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The Scum of Self-Checkouts

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posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 07:43 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Well you say that, but there are stores running with three empty human checkouts, and three active self checkouts, and then you have to go and find the member of staff in order to get checked out when those are either full, or when you are a person who requires that an individual check your goods out for you as a matter of political protest, and worker solidarity.

That is not appropriate. There should always be a human being available to a customer, otherwise customer service collapses. I will not accept that. It is not appropriate to the retail trade, and I am vehmently opposed to the spread of this technology through the retail world.




posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 07:54 AM
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a reply to: pl3bscheese

Maybe you just need a reminder of what REAL problems are.




First world: It took 3 minutes instead of one minute, I'm going to explode.

Maybe you really need to re-think your priorities.



posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 07:57 AM
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all I know is that can't stand the jerks who think none of the rules apply to them because they're special somehow and use the express lane where it's 15 items or less and they have 90 items.

those people deserve all the contempt I can muster.

wonder what else they think they are self important for like stop signs. I hate the a holes that can't take the time to at least do a rolling stop at a stop sign but instead just tear right through them.

bicyclists too. what with them thinking no laws apply to them. drive on the wrong side of the street no noproblem. tear ass through red lights and stop signs cause your ridding a bike to get in shape but too lazy to stop when required to do so by law for their own and others safety. no problems right.

but mainly I can't stand the express lane cheaters. what/whom else do they try and weasel and cheat through out any given day.



posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 12:14 PM
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a reply to: stosh64

Your post represents part of the problem actually. OP is likely aware that a rude person at a self-checkout line is well below the priority of people in abject poverty. You are the one placing said priority for pbl when you know nothing of OP's mindset. Yes...it is indeed true that poverty, famine, disease, war, genocide are more important but THIS IS A RANT and the great deal of the rant was about disrespect to others.

Point is, OP made a rant...in the rant forum...where it was pointed out that the problem is partially selfish from the get go. On the other hand, people continue to ignore the fact that OP appears to be more concerned over the rude and disrespectful behavior displayed by people. It's an example of what is wrong with this me, me, me attitude we've accepted in society where nobody else matters and only my needs are relevant or important.

But again...this is a rant forum...when pbl made a rant


edit on 20-7-2015 by KyoZero because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 12:29 PM
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a reply to: pl3bscheese

Why does it seem that the most incompetent, low-IQ people try to use the self-checkout? It's like a challenge, do they enjoy putting their minds to the test?

Standing in line to use the self-check out is a microcosm for the world at large. You see people confused as hell, stumbling to use the most basic of technology. Even with verbal prompts and clear diagrams on the screen of what to do, people seem to somehow get stuck. When these people inevitably get suck, they freeze like a statute and shut down.

The world is very much the same way. We have nearly 7 billion people stumbling around, trying to get through life without any help despite quite a few resources on the subject of life available. When these people get stuck in life, they freeze and shut down.

If you like to people watch, the self-checkout is the place to be. Self-checkout's are a godsend to people with mental disorders and social phobias. I know a few people with won't shop at a brick and mortar store unless it has a self check out. For these friends, dealing with a strange human is unbearable. God forbid these people get the: PLEASE PLACE THE ITEM IN THE BAGGING AREA. PLEASE NOTIFY ATTENDANT FOR HELP. I've seen people straight up run off when the computer spouts that line off.

What's curious is that the self-checkuot at the stores near me are usually dead. Right next to them are long lines of people waiting to have a live human scan their items for them. How lazy are we people? Do you all not see the open scanners right there? Why are you choosing to stand in line for 15 minutes when you could just scan your 10 items yourself?!

