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special forces profiles

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posted on Aug, 13 2005 @ 10:58 AM
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These guys are crazy! Read the link because I can't copy it.
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Wow reminds me of how effective the US scouts were in the mexican war. These guys really know how to fight, i'm sure were using them in the war in Iraq, and in the greater war against terrorism.




posted on Aug, 17 2005 @ 09:44 AM
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The Special Operations Force (SOF) of the Korean People's Army (KPA) is tasked to conduct raids in enemy rear areas and to perform reconnaissance and intelligence operations. Trained in unconventional warfare tactics, KPA SOF units will attempt to create a second front in the Republic of Korea (ROK) rear with clandestine infiltration and harassment tactics. In addition, raids on targets outside the Korean Peninsula possibly could be conductedThe Ministry of People's Armed Forces (MPAF) divides SOF units into one of three categories: light infantry, reconnaissance, or sniper. Light infantry operations are combat operations conducted with company- or battalion-sized units against military, political, or economic targets. Team-sized elements conduct reconnaissance to collect intelligence or targeting information. Sniper operations (not to be confused with strictly sharpshooting missions) are basically the same as light infantry except they are conducted in team-sized units.
The MPAF controls two primary commands that make up the 70,000-member SOF: the Training Unit Guidance Bureau (TUGB) and the Reconnaissance Bureau (RB). The TUGB and RB, combined with SOF units of the forward and mechanized corps, consist of 23 SOF brigades and 18 independent SOF battalions.

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Intresting article, there mainly trained as disruption forces. Just like back in world war II, and the Korean War. Not that do units are trained like that now, but the emphaise is differnt. Anyway intresting article. Comment for once!



posted on Aug, 17 2005 @ 09:57 AM
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The history of Jala Mengkara Detachment (Denjaka) started on November 4, 1982 when the Indonesian Navy Chief of Staff formed a unit called Navy Special Forces (Pasusla). The existence of Pasusla was urgently needed to counter the terrorism activities in the sea.Upon further development of this unit, Navy chief of staff requested Indonesian Armed Forces commander to form Denjaka. The armed forces commander agreed to this request and since then Denjaka became the Naval Anti-Terror Unit. According to Navy chief of staff direction, Denjaka is a Marines special unit that has the responsibilities to be capable to conduct anti-terror, anti-sabotages, and naval clandestine operations under direct command of armed forces commander.
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I wonder if this unit did any training with seal team six when it was commanded by Marcinko. Because that was seal team six's mission also, to combat terrorism on the high sea's. And to strike them on land too, but either way intresting. I'm sure were doing a lot of exercises with that unit, on searching ships, and the like.



posted on Aug, 17 2005 @ 10:07 AM
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To obtain a certification of amphibious reconnaissance, a regular Marine has to first pass a tough selection and then pass the nine-month rigorous training program that contains the most difficlut curriculum. Thus, this amphibious recon certificate is very similar to commando certificate in Kopassus. To become a Yontaifib troop, a candidate is selected from the Marine Corps who has already fulfilled the thorough mental and physical requirements, and who at least has actively served the corps for two years. The certification of amphibious reconnaissance is so difficult that the passing rate of these candidates in each class is only ten percent.
One of the most challenging exercise in this certification program is to swim underwater for three kilometers with the hands and feet are all tied. Because they are tied, the swimmer has to mimic the way dolphins swim. This swimming style is a training for anticipation of being caught by the enemies and trying to escape by swimming in the river or sea. The escape experience by U.S. Navy Seal members in the Vietnam War is the basis for this training.

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Wow now that is hard! That sounds impossible though, I mean to swim underwater for like 100 metres with your legs, and arms untied is a feet I think? So I can't imagine anyone doing thirty of those with their arms and feet tied. They defintly must come to the surface sometimes! Either way thats really hard. Sounds kinda like a force recon unit. I don't doubt they do exercises with the Phillipines Force Recon and Navy SEAl units.



posted on Aug, 17 2005 @ 10:32 AM
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The Indonesian Air Force (IAF)has its own elite unit, called Air Force Special Forces Corps (Paskhas). Just like any other elite unit in the Army and Navy, Paskhas is the ground combat unit that is capable to operate on land, sea, and air. The difference is that Paskhas is trained to conquer and defend air fields from enemy, and then prepare the air fields to be able to facilitate friendly airplanes to land. This capability is called Front Air Fields Establishment and Management Operation.

