. Recce Troop would generally operate at a longer range than the Recce Troops in the three Commandos. While the SBS still maintains the responsibility for beach reconnaissance, Recce Troop will help with the Initial Terminal Guidance for a large-scale landing. Besides parachuting in, patrols could be transported by craft from 539 Assault Squadron Royal Marines, including air-cushion vehicles and Rigid Raiders.

Blue Mate - hope this is of some use to you.



posted on Oct, 18 2005 @ 03:22 PM
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Hey fritz, just a little note mate....the RM stuff is mostly done...I kinda got everything about it...I think..



posted on Oct, 19 2005 @ 03:52 PM
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Originally posted by CACowboyUSN
please tell me about the SS...

you cant be serious, right? where do you get this information from?



[edit on 14-10-2005 by CACowboyUSN]


From a book called Hitler! By Albert Marrin



posted on Oct, 20 2005 @ 09:30 PM
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"MISSIONS:
conduct special reconnaissance missionsrapid direct action strikes to seize, recover,
or destroy designated personnel or materiel.

long-term foreign internal defense and
counter-insurgency

short term operations to provide
assistance to friendly governments

ORGANIZATION:

The 86 man detachment will be commanded by
a lieutenant colonel

Force Reconnaissance Element (30 Personnel)
Commanded by a major,

Four six-man teams headed by a staff sergeant,
and a four-man headquarters cell led by a captain.

Intelligence Element (26 Personnel)

signals intelligence support team
human intelligence exploitation team
radio reconnaissance team
all-source fusion team will assemble, analyze, and
distribute all received intelligence data.

Headquarters Element (22 Personnel)

Supporting Arms Liaison Team

Commanded by a major specializing in field artillery.
three Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company Marines
three radio operators
forward air controller

Medical Support Team
five Navy Corpsman

CRITERIA:

The personnel chosen for assignment to this unit will all
have at least five years experience in a Force Recon MOS
with superior efficiency ratings.

TRAINING:

First Phase will be conducted at Camp Pendleton, Ca

The Force Reconnaissance element will receive the Second
Phase which will be conducted by SEAL personnel at the

Naval Special Warfare Center, Coronado, CA After completion
of this phase, this element will be assigned to SOCOM and will
operate in six month tours with SEAL operations.

This unit will be the first Marine Corps unit assigned to the
U. S. Special Operations Command since it was established in
1986."

Source



posted on Oct, 21 2005 @ 02:08 PM
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Originally posted by punkmonkey14
"MISSIONS:
conduct special reconnaissance missionsrapid direct action strikes to seize, recover,
or destroy designated personnel or materiel.

long-term foreign internal defense and
counter-insurgency

short term operations to provide
assistance to friendly governments

ORGANIZATION:

The 86 man detachment will be commanded by
a lieutenant colonel

Force Reconnaissance Element (30 Personnel)
Commanded by a major,

Four six-man teams headed by a staff sergeant,
and a four-man headquarters cell led by a captain.

Intelligence Element (26 Personnel)

signals intelligence support team
human intelligence exploitation team
radio reconnaissance team
all-source fusion team will assemble, analyze, and
distribute all received intelligence data.

Headquarters Element (22 Personnel)

Supporting Arms Liaison Team

Commanded by a major specializing in field artillery.
three Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company Marines
three radio operators
forward air controller

Medical Support Team
five Navy Corpsman

CRITERIA:

The personnel chosen for assignment to this unit will all
have at least five years experience in a Force Recon MOS
with superior efficiency ratings.

TRAINING:

First Phase will be conducted at Camp Pendleton, Ca

The Force Reconnaissance element will receive the Second
Phase which will be conducted by SEAL personnel at the

Naval Special Warfare Center, Coronado, CA After completion
of this phase, this element will be assigned to SOCOM and will
operate in six month tours with SEAL operations.

This unit will be the first Marine Corps unit assigned to the
U. S. Special Operations Command since it was established in
1986."

Source



Wow in some ways it reminds me of the SS, accept detachment one people are not brutal murders. And not as big, but in the way of organisation. With the and the naval fire support people, and the other groups. The SS had their own elite artillary divisions, motorized rifle divisions, tank divisions. Hmm intresting thanks for the info.



posted on Oct, 24 2005 @ 06:55 PM
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Jaubert (assault at sea, exfiltration, fight in enclosed spaces at sea)
Trepel (assault at sea, exfiltration)
de Penfentenyo (reconnaissance, intelligence)
de Montfort (distance neutralisation, special back-ups)



I want info on these units.



posted on Oct, 24 2005 @ 11:35 PM
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Ask and you shall recieve, my friend

"The "Marine Commandos" of COFUSCO (Commandement des Fusiliers Marins Commandos) provide the French Navy with an elite special operations strike force. COFUSCO currently makes up the naval component of COS, and conducts operations in support of French naval and intelligence services.
During WWII the Free French government raised a number of elite and special operations units to strike at Nazi forces occupying Europe. One of these units was the 1ere Cie. de Fusiliers-Marins Commandos, which consisted of a group of former French naval personnel. Commanded by Commandant Philippe Kieffer, the unit was trained by British Commandos to conduct raids, amphibious operations, and reconnaissance missions along the European coastline.

