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special forces profiles

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posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 04:19 PM
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Originally posted by blue cell





Nice, first time I see a P11 in actual service (and not some faked PR combat photos)

[edit on 27/7/2005 by Lonestar24]




posted on Aug, 1 2005 @ 01:10 PM
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Japan's Maritime Self-Defence Force (MSDF) plans to form its first naval special operations unit early next year. The Special Guard Force (SGF) will comprise 60 members organised in three platoons.

It is due to be established in March and will be based at Etajima, Hiroshima prefecture.

A Japanese Defence Agency spokesman refused to comment on whether the unit would receive training assistance from US Navy Sea-Air-Land special operations forces, as Jane's Defence Weekly sources have indicated. The SGF training programme is "secret", the spokesman said.

source


Wow I'm sure this unit will be in cooperation with South Koreas Naval Commando units. They have dealed with these threats alot. (note the threats I'm talking about are on the link.)



posted on Aug, 1 2005 @ 02:39 PM
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Wow the French actually look like they can fight, lol!!!!



posted on Aug, 2 2005 @ 10:33 AM
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This link tells about the famous battle of Tra Binh Dong, and the orgins of the marine corps martial arts program. Im just gonna tell you about the battle, because its to long to give a summary of.

On 14 February 1967, at approximately 2320, an enemy force approached the company’s perimeter from the west. A Marine in the observation post detected the movement and reported back to the 3d Platoon. Capt Jung quickly placed the company on alert. He waited until the platoon-sized unit closed to within 5 meters of the company’s perimeter before ordering his Marines to fire. Flares lit up the sky, revealing one corpse tangled in the wire and the remaining Vietnamese withdrawing to the tree line. Believing that the objective of this attack was to test the Marines’ defense, Capt Jung immediately prepared his company for the larger attack that would surely follow, assigning additional Marines to the listening posts, reapportioning ammunition, checking crew-served weapons, and reviewing fire support plans. Using the call sign “Seoul,” Capt Jung ordered his platoon commanders to remain vigilant throughout the night.


At 0410, approximately 2,400 North Vietnamese soldiers began their attack on the 11th Company with an intense barrage of mortar and recoilless rifle fire. One battalion advanced from the southeast, blowing whistles, beating drums, and screaming “Tai Han ra di, ra di” (come out Koreans) as they advanced on the 1st Platoon’s position. Two minutes later, two more battalions attacked from the north to the 3d Platoon’s sector. The Marines immediately responded with rifle and machinegun fire. Under attack from two directions, Capt Jung ordered the weapons platoon commander to direct fires from the company’s mortars and provide a situation report to the battalion commander, while telling the forward observer to begin coordinating artillery support from the brigade’s 105mm and 155mm batteries. Clad in a running shirt under his flak jacket, Capt Jung moved about the company’s perimeter, assessing the situation and encouraging his Marines. Despite the intensity of direct and indirect fire weapons and claymore mines, the North Vietnamese continued to advance upon the company’s position, attacking in human waves.



Newspaper headlines about the battle. All major Korean and English language papers, including the Chosun Ilbo, Dong-A Ilbo, Seoul Shinmun, Korea Herald, and Pacific Stars and Stripes, gave front page cover to accounts of the battle.
Photo courtesy of ROKMC Headquarters.
Rearmed and reequipped, the third wave of the assault attacked the 3d Platoon’s position and destroyed the protective wire with Bangalore torpedoes. Led by soldiers armed with rocket propelled grenades and flamethrowers, the North Vietnamese attempted to infiltrate a platoon into the breach at approximately 0422. SSgt Bae Jang Choon’s 1st Squad bore the brunt of the assault. Despite a serious wound to his right shoulder, SSgt Bae refused to abandon his position, ordering his Marines to stand their ground and prepare for hand-to-hand combat. The fighting shifted from rifles to grenades as North Vietnamese commanders continued to push soldiers into the breach. Entrenching tools, pix axes, and fists became the Marines’ weapons when the North Vietnamese entered the trenches.