The history of Paskhas as the first airborne unit is almost as old as the Republic of Indonesia. Airborne infiltration operation by 14 paratroopers on October 17, 1947 in Kotawaringin, Kalimantan, is marked as the birth date of Paskhas. In the early years of Indonesian Air Force (established on April 9, 1946), these airborne unit is called Air Field Defense Unit (PPP). In April 1952, the Quick-Reaction Unit (PGT) was also established to strengthen the IAF.

As of 1952, the IAF ground units consisted of PPP, PGT, and PSU (Air Defense Unit). On October 15, 1962, PPP and PGT were organized into Air Fields Defense Command (Koppau). Later on May 17, 1966, Koppau was renamed to Quick-Reaction Troops Command (Kopasgat). There were three Kopasgat regiments, each located in Bandung, Jakarta and Surabaya. Kopasgat was transfromed into Special Forces Center in 1985 before became Paskhas on July 7, 1997 based on the official decision of Indonesian Armed Forces Commander.

Today Paskhas has a strength of 3,000 personnels.



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Looks like they were preparing for some major conflicts, maybe there doing the same today, with the China, US, conflict? Either way I'm sure this unit will help us greatly if we ever do get into a major conflict. I could see this unit protection our airbases in time of war, now that I think of it, kinda would sound like vietnam. Hmm intresting...



posted on Aug, 17 2005 @ 07:20 PM
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Batalyon Raiders (Raiders Battalions) were inaugurated on December 22, 2003. The first ten battalions that are Raiders-qualified were formed from eigth Kodam's (Military Territorial Command) assault infantry battalions and two Kostrad's non-airborne infantry battalions.

Each Raiders battalion has a strength of 747 personnels. They receive six-month intensive education and special trainings on modern combat, anti-guerilla, and conventional war. Each battalion is trained to have the combat ability of three regular infantry battalion, like combat ambush and air mobility (i.e. jump from helicopter).

To increase its combat ability, 50 personnel from each battalion will be trained further by Kopassus (Indonesian Army Special Force) on anti-terror and other special combat technique.
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Sounds like Indoneshia is developing these battalions to combat terrorism in its country. Kinda like the counter-narrcotic battalions in South America.



posted on Aug, 17 2005 @ 07:59 PM
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In a Nation where the military has played an influential social and political role since its founding, perhaps no unit has wielded more power -- and seen more combat -- than Kopassus, Indonesia's Special Forces. From the jungles of Irian Jaya to the backrooms of Jakarta's most powerful political figures, this elite group of commandos has influenced nearly every major policy decision taken since its inception in 1952.
Here, for the first time, this secretive and controversial unit is exposed in Kopassus: Inside Indonesia's Special Forces by acclaimed author Ken Conboy. In this new age of terrorism and counter-terrorism, and especially in the wake of the October 2002 Bali bombing, understanding Kopassus is an integral part of understanding the politics of modern Indonesia. This book is essential reading for anyone interested in unconventional warfare, contemporary Indonesian history, and the brushfire wars that have swept the Indonesian archipelago.
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Looks intresting enough, thats the only book I've heard of about indoneshian special forces.


I'll post more books, once I find them.



