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Do you have to carry ID, License, insurance, documents, blah?

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posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 03:39 PM
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originally posted by: grainofsand

Wow!? The land of the free considers driving a vehicle as a privilege?!


It does and it has been that way for some time.


...so you are happy with "show me your papers or I'll arrest your ass" type situations?


Where did I say that? I just explained the rather typical outcome if you are pulled over without a license.




posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 03:42 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

So what are your personal thoughts about "Show me your papers or I'll arrest your ass" type situations then?
I think that ids totalitarian, and I'm surprised US folk appear to view it as normal, or okay.



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 03:45 PM
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originally posted by: grainofsand
So what's the deal in your country or US state folks?
I don't have to carry any ID in the UK, even as a car driver.


If you are performing a licensed function, driving a car is one, you must have the correct ID on you whilst performing that function.

If NOT, then the police cannot require you to present any sort of ID, at any time. They will occasionally say that you do, but it is a lie. What you cannot do, however, is state you don't have any on you when you do.

In some US states, the ones with valid "stop and identify" laws, you have to give "pedigree information" if asked. If not in a "stop and identify" state, you do not. Again, the cop will often try to act like you do, but as a supreme court justice once said, "They are free to ask you. You are free to ignore them". What you cannot do, is lie to them about your name or SSN. If you're in a non-s&i state and choose not to identify, you can smile, say "I do not choose to enter into a voluntary conversation with a law enforcement officer at this time. Am I free to go?" (words per a federal judge recently) and see where it goes from there. In some cases, it will infuriate them to the point they start making up crap to arrest you for, and in the US, they come equipped with arbitrarily defined punitive charges called "mopery laws" that they can resort to in order to punish you for your impudence, if they're not being recorded.

AFAIK, all states require you to provide pedigree information if you are arrested.

It should be noted that a surprising number of LEOs in non-s&i states, especially local LEOs, do not understand that you cannot be compelled to identify during a Terry stop. That's what started the whole thing off when Hiibel refused to identify during a Terry. It was later ruled that Nevada's 'must identify' statute was actually legal in scope. Many others have been ruled not to be. At present, it's about 50/50.

But no stop and identify statute can require papers, other than for licensed functions.



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 03:45 PM
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originally posted by: grainofsand
So what are your personal thoughts about "Show me your papers or I'll arrest your ass" type situations then?


Unless there is reasonable suspicions that I have committed a crime I do not have to show my 'papers' to anyone.



I think that ids totalitarian, and I'm surprised US folk appear to view it as normal, or okay.


I typically only carry my license when I am driving or flying, it has no other purpose for me.



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 03:46 PM
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My 87 year-old brother-in-law was mowing the yard the other day when he ran out of gas for his mower. Not thinking about anything except getting the job done, he hopped in the car and motored to the nearest station, about half a mile from his home. Trouble came when he didn't fasten his seat belt and the minute he pulled out of the station to head home he saw blue lights behind him.
He hadn't taken time to pick up his wallet because he knew he had some loose cash in the car. Even though he had his registration and his insurance papers he was still written up for not having his lD in possession and not wearing a seat belt. He must appear in court in a month and present his license despite the fact that it was in the system. The city will get $25 dollars for his failure to wear a seat belt and the state will get $72.70 for court costs even if the judge doesn't fine him for not carrying his license---if things go as usual in that court.



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 03:47 PM
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Texas. Here you need to have you Drivers License and proof of insurance. They check registration by running the tag. They run you also to check for wants.

I got stopped and it turned out my DL was expired. I didn't get a renewal notice and it's good for 6 years. Easy to forget about the date. I only had to pay $10 office fee after proving a renewal.

Walking around, a person doesn't have to have ID. But police like to know who you are and if you need to be arrested,



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 03:48 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
Unless there is reasonable suspicions that I have committed a crime I do not have to show my 'papers' to anyone.

From everything I've read so far just not carrying 'papers' is a crime in the US?
True or not?

There is no requirement to carry any papers at all while driving a car in the UK.
Can you say the same for where you live?



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 03:52 PM
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originally posted by: diggindirt
My 87 year-old brother-in-law was mowing the yard the other day when he ran out of gas for his mower. Not thinking about anything except getting the job done, he hopped in the car and motored to the nearest station, about half a mile from his home. Trouble came when he didn't fasten his seat belt and the minute he pulled out of the station to head home he saw blue lights behind him.
He hadn't taken time to pick up his wallet because he knew he had some loose cash in the car. Even though he had his registration and his insurance papers he was still written up for not having his lD in possession and not wearing a seat belt. He must appear in court in a month and present his license despite the fact that it was in the system. The city will get $25 dollars for his failure to wear a seat belt and the state will get $72.70 for court costs even if the judge doesn't fine him for not carrying his license---if things go as usual in that court.
So it is a crime in the US to drive without carrying 'your papers' then?
...anyone got a straight answer about this?

I'll be straight about the UK, we are not required to carry any documents to legally drive a privately used vehicle.



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 03:52 PM
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originally posted by: grainofsand

From everything I've read so far just not carrying 'papers' is a crime in the US?
True or not?


You do not need to carry ID at all times.


There is no requirement to carry any papers at all while driving a car in the UK.
Can you say the same for where you live?