People have a herd mentality and if they see a line, they probably naturally go to it. "Well, there's a line so this must be the place to be..."
edit on 20-7-2015 by MystikMushroom because: (no reason given)


(post by nonspecific removed for a serious terms and conditions violation)

posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 01:10 PM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

Wow, I could have wrote that post. That's pretty well what I experienced, and how I see it. Think I'll stick to the starbucks and deli cashiers from now on unless the self-checkout is ready to roll. This kinda applies to a lesson I learned when I started up a new business earlier this year. I tried to be a nice guy, offering far below my competition. That's a very bad move. I learned the hard way, and ended up consulting a friend who told me what happened. You tend to attract the lowest common denominator when offering "free" or much cheaper packages compared to the competition. The norm will see a red flag in the lowered price, and all the abnormal will come your way. Somehow, that seems to apply here. The herd will go with the conventional, and all the weirdos will tend towards experiencing the unconventional. Unfortunately, most of those weirdos are off in the not so good kinda way.I even see this with my choice of women. There's gotta be a good in between. I guess starbucks/deli it is.
edit on 20-7-2015 by pl3bscheese because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 01:43 PM
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a reply to: pl3bscheese

What you describe is Apple's approach to sales.

They aren't the cheapest, and they don't pretend or want to be. Hence, you don't see the lowest denominators of society using their products.



posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 02:05 PM
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Now that's a blended approach. Exotic. Unconventional with high standards. I need to apply this across the board in my life right now. Thanks.



posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 02:15 PM
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a reply to: pl3bscheese

It's all about perspective and perception.

You could sell a glass of boxed wine to a customer for $20 (when it cost you fifty cents) -- as long as you marketed it to them as some fancy, high-end wine. You could have a little fake story written about the vineyard from which it came, and how it was lovingly made by a on old blind man on a small, family vineyard in the South of France. And you know what? People would rant and rave about how good the cheap boxed wine was.

People already want to believe things, all you as a businessman have to do is nudge them a little and give them permission to believe what they already want to believe. We're taught from the age we can understand the concept of money that more money = better stuff. So if something costs more, it has to be better.

Perception really is reality.
edit on 20-7-2015 by MystikMushroom because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 02:22 PM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

In the world of business, perception is reality, cause business is all about manipulation, but I do hold to their being an objective reality, even if we can only experience it to a given degree of clarity.

I'll never con on business like that, but I will try my next project 5% under the average competition, with a superior product in the similar line, banking on volume in the long run and reputation to carry me through the red ink. You can go exotic and exuberant pricing if you're an established exotic brand, else bring innovation to the table. If you're simply tinkering and a half-step ahead, maybe is best to go the volume route.



posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 02:53 PM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

It's funny you mention that. There are all those little anecdotes out there of veteran "wine tasters" who can describe the palette, nose, and heaviness...only to be duped into buying a 12 dollar Apothica when they were soooooooo sure it was a $250 so and so



posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 03:27 PM
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a reply to: KyoZero

My dad is in his 50s and tends to do the opposite. He gets the cheapest things and tries to convince himself that it's still decent quality. I see him going through multiples of a product that would still be working on it's first go if he just spent 20% more for a solid product. My brother tends to go for the most expensive, thinking it's somehow always the best. I'm the weirdo who checks consumer reports, researches the company a bit, then dabbles with products in the middle of the range until I find a good buy that matches my needs.



posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 04:13 PM
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originally posted by: pl3bscheese
a reply to: KyoZero

My dad is in his 50s and tends to do the opposite. He gets the cheapest things and tries to convince himself that it's still decent quality. I see him going through multiples of a product that would still be working on it's first go if he just spent 20% more for a solid product. My brother tends to go for the most expensive, thinking it's somehow always the best. I'm the weirdo who checks consumer reports, researches the company a bit, then dabbles with products in the middle of the range until I find a good buy that matches my needs.


See, I'm kinda 50/50 on that. Some things I will pay more money for and get better quality, which in turn lasts longer, but you have to purchase carefully (like reviews, which I use, and consumer reports, which I don't, unless it's something seriously expensive that I want to last a long time, like a car, washing machine, etc). Just because something is expensive doesn't mean it's good quality (like the name brand craze with so many things that are so overly expensive you're paying for name recognition and not quality). On the other hand, sometimes it's best to buy cheap, like t-shirts, undies, or something you know you will replace periodically, etc.