posted on Aug, 17 2005 @ 08:35 PM
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During the Cold War the Soviets' elite naval spetsnaz units earned the grudging respect of the world's special operations forces as the Eastern Bloc's toughest, best-trained commandos. Available for the first time in the West, this book tells the dramatic, action-packed story of the World War II forerunners of those spetsnaz - the naval ground reconnaissance detachments - as they led the Soviet advance through the Crimea with the Black Sea Fleet and through southeastern Europe with the Danube Flotilla. Readers follow the expert swimmers, parachutists, skiers, mountain climbers, marksmen, and hand-to-hand combat specialists on one impossible mission after another, working behind German lines to gather intelligence and conduct partisan and diversionary-demolition operations. With prices on their heads, and hounded by ever growing numbers of German SS troops, the commandos lived by their wits and off the land, fighting their way out of every dangerous situation, blowing up bridges and fortifications, ambushing German patrols, snatching prisoners, and reporting enemy strengths. Commandos from the Sea reads like the best action/adventure fiction. Based on interviews and archival research, this unique contribution to the history of special operations is a moving human drama of unorthodox characters who volunteer for suicide missions out of love for country, each other, and their commander, Senior Lieutenant Viktor Kalganov - known as "The Beard." Mr. Strekhnin's is the only account in English that details this little-known special warfare unit.
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Wow that is so cool, I never new they had a naval special forces unit in world war II, intresting book! If anybody has read it U2 me with info about it, it really sounds intresting.



posted on Aug, 17 2005 @ 08:41 PM
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France today maintains a strong global presence. Investment bankers may have replaced foreign legionnaires in Africa, Indo-China and the Middle East. but French government and business plays an active role throughout the world. To safeguard foreign installations and individuals, and to provide security for Metropolitan France itself. France has concentrated all its air land and sea special forces in a single Special Operations Command, or COS.
As always, the many illustrations gathered here by Histoire & Collections are of inestimable value to collectors, gamers and military buffs. Micheletti opens up an unknown (in the U.S.) world of intrigue and special warfare. French special forces are active in Guiana, Chad Tahiti and Diibouti, facing everything from well-intentioned environmentalists to hard-core terrorists. COS also provides extra security for French forces in Saudi Arabia and Bosnia.

American readers will also learn here for the first time about France's secret war in Corsica, a war the U.S. media feels Americans "wouldn't be interested in." Full details of French counter-terror aid to Algeria are still under wraps, but readers will also gain some insights into this developing trouble spot.
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Intresting a book on french special forces!



posted on Aug, 17 2005 @ 08:59 PM
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The Operational Groups (OGs) are the "unsung heroes" of the OSS, and this story is about the Norwegian OGs, who operated deep behind enemy lines in France in 1944, and in Norway, China, and Indochina in 1945. OGs were the "Infantry of the OSS." They were uniformed military personnel designed as hard-hitting units trained to operate deep behind enemy lines to conduct sabotage upon Axis forces. The OGs were trained in parachuting, demolitions, weaponry, commando tactics, communications, amphibious warfare, and skiing.
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Looks pretty intresting!

A reissue of the 1952 translation published by Andrew Melrose Ltd. Vindicating the Italian navy in World War II, Borghese, an Italian naval commander, explains the numerous challenges presented to Italian seamen and their successes in spite of impediments, particularly in the Gondar and Scire operations. The author's comments reflect his nationalism, and this history of the Tenth Light Flotilla emphasizes the duty felt by the seamen involved as evidenced by diaries and letters


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Also intresting! Its about Italian Navy Seals in world war II!



posted on Aug, 18 2005 @ 12:10 PM
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This definitive history recounts the secretive operations and strategies of one of the world's most elite fighting forces. The Special Air Service (SAS) operated deep behind enemy lines, conducting surveillance at close range, poised to spring into action at a moment's notice. This Australian military classic tells the story of the formation of the military known to the Viet Cong as "phantoms of the jungle," its secret role in Borneo during confrontation with Indonesia, and its operations in Vietnam. After its involvement in Vietnam, the SAS formed a crack counter-terrorist force that saw action in Somalia, Kuwait, and East Timor and in the security of the 2000 Olympic Games.

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Wow this looks intresting ! Its 616 pages, I'm sure its full of tons of intresting facts about the Australian special air service.



posted on Aug, 18 2005 @ 12:37 PM
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From 1963 to 1966 Britain successfully waged a secret war to keep the Federation of Malaysia free from domination by Soekarno's Indonesia and by Chinese Communists. At the forefront of this campaign was the SAS, Special Air Service, an elite branch of the military whose essence is secrecy and whose tools are bold initiative, surprise, and high skill.