Upon completion of their training the men were assigned to the French troop of No.10 Inter-Allied (I-A) Commando. Later a second French troop, NO. 8 troop, was raised and added to the Commando. The two units were used as the core of the 1er Bataillon Fusiliers Marins Commandos. The unit conducted a number of operations though out the war. One of their more memorable operations is depicted in the film " The Longest Day".

Between 1945 and 1947 six Commandos were raised and given the names of former Commando officers that had been killed in action. There was also a small unit raised late in war. Known as Commando Pochardier, after its commander at the time, the unit was slated for service in France's South East Asian colonies. The war ended before the unit could deploy and it was tasked with reoccupying French Indochina.

During the French Indochina war the various Marine Commandos operated along the Annon coast, in the Mekong Delta, and in Tonkin. The Commandos conducted raids and amphibious operations against the Viet Minh guerrilla strongholds though out French territory.

In 1953 Commando Hubert was converted into a combat diver unit while Commando Treppel and De Penfentenyo were deployed to Algeria. Commando Francois was converted to a reserve unit. After France's defeat by Viet Minh forces the Commandos were redeployed to Algeria. Upon establishing a new base of operations, the commandos immediately commenced combat operations against communist backed guerrillas; fighting for an independent Algeria.

While conducted combat operations in Algeria, Commandos Hubert, De Penfentenyo, Jaubert, and Treppel were deployed to support the Anglo-French assault on the Suez Canal. With international pressure building to withdraw the invasion force, the commandos were forced to return to their Algerian base. Upon their return to Algeria, the commandos continued to conduct operations until France's withdrawal from Algeria in 1962.

Since taking up residence in France, COFUSCO units have participated in every French military deployment. The assault commandos and Commando Hubert have been extremely active, with Commando Hubert undertaking a number of operations for the DGSE (The French Foreign intelligence service). COFUSCO security units accompany French naval units deploying to overseas ports and secure French naval facilities against attack.

COFUSCO has under gone various reorganizations, and name changes over the years, gaining its current designation in 1983. COFUSCO is based at Lorient, and operates under the direct control of the Navy Chief of Staff and consists of the following units: Four active (Trepel, Jaubert, de Monfort, and Penfentenyo) assault commandos unit, a combat diver unit (Commando Hubert) and a maritime Counter Terrorism (CT) team (GCMC). The assault commandos, GCMC, and Commando Hubert are COFUSCO's special operations component, and operate under the control of COS (the French Special Operations Command). At one time there was a reserve commando (Francois), but apparently this unit has been disbanded.

The assault commandos are composed of approximately 80 men and are subdivided into four sections. Each section specializes in conducting a specific type of operation: assault, beach recon, HALO/HAHO, small boat, handling, combat diving, heavy weapons, sniping, etc. Teams from the various sections may be combined to execute a particular mission, depending on the circumstances.

All aspiring Commandos are drawn from volunteers serving in French Naval units. The troops under go an extensive four-month training and selection course at Lorient, on the coast of France. Upon successfully completing the basic selection course, the trainee will then undertake the French basic airborne course. Once this training is completed any survivors will receive a month of intermediate commando training. This training includes instruction in cliff assaults, rappelling, field training, and intensified physical conditioning. The final stage of training consists of instruction in conducting amphibious operations and small boat handling, while some men are selected to attend the French Combat Diver school.

The Commandos have participated in numerous combat operations over the past few decades. Commandos have supported French peace-keeping operations, and conducted military interventions France's former African colonies.

The Commandos basically have access to any weapon, or equipment on the open market today. Their armory is usually stocked with HK MP-5 series SMGs, the US produced M-16 family of weapons, French produced FAMAS rifles, Swiss manufactured SG- 540 assault rifles, Remington 870 shotguns, various sniper rifles, 60mm mortars, Milan Anti-Tank missiles, US M-203 40mm grenade launchers, and Belgian designed Minimi (US M-249) 5.56mm LMGs"

Source



posted on Oct, 25 2005 @ 10:44 AM
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Wow I never new about those world war II missions, I knew about COFUSCO and GCMC, either way intresting info. Even though I believe deviwasp posted that link, I though those units were seperate from COFUSCO. Anyway thanks for finding that info, learn something new everyday!



posted on Oct, 26 2005 @ 08:19 PM
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The Cabanatuan Raid

Following the 1945 American forces occupation in Luzon, it was discovered that the Japanese had hundreds of American Prisoners of War held in Cabanatuan. The hundreds of American POWs were the survivors of the 75,000 Filipino and American POWs who survived the infamous 85-mile march out of Bataan in 1942, at which point the Filipino POWs were released and the Americans were shipped to Cabanatuan to work details in 300 acres of farmland under the control of machine guns and 20-foot towers. Executions, disease, beatings and starvation took the lives of more than 3,000 in just a few months. Many more were killed by U.S. aircraft and submarines while being transferred to Japan in unmarked vessels.