In the face of an overwhelming and relentless enemy, the actions of the squad were characterized by tenacity and selflessness. PFC Kim Myoug Deok killed 10 enemy soldiers with his automatic rifle as they crawled toward his position. Despite serious injuries received from hand-to-hand combat, Sgt Lee Hak Won took handgrenades in both hands, waited for the enemy to draw near, and detonated the grenades in a suicide attack that killed himself and four Vietnamese soldiers. PFC Lee Young Bok, who was the only member of the squad not to have been killed or injured at this point, lured the enemy toward his position, disappeared into a spider hole, then released several grenades as the soldiers entered the trench, temporarily obstructing the attack.




intresting link


Wow if we only had them in Iraq, or do we? I mean they seem like they would be very good in the room clearance operations we often do. And with that ferocity, wow those guys are crazy!



posted on Aug, 3 2005 @ 04:45 AM
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This is like in kindergarten ....my daddy is stronger than Urs.....bla bla bla...
Of course is every country's spec.forces the best ...every one would say that. Some train their soldiers with beating others with shouting and others just by setting some high goals that demands high selfkontroll and just kicking people out of the force if they dont manage theese demands, without shouting and beatings.
The priority of the SF are never the same, U cant compare SBS with some afrikan paratroopers,what do they need a boot for ?
Every SF has it speciel thing its very good in then it maybe lacks on other things.
the only thing that could clear it are joint competions and dont worry they will not tell the results.



posted on Aug, 3 2005 @ 09:40 AM
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Originally posted by Locutus
This is like in kindergarten ....my daddy is stronger than Urs.....bla bla bla...
Of course is every country's spec.forces the best ...every one would say that. Some train their soldiers with beating others with shouting and others just by setting some high goals that demands high selfkontroll and just kicking people out of the force if they dont manage theese demands, without shouting and beatings.
The priority of the SF are never the same, U cant compare SBS with some afrikan paratroopers,what do they need a boot for ?
Every SF has it speciel thing its very good in then it maybe lacks on other things.
the only thing that could clear it are joint competions and dont worry they will not tell the results.



Dude this thread is not about that, please don't be an idiot.



posted on Aug, 3 2005 @ 06:31 PM
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Only pics I could find.



posted on Aug, 3 2005 @ 11:43 PM
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Ok first of all US Special Forces are trained in very small areas - there are jungle units, desert units mountain units etc. ---they cannot do everything!
While all special forces are extremely tough and determined men - there are several units throughout the world that have really distinguished themselves on the battlefield.

The first and foremost of these is the British SAS - these guys have been doing it tough since WWII. Dont forget these guys are responsible for training the israelis and the russians - especially the russian CT unit - Tiger Force - never heard of them?? im not surprised.

The main difference as i see it between the US Special Forces teams and units like the SAS is that the British strive to give their soldiers a thorough training in EVERY aspect of warfare - from jungle to desert, from parachute insertion to submarine insertion - from CT stuff like the israeli embassy takedown to undercover secret agent stuff like what we hear about happening in Northern Island - these guys can do it all - the british dont need Delta Force to do this, the SEALS to do this and the CIA SAS to do this - the SAS can do it all - now that is truly elite.

The British train their soldiers how to think, while the yanks train them what to think. This fundamental difference in training results in the British soldiers being free to use their initiative to overcome problems while the yanks are hesitant and often make mistakes - remember the israeli spy freeing the hostage?

This has prompted a major change in doctrine in the US Military and this is why many US Special Forces are now being cross trained with both the AUstralian and Bristish SAS.