Working in four-man patrols, the SAS teams first made friends with the head-hunting border tribes and even trained some of them as an irregular military force. As the conflict continued, SAS teams went beyond the borders into Indonesia, where they tracked clown enemy camps, fired on supply mutes, staged ambushes, and attacked the soldiers in their riverboats.


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Defintly looks intresting! I've not heard that much about the SAS in Malaysia! 248 pages, I'm sure that will be an intresting read!



posted on Aug, 18 2005 @ 04:06 PM
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Royal marine comandos, Fleet Protection Group.

www.royal-navy.mod.uk...
en.wikipedia.org...




The Fleet Protection Group Royal Marines is the only operational Royal Marines unit outside 3 Commando Brigade. The Group works through the Commander Operations Fleet to the Commander-in-Chief Fleet, and is responsible for a wide range of tasks worldwide in support of the Royal Navy.


Tasks and roles:
Security of Nuclear Weapons,


The Group provides military support for the Final Denial of access to nuclear weapons in HM Naval Base Faslane, at the Royal Naval Armament Depot at Coulport and in transit. The duty squadron provides a number of Reaction Forces at various notices to move in order to support the static guarding undertaken by the Ministry of Defence Police



Joint Support Unit (JSU) Northwood ,


The Group provides a detachment for the physical security of key parts of the Northwood Headquarters, near London.



Fleet Standby Rifle Troop (FSRT).


The Group provides a number of teams to conduct tasks in support of the Royal Navy worldwide.




FPGRM is based at the HM Naval Base Clyde, which is situated near Helensburgh on the West Coast of Scotland. The Group is over 500 strong and is made up of 3 rifle squadrons (O, R and S) plus an HQ squadron


Not really classed as an "SF" unit by the MOD but I think they are.



posted on Aug, 18 2005 @ 05:26 PM
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Originally posted by devilwasp
Royal marine comandos, Fleet Protection Group.



The Fleet Protection Group Royal Marines is the only operational Royal Marines unit outside 3 Commando Brigade. The Group works through the Commander Operations Fleet to the Commander-in-Chief Fleet, and is responsible for a wide range of tasks worldwide in support of the Royal Navy.


Sounds like a British Red Cell to me, intresting find devil.



posted on Aug, 18 2005 @ 05:28 PM
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Known of the group for a while, was once called comanchio group but I didnt think it was sf.



posted on Aug, 18 2005 @ 05:32 PM
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Originally posted by devilwasp
Known of the group for a while, was once called comanchio group but I didnt think it was sf.


So did I, but they changed the name. I just noticed that they use to be called the comanchio group. Also I wonder if they did any ops, or exercises with Seal Team Six when Marcinko was around?



posted on Aug, 18 2005 @ 05:40 PM
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Red Cell was created to infiltrate supposedly heavily defend facilities and to send a message to the those to suppose to oversee the protection of the facilities the gaps in a dark humor way. this Brit unit is just to help defend the highly senstive facilities. i dont know if they got a Richard Marcinko in their ranks.



posted on Aug, 18 2005 @ 05:44 PM
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Originally posted by deltaboy
Red Cell was created to infiltrate supposedly heavily defend facilities and to send a message to the those to suppose to oversee the protection of the facilities the gaps in a dark humor way. this Brit unit is just to help defend the highly senstive facilities. i dont know if they got a Richard Marcinko in their ranks.

This group and SBS done that very task as well actually.
Did it at a nuclear power plant, I heard they got in and out with out being noticed and managed to steal I think it was codes or something..



posted on Aug, 18 2005 @ 05:49 PM
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Originally posted by deltaboy
Red Cell was created to infiltrate supposedly heavily defend facilities and to send a message to the those to suppose to oversee the protection of the facilities the gaps in a dark humor way. this Brit unit is just to help defend the highly senstive facilities. i dont know if they got a Richard Marcinko in their ranks.


I mean when they were called the comacchio group, they were formed somewhere around 1980, thats around when seal team six was created.



posted on Aug, 19 2005 @ 02:48 PM
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I find his opinion really interesting on special forces in Iraq! A good read!


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[edit on 19-8-2005 by blue cell]



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