Just over 500 American POWs were left in Cabanatuan when the 6th Ranger Battalion, led by Lt. Col. Henry Mucci, joined forces with Filipino Guerrillas for flank protection and operational security led by Capt. Juan Pajota and Capt. Eduardo Joson, and the Alamo Scouts who provided forward Reconnaissance and tactical support.

With only 48-hours of planning, the joint forces moved out at dusk on Jan. 30, 1945, on a 30-mile walk to the camp in a mission to save the remaining American POWs of Cabanatuan. P-61 Black Widow pilots flew overhead and distracted the guards while the raiders successfully pulled 516 POWs from the camp. While only two Rangers were killed, over 500 enemy troops were wounded or killed during the raid.

Without the help of Filipino guerrillas holding back a force of 1,000 approaching enemy troops at the nearby Cabu Highway bridge and the Filipino civilians who provided demobilized prisoners with caraboa carts to ride out of the camp, the mission would have been nothing short of impossible
source

I think a movie just came out about this raid, does anybody here know what I'm talking about? Either way intresting story.



posted on Oct, 27 2005 @ 05:03 PM
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Author David Pugliese tells you everything the government doesn't want you to know about the most secret unit in the Canadian military today: Joint Task Force Two. Canada's Secret Commandos goes behind the scenes in uncovering the missions, training and inner workings of Canada's version of Delta Force and the SAS. The book reveals the unit's most secretive plans, including details about their current mission to Afghanistan in the war against terrorism, a bid to rescue Canadian peacekeepers held hostage in Bosnia, an even more dangerous scheme to launch an attack on terrorists in Peru, and commando missions in Nepal and the Central African Republic.

Paperback: 232 pages

source

Looks intresting, I think this is the only book about this unit. Has anybody read it? Tell me what it was like.



posted on Oct, 28 2005 @ 05:10 PM
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Captain Peter Mason served in the SAS during WW2, then as a British intelligence operator for 30 years. A very readable story, heavy on tradecraft and weapons, as Mason pursued German fugitives and penetrated an active IRA cell. 420 pages, many photos.



source


Looks intresting enough, defintly need to get it once I get a job. Anybody here read it?



Special Forces Handbook

Includes sections on:
• General Organization and Mission Statement
• Demolitions
• Air Operations
• Weapons, M1911 to 155mm Howitzer
• Communications
• First Aid
• Survival

source


Oh wow, I can't believe they have books on this. I wonder how true they are? Okay people I'm gonna do about 2 books each post for now on.



posted on Oct, 31 2005 @ 03:02 PM
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Marine, Philippine forces join in live fire drills
Submitted by: 31st MEU
Story by: Computed Name: Sgt. Mike Camacho

CLARK AIR BASE, Republic of the Philippines(Oct. 18, 2005) -- Deep Reconnaissance Platoon Marines with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit trained with Philippine Marines and airmen for live-fire pistol and rifle close quarter battle qualification and training here Oct. 18.

“It gives everyone a chance to see each others’ capabilities and ensures we set a strong presence and example,” said Staff Sgt. Daniel Howe, a 31-year-old Kuyahoga Falls, Ohio native and 1st team leader, DRP, 31st MEU.

For a couple of the Philippine Marines, it was the first time they trained with a pistol.

“This was my first time shooting with a (M1911A1) .45 (caliber) pistol,” said Philippine Marine Pfc. Diego Boncales, reconnaissance Marine, Force Reconnaissance Battalion. “The U.S. Marines are the best to learn from, so I’m glad they were my teachers.”

All service members fired 200-300 rounds on a short-distance firing range at distances starting at 30 yards and progressively moving to as close as 3 yards using both pistols and rifles.

The U.S. Marines observed their counterparts during the dry and live firing drills reinforcing the fundamentals of Marine Corps marksmanship.

“These guys see a lot of action,” said Cpl. Michael Petrucci, a 20-year-old Long Island, N.Y. native and reconnaissance Marine, DRP. “Anyone in the same boat as us, as far as the fight against terrorism goes, then I’ll help teach them how to shoot – I’m all in favor of getting rid of terrorism.”

Following the live-fire drills on the short-distance courses, the service members took their focus to the “Kill House” facility. The “Kill House” is a simulated close-quarter battle site used for urban warfare training.

The U.S. Marines offered their extensive training and experience in the urban combat environment to the Philippine forces for study.

source



Wow I actually found something on the Phillipines Recon Marines! I'm suprised they didn't train with that pistol though I though special forces were suppose to be trained in pretty much every firearm? Either way intresting article.



posted on Nov, 1 2005 @ 12:05 PM
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Its not the type mate, it was the actual pistol..the .45 I believe is not that widely used but correct me if I'm wrong..



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