THe Aussies are another unit that stands out as one of the best in the world - not only are they trained the same as the British - they possess a quality which cannot be found anywhere else in the world - the Aussie spirit. These guys are extremely capable men and can tackle any problem with a good attitude - what they lack in technology and numbers they more than make up for with their determination and dedication to their job. With Australias increased defence spending in recent years, i believe we will hear alot more about the Aussie SAS.



posted on Aug, 4 2005 @ 08:52 AM
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Originally posted by Private_parts
Ok first of all US Special Forces are trained in very small areas - there are jungle units, desert units mountain units etc. ---they cannot do everything!
While all special forces are extremely tough and determined men - there are several units throughout the world that have really distinguished themselves on the battlefield.

The first and foremost of these is the British SAS - these guys have been doing it tough since WWII. Dont forget these guys are responsible for training the israelis and the russians - especially the russian CT unit - Tiger Force - never heard of them?? im not surprised.

The main difference as i see it between the US Special Forces teams and units like the SAS is that the British strive to give their soldiers a thorough training in EVERY aspect of warfare - from jungle to desert, from parachute insertion to submarine insertion - from CT stuff like the israeli embassy takedown to undercover secret agent stuff like what we hear about happening in Northern Island - these guys can do it all - the british dont need Delta Force to do this, the SEALS to do this and the CIA SAS to do this - the SAS can do it all - now that is truly elite.

The British train their soldiers how to think, while the yanks train them what to think. This fundamental difference in training results in the British soldiers being free to use their initiative to overcome problems while the yanks are hesitant and often make mistakes - remember the israeli spy freeing the hostage?

This has prompted a major change in doctrine in the US Military and this is why many US Special Forces are now being cross trained with both the AUstralian and Bristish SAS.

THe Aussies are another unit that stands out as one of the best in the world - not only are they trained the same as the British - they possess a quality which cannot be found anywhere else in the world - the Aussie spirit. These guys are extremely capable men and can tackle any problem with a good attitude - what they lack in technology and numbers they more than make up for with their determination and dedication to their job. With Australias increased defence spending in recent years, i believe we will hear alot more about the Aussie SAS.




Intresting dude, but remember as I've said before this thread, is a thread full of all types of info about special forces. Its not a who's the best thread. Other wise, I completly agree with what you said, but remember its not all about training, it depends who the person is too. Their is good US Special Forces and good British , and German, and Indian, and so on.

[edit on 4-8-2005 by blue cell]



posted on Aug, 4 2005 @ 09:12 AM
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conducted by British SAS and Eighth Army Airborne between Ancona and Pescara, Italy, from 2 to 6 October, 1943. Total operational force comprised 61 men.

The object was to locate escaped POWs in the interior and muster them on beach locations for extraction. Begonia involved the interior parachute drop by four parties of Airborne and one party of 2 SAS. Jonquil entailed four seaborne beach parties from 2 SAS with the French SAS Squadron as protection.

Faults in planning and the omission of radios resulted in hundreds of POWs being located and forwarded to the beaches, but only 50 actually meeting with the beach parties and being evacuated.
source


Okay if you guys are wondering the operation was conducted in Italy. In least it was a little succesfull, okay basically I found a list of intresting SAS World War II missions. So I'm gonna post about the ones that are really intresting.

[edit on 4-8-2005 by blue cell]



posted on Aug, 4 2005 @ 09:20 AM
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During World War II, Operation Colossus was an experimental raid by thirty-eight of the five hundred men of No.2 Commando, who trained as Britain’s first paratroops in 1940.Maj. T. Pritchard commanded and among his men were three interpreters, one an Italian national who was formerly a waiter at the Savoy Hotel, London.The objective was to blow-up a fresh water aqueduct near Calitri in southern Italy, where it spanned the Tragano gorge. It was not a major military target, though it did supply some two million people including the ports of Bari and Brindisi and the naval base of Taranto. The object was primarily a test to see if the RAF could deliver men accurately to an enemy target, and the men could achieve their objective by air drop and exfiltrate themselves afterwardsOn 10 February 1941, all but one of the six Whitley bombers dropped their men between 50 to 250 metres of the target. The sixth, suffering navigational problems, dropped its men and unfortunately much of the mission's explosives, two hours late and two miles north. On examining the aqueduct it was found the structure was of concrete and not brick as intelligence advised. All heavy explosives available were packed around one of the side piers and anything remaining to a small nearby bridge over the Ginestra stream, to hamper repairs, (though an officer later stated that “just for the hell of it” was part of the equation).