As far as wine, I LOVE wine,and I drink a LOT of it. There is nothing wrong with a good $12 import. Anything cheaper than 10, especially those "bargain" wines that are around $5 are crap. Period. A good $25-50 bottle for special occasions, but 12 is a good medium price range.



posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 04:21 PM
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a reply to: Liquesence

Oh for sure, some things require little thought and are good to go as cheap as can be. The quality of items in general has increased over the years. I really don't care for anything but the cheapest when we're talking socks, briefs, t-shirts, a deck of cards, pencils... I mean I getcha, this is more prosumer type market items I'm mentioning.

I've found wine to be the exact same. The cheapest are horrible, but you can often find some excellent taste in the lower of the middle range. It's a bit hit or miss, but as long as you follow ratings you'll at least be assured to skip the worst.



posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 04:26 PM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

Exactly. And interesting you should mention that about the boxed wine and about brand perception (and price).

I've noticed that oftentimes companies, when developing names for certain products that are supposedly exotic, or imported, will give them names that sound like it came from that place or region. Take Oikos (greek) yogurt. Even pasta, (domestically made) asian cuisine, (domestically made) mexican cuisine, frozen Italian foods, etc. It's little things like that and the connotations it gives the consumer, and it's almost an unconscious association in our brains.

How many times when shopping for an item do we seemingly pick the one that our brain associates with the region or culture of the product, rather than what might be the *best* product? I'm just as guilty, sometimes. If you're wanting greek yogurt you'll likely picking something with a Greek sounding name even if it was NOT made in Greece, versus something that has a domestic name.

Hence the clever trickiness of marketing.



posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 04:56 PM
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a reply to: pl3bscheese

Oh God, and now even Amazon is hard to do that with.

I'm finding little slips in my orders from Amazon sellers wanting me to give awesome reviews for free crap. You can't trust Amazon reviews anymore, even if they say "verified purchase" because they could be trumped up reviews.

So, my purchases take twice as long as I have to read each review very carefully noting similarities between reviews. It took me almost 3 months to settle on a headset for my PS4! I eventually went with the Sony brand because it wasn't the best, wasn't the worst, and the price seemed to justify the quality.



posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 04:58 PM
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a reply to: Liquesence

I've noticed that as well -- people seem to think "oooh foreign, it must be better!"

Actually, Safeway used to have their own generic branded pizzas that were actually made in Italy. They were the Safeway Select "Firewood Baked" line or something. They were cheap, but DAMN good. The ingredient list was maybe 6-7 things, all recognizable.

I commented to my girl after we had one, "You know, I actually feel like I ate real food..."

To bad they discontinued the line



posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 05:57 PM
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originally posted by: TrueBrit
a reply to: ketsuko

Well you say that, but there are stores running with three empty human checkouts, and three active self checkouts, and then you have to go and find the member of staff in order to get checked out when those are either full, or when you are a person who requires that an individual check your goods out for you as a matter of political protest, and worker solidarity.

That is not appropriate. There should always be a human being available to a customer, otherwise customer service collapses. I will not accept that. It is not appropriate to the retail trade, and I am vehmently opposed to the spread of this technology through the retail world.


Maybe it's just that we've shifted our habits to those places that have maintained a proper customer service balance despite the presence of a few self-checks in our midst. If I can't get rung up and out the door quickly and easily because there's no one around to see to it one way or another, I'm not shopping there. This is just one of the many, many reasons it's a cold day in hell before I darken Walmart's door.

The grocery stores I visit always have plenty of human checkers on hand in addition to the few self-checks. They also do a good job of quickly assessing when a glut of shoppers are coming and calling for backup checkers in a hurry. It's a rare day when we stand in line for longer than a few minutes at the grocery.

I think it's a matter of the company and what they do to value the customer.



posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 05:59 PM
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a reply to: Liquesence

I don't know. I buy a decent amount of cheap wine in the little 8 oz bottle four packs. They're perfect for cooking.




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