No, but I do not have an issue with it.



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 03:58 PM
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US west coast: In public, you must have a current valid ID on you at all times and present to any 'peace' officer upon request.

They always ask for it when talking to you for whatever reason, its the second thing they say after , "how ya doin"?

"Got any ID?"

If you don't have one on you, they may take you downtown to confirm your identity, depending on what you have been 'stopped' for.

Then again if you can sort of prove who you are by voucher from others or some other form of "ID", they might just issue a 'fixit' ticket, giving some time to acquire or renew and a court date to show the judge you have one, now. There will be no charge or fine.

This is my old school experience, may have updated since.



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 03:58 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

That's better, the law requires you to carry ID while driving but you are happy with the law.
Different conversation regarding if you have an issue of course, but good to clarify the difference between the UK and US.



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 04:00 PM
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Driving is not considered a right and a license and insurance is required so a person is expected to have it on them. I don't know the rules in all states but I doubt there is much difference. I figure just have, show it and not get a ticket and have to go to court and prove it. Otherwise it's time and money to waste.



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 04:01 PM
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originally posted by: reldra

originally posted by: stosh64
To be honest I don't know what the actual law is, I have been driving since 1981.

I never gave it a second thought when I got pulled over, I just figured it is what you do, License, registration and insurance.

I never heard anyone protest this procedure until recently, and I still don't see what the big deal is to be honest.

I have always been VERY polite to police, it was just the way I was raised. And for myself it has never failed me. I just do not understand the people who get belligerent and are anything but cooperative.

It is ALWAYS a major FAIL to test their authority.

Having said that, after all we have seen posted in the last couple years I will NOT EVER call the police for assistance unless it is for an ambulance and my wife or son is dying. I avoid police at ALL costs now.

But when an encounter is out of my control, ea; traffic stop, I am a very humble, cooperative citizen.

I do wish I had a surveillance camera at all times to keep everyone honest.

Hope I wasn't to off topic OP.


You are playing it safe and that is perfectly normal. There are others who test the constitution, and we are allowed to, like the people you see on youtube testing checkpoints and such.


Agreed, and I fully support their freedom to question authority, and exercise their Constitutional rights.. Especially in instances like you mentioned of unwarranted 'checkpoints'. I have never been in that circumstance of being checked, just blind luck I guess, and I guess I am unsure how I would react.

I have just never understood why people have to test the limits when it is a lose, lose situation. Maybe it is just my age showing, I think I just grew up in a different mindset than many people.
I know this sounds crazy, but I always trusted the police. Now....not so much.....

It is nice to see another WNYorker on the boards, there are a couple others on here too.
I am in Sanborn. If you don't mind me asking are you in Buffalo? I understand if you don't want to share. I was just curious.
Anyway, hi neighbor



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 04:02 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

Wow that really does seem to be a police state.
I haven't carried ID 'as the norm' in the UK for decades.
We are not required or have been conditioned to do so.



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 04:02 PM
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a reply to: roadgravel

Conditioned to conform then?



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 04:06 PM
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I have never been asked for an ID by police except during traffic stops. i suppose I don't fit a profile.



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 04:09 PM
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a reply to: roadgravel

But still you meekly conform?
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 04:10 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
US west coast: In public, you must have a current valid ID on you at all times and present to any 'peace' officer upon request.

They always ask for it when talking to you for whatever reason, its the second thing they say after , "how ya doin"?

"Got any ID?"

If you don't have one on you, they may take you downtown to confirm your identity, depending on what you have been 'stopped' for.

Then again if you can sort of prove who you are by voucher from others or some other form of "ID", they might just issue a 'fixit' ticket, giving some time to acquire or renew and a court date to show the judge you have one, now. There will be no charge or fine.

This is my old school experience, may have updated since.


Wow, thats quite frightning.

The idea of ever needing to provide ID to a policeman is something which has never entered my mind .... Makes me realise how very different Britain is.



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 04:10 PM
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originally posted by: grainofsand
a reply to: roadgravel

Conditioned to conform then?


Traffic tickets are a big revenue. As mentioned, a person must be able to prove they are allowed to drive.

in some cities police like to check pedestrians out, looking for warrants, etc. ID then might be a draw back.

I don't feel i have been conditioned but I could be misleading myself.



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 04:14 PM
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originally posted by: AndyMayhew

originally posted by: intrptr
US west coast: In public, you must have a current valid ID on you at all times and present to any 'peace' officer upon request.

They always ask for it when talking to you for whatever reason, its the second thing they say after , "how ya doin"?

"Got any ID?"

If you don't have one on you, they may take you downtown to confirm your identity, depending on what you have been 'stopped' for.

Then again if you can sort of prove who you are by voucher from others or some other form of "ID", they might just issue a 'fixit' ticket, giving some time to acquire or renew and a court date to show the judge you have one, now. There will be no charge or fine.

This is my old school experience, may have updated since.


Wow, thats quite frightning.

The idea of ever needing to provide ID to a policeman is something which has never entered my mind .... Makes me realise how very different Britain is.
Same here, I'm shocked with the privilege comments, and the obvious thing that carrying ID to be allowed to drive a car is normal to some US folk.
Land of the free eh? lol



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