Both detonations were successful and the Commandos set about making their way overland to the mouth of the River Sele, some 50 marching miles away on the Mediterranean coast south of Salerno
source


About 36 hours later they got captured, you can read about on the link. But wow intresting mission, I have to say those guys sure did have a lot of determination.



posted on Aug, 4 2005 @ 09:33 AM
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During World War II, Operation Tombola was a major Special Air Service raid on German rear areas in Italy.

Fifty men parachuted in near Bologna on 23 March 1945, under command of Major Roy Farran. A number of air drops provided weapons for the rag-tag force which armed local resistance fighters and linked up with seventy escaped Russians.

They were able to attack German 51 Corps headquarters, based at two villas in the Tuscan Apennines; cut roads and shell a number of installations. Just as important as the 600 or so Germans killed and 400 captured was the number of defenders taken from other duties to secure the rear area.
Operation Tombola


Wow thats pretty amazing, 600 killed and they only had like 120 people. Plus they captured 400, and I don't think any of their number was killed.



posted on Aug, 5 2005 @ 10:50 AM
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Commando training lasts twelve months for candidates who are already on active duty, or fourteen months for candidates taken in as civilians. Commando training consists of a preparatory training of, four to twelve weeks respectively, the Basic Commando Training (ECO) of fourteen weeks and the Advanced Commando Training (VCO) of twenty-six weeks. The main objective of commando training is to acquire individual basic skills. In addition, each commando learns to bring these skills in to practice as a team

Prepartory training

Preparatory training of three months can be compared with basic military training that is given to all servicemen: the only difference is the „commando touch" that goes with it. The basic teaching package ranges from weapon training, military first aid, physical training and sports, marches, lessons in hygiene and precautionary medical care, military law, basic information, Army ethics and organization theory. At the beginning of the third month servicemen from Royal Netherlands Army and the Marine Corps join the training.


Advanced Commando Training


This final stage of twenty-six weeks is geared to the operational missions of the commandos the skills and drills that go with it. Regular parts of the training are, team vehicle driver's training, "Combat Life Saver", free fall parachute training, field services "Direct Action" and "Urban Terrain". During the last ten weeks each commando is additionally trained to become a sniper, a medic, a communication specialist and/or a demolition specialist irrespective of his specialisation.


Missions

To prepare and conduct all conceivable operations from the full range of Special Operations.

To participate simultaneously in two peacekeeping operations with a maximum of four teams each.

To be self-reliant in combat service support and administration.

To act as Doctrine Centre for Special Operations.

To provide internal and external training
source


Really intresting site, I'll try and find more on them when I can. But there's way more info than I gave, on the site. Check it out!



posted on Aug, 8 2005 @ 03:38 PM
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Those were the only pics I was able to find.



posted on Aug, 8 2005 @ 03:46 PM
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We are now able to offer a totally unique opportunity to experience the secret world of the UK's Special Forces, under the guidance of leading experts.
In collaboration with former SAS instructors we have created two awesome Team Building events, each of which gives a close insight into Special Forces techniques and tactics. These are without question the most exciting, inspiring and motivational Team Building events yet devised.
Event One reflects the now famous SAS operation that rescued the hostages from the Iranian Embassy in 1980. From relative obscurity the SAS was suddenly catapulted into the world of celebrity. Created around the techniques used in this famous hostage rescue, our Team Building event was featured recently on the BBC's 'Money Programme' under the title "The Motivators", where it received excellent reviews.
Please click on the picture left to go to the page.
Event Two is a multi-skills event, where you experience and learn some of the techniques that make the SAS man such a formidable opponent in any conflict.
A Close Quarter Battle course and sniper skills are just two.
source

Sounds pretty cool, has anybody on this board gone through this course? Here is another link. Wow sounds pretty cool. Cost a hell of a lot of money though.



posted on Aug, 9 2005 @ 10:22 AM
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I thought it was quite well known that the American armed forces aren't that well trained. For instance the basic British soldier is trained to the standard of U.S Delta Force. Personally, I think S.A.S is the best.

