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I Might Have Found a Stony meteorite?

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posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 12:58 AM
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While out hiking recently in the nearby Cascade mountains, I came across an interesting looking rock. I'll be honest with you...it's shape and pits stopped me, but the way it felt in my hand is what compelled me to keep it. I'm not too sure what made me think it could be a meteorite (other than the look) but something about it made me carry it the seven miles out...in addition to the 35lb pack already on my back!

That was a couple of weeks ago...and I had totally forgot about it until I found it in my pack tonight. In spite of my 'intuition', I was quite surprised and happy to discover that it was magnetic! Now...I know that this by no means makes this an absolute. I also did the 'streak' test on ceramic, to eliminate a couple of other magnetic rocks, and it passed that...meaning, it did NOT leave a streak.

I don't have acid to do the nickel test and I don't think I have a strong enough file to do a cross cut to look for metallic flakes. Short of trying to find someone local to look at it, I figured I'd throw up some pictures here to let you guys mull it over and maybe suggest some other tests?

It is just over six inches long and 4.5 inches wide. I would estimate it to be around 2-3 lbs. It doesn't really have a smell.

here are some photos:










edit on 21-7-2015 by westcoast because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 01:04 AM
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If you can file off just a tiny bit and look for little spherical formations inside that is a good indicator it formed in zero-g. You might have the real deal, I have always wanted to find one.



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 01:19 AM
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there doesnt appear to be a fusion crust. with the quality of pics it appears to be sandstone or limestone judging it by the eroded surface, try a acid test to see if it fizzs.



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 01:24 AM
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a reply to: suicideeddie

If I'm not mistaken, limestone or sandstone would not be magnetic, would it? Plus, this is heavy and strong...not at all soft.
edit on 21-7-2015 by westcoast because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 01:28 AM
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a reply to: bananashooter

Okay, I used the file built into my pocket knife and rubbed off a corner. It looks like there are some flecks in there, and they reflect the light.








posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 01:43 AM
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This is a close-up of the 'underside', or what would appear to be the inside of whatever the piece broke off of. You can see some metal flecks here.




posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 01:52 AM
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Can't really tell. The ones I have seen have pretty distinctive spheres in them. Not to say all of em look like that. I know that not all magnetic rocks are meteorites, and not all meteorites are magnetic. I am going to say it's probably iron rich earth formed rock.



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 02:02 AM
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I found a website that suggested using a multimeter to check its resistance (in OHMS) That a meteorite would have a low resistance (below 100) where a naturally occurring chondrite would be high.

SO....my husband got his meter out and we had fun sticking the prongs in a few of the small holes on the underside...and it worked! It measured between 7 and 18 ohms.

I don't know if that means anything conclusive....but interesting.



edit on 21-7-2015 by westcoast because: (no reason given)

edit on 21-7-2015 by westcoast because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 02:07 AM
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If it IS a meteor, there's something to avoid:




posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 02:25 AM
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I believe there are several Universities in the Pacific northwest. Perhaps the astronomy or geology department at one of them would be of assistance. As I understand it, someone who has seen a number of meteorites would be a good hands on judge of what is and isn't one.

Probably better than asking people on ATS to identify one from an image.

edit on 7/21/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 02:59 AM
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a reply to: westcoast

hi - just my opinion - but as i am not an expert [ just a hobbyist ] it looks very sinilar to ironstone

wikki primer article

can you research the prescise geology of the region you found it in ???

cos obviously being a sedimentary deposit - if my suspicions are corredct the area should have an ironstone stata running through it

thus ends my opinion - i have only ever seen metoeorites that were on display and labled or handed to me " hey look at this cool metoerite fragment "

and as others have said - its a lot easier to ID things that you are holding than looking at photos and reading your descriptions

though PS - atleast you did gibe us pics with a scale and multiple views and your descritions are clear and concise - S&F



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 05:10 AM
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a reply to: westcoast

Looks like a Hanford blob
to me.
You might want to perform
a surgical scrub on your
soul.



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 05:51 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
I believe there are several Universities in the Pacific northwest. Perhaps the astronomy or geology department at one of them would be of assistance. As I understand it, someone who has seen a number of meteorites would be a good hands on judge of what is and isn't one.

Probably better than asking people on ATS to identify one from an image.


yup thats the best way and get a second opinion, some of the samples i have collected ahve been id as natruals or iron slag in one place and then classified in another



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 06:02 AM
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cool find

My money is on it is a meteorite.

Check out this site.

link

..it had a few matching characteristics

It looks kinda like it has chondrules, like from this sitelink




posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 08:47 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
I believe there are several Universities in the Pacific northwest. Perhaps the astronomy or geology department at one of them would be of assistance. As I understand it, someone who has seen a number of meteorites would be a good hands on judge of what is and isn't one.

Probably better than asking people on ATS to identify one from an image.



Yup! I have Western Washington to the North and The University of Washington to the South....and I have some contacts. I'm just a very impatient person.
(summer break, and all)

Honestly, I didn't want to be embarrassed when I went to them...but I haven't been laughed at yet, so I will give them a try.



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 08:51 AM
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a reply to: westcoast

I used to have a tektite that looked like that. It might be a nice find.



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 02:39 PM
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Can you do a test at home on something like this to know if it's a meteorite ?



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 04:24 PM
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The only way to get a definitive result is to have it done by a professional , recognized lab.

I have used these people a few times. Totally professional.

New England Meteoritical Society


Regular Service - $ 20.00, testing within 10 to 14 days, sample(s) returned by First Class US Mail with your report. Up to three samples may be submitted for the $20.00 Regular Service testing cost.



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 11:18 PM
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originally posted by: Mandroid7
cool find

My money is on it is a meteorite.

Check out this site.

link

..it had a few matching characteristics

It looks kinda like it has chondrules, like from this sitelink



Ha! That's the site I was already using....Great minds, and all that.



posted on Jul, 22 2015 @ 10:01 PM
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a reply to: westcoast

My main concern would be the size/appearance of the piece - While I do agree that to my eyes, it does appear to have the shape of a meteorite, it almost appears to be too rough - I'd expect with the temperatures, a chunk like that would have a partially melted crust (fusion crust). Now, if it's been there a while, maybe some weathering would cause it to appear like that.

Because I'm not an expert, I can't say for sure if it is a meteorite, so the best case would be to send it in. If it's classified as one, a chunk like that could be worth a pretty penny (more than I can afford, at least).

If you want the amateur route - Give this link a try: It'll take you to about 200 photos of non-meteorites and possible meteorites (more or less a photo gallery with comments on each picture).

Good Luck! I'd hope for it being the real deal. At least being magnetic reduces the types of rock it could be.

-foss




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