I wrote an article on them here



posted on Aug, 9 2005 @ 11:50 AM
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Originally posted by mashup
I thought it was quite well known that the American armed forces aren't that well trained. For instance the basic British soldier is trained to the standard of U.S Delta Force. Personally, I think S.A.S is the best.

I wrote an article on them here


Dude remember its not about who's the best, its just a thread full of info on special forces units.



posted on Aug, 9 2005 @ 12:26 PM
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Originally posted by mashup
I thought it was quite well known that the American armed forces aren't that well trained. For instance the basic British soldier is trained to the standard of U.S Delta Force. Personally, I think S.A.S is the best.

I wrote an article on them here


LOL, you have to be on drugs or incredibly stupid. Anyway, anyone who knows anything, wouldn't give the above comment the time of day.
Anyway, I just had to reprimand that incredible stupid sentence. Idiot.



posted on Aug, 9 2005 @ 12:30 PM
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I think a bit of pride is getting in the way here.
British soldiers are trained harder and longer, there are many reasons but for one thing the british need the men and women to be a bit good at everything.
The US doesnt need this, it has men and women for specific roles and therefore do VERY well in those roles but wont do so well in other roles.
This is just an opinion ofcourse, feel free to flame it or denouce it but just my opinion.



posted on Aug, 9 2005 @ 12:54 PM
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Training continues after your "official" training. For example, a U.S. infantryman's training doesn't stop after his actual training. He continues training and learning new things when he gets to his unit.

To say that the standard British soldier is trained to the U.S. Delta Force is beyond stupid. Seriously, are you on drugs or something, mashup?

And U.S. forces "not that well-trained?" Where on Earth do you get that idea? The U.S. forces and the British forces are THE BEST trained forces in the world. I do not know why people assume the U.S. forces are lousy-trained, but just have large numbers. Large numbers means nothing for modern wars, and the U.S.'s strategy has never been using large numbers to accomplish something. The whole idea of the Abrams tank and the Apache helicopter and so forth was so the U.S. could do more with less to fight WW3 with the Soviets, who had huge numbers of tanks and troops.

Right now, the U.S. military is probably the best it has ever been, with the most highly-trained troops in its history. The military is smaller right now, meaning more strain is put onto the U.S. troops, so like the British, U.S. troops must learn a heck of a lot too. Army training has been revised to include much more training, and Navy training is following suit.

There is a war going on right now, so it is the real deal for the U.S. military, and the British military. The training is actually being utilized and they are learning a LOT of things in Iraq that they did not previously know. This combat experience is good for both armies and gives them a leg up on knowledge with respect to other armies.

As for who has the best special operations force, there is no one. The United States has the special operations forces with the most varied capabilities and the largest budget, but no individual spec ops force is the best.

The U.S. Delta Force is based off of the British SAS. The SAS, the U.S. Army Special Forces, etc...all work together and train each other in certain skills. The Army SF trains the SAS in certain things, the SAS trains the Army SF in certain things. A German force (GSG9?) is based off of the U.S. Army Special Forces I know, not sure which one.

I know a Special Forces soldier who has worked with the special operations forces of many countries and he said they all highly respect each other and all are very good at what they do. He has worked with Korean, British, German, etc...special operations forces, as well as the many different U.S. military special operations forces.

[edit on 9-8-2005 by EngineMan2145]




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