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Radishes, radishes, everywhere!

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posted on Jul, 18 2015 @ 03:16 PM
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a reply to: Unity_99

Mmm, potato salad is one of the only places I would naturally think to eat radishes.




posted on Jul, 18 2015 @ 03:21 PM
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originally posted by: Night Star

originally posted by: Silcone Synapse

originally posted by: Atsbhct
a reply to: Night Star

As I found out when I was giving them away...most people share your hatred of radishes.



Damn them...Radish racists!
They are awesome and good for you.


Ahahahaha! I've been called many things in my life, but a radish racist? LOL That cracked me up!

You want to see people make weird faces, give someone a radish if they've never tried it before!


That is very true-I gave a my nephew his first radish when he was two and his face was priceless.
He looked genuinely horrified.
Not to everyones tastes I suppose,but I love them.



posted on Jul, 18 2015 @ 03:39 PM
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I can't grow radishes here, the plant always turns into a small tree and produces all kinds of seeds. but no radishes.

Tried many different types of seeds and many locations here but always the same result. Same with rutabagga and turnip, but I do get good turnip greens.



posted on Jul, 18 2015 @ 03:42 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

That is the strangest thing! You could always sell the seeds?



posted on Jul, 18 2015 @ 03:58 PM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
a reply to: rickymouse

That is the strangest thing! You could always sell the seeds?



I thought about that. The seeds come up and grow more radish trees. My tomato plants get twelve feet long, the potatoes usually get about eight feet long and the pea vines are too thin and won't climb the poles.



posted on Jul, 18 2015 @ 04:27 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

The issue could be that it's too hot? How hot is it on average where you are...during growing season?



posted on Jul, 18 2015 @ 04:29 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

Another issue you might be facing is over fertilized soil. If the leaves are too fertilized, they'll put al kinds of effort into growing vines and leaves, and never have enough juice to bear fruit.



posted on Jul, 18 2015 @ 05:09 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse
You can eat the seed pods when they're young and tender. They have the same radish flavor and more actual nutrition (so I'm told) than the radishes.
My radish crop (heirloom purple) bolted early this year---as a result of my planting them too thickly because I wasn't sure of germination and an early heatwave---so we got very few radishes but tons of blooms (which the hummingbirds love) and a lot of seed pods.



posted on Jul, 18 2015 @ 06:07 PM
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We love radishes, too!!

Have you tried to saute them?
They're pretty good that way....I used radish, small potato...cut into sticks and added onion.



posted on Jul, 18 2015 @ 06:47 PM
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a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

I have never! Sounds like it might make a nice addition to breakfast.



posted on Jul, 18 2015 @ 09:22 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

Goes nicely with scrambled eggs.....or use some cheese for an omelet.



posted on Jul, 19 2015 @ 02:54 AM
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I like radishes also... I will post a website link for some benefits of Radishes. The comments at the foot of the link page are worth a browse. Take care all..

www.fullcircle.com...



posted on Jul, 19 2015 @ 10:02 AM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
a reply to: rickymouse

Another issue you might be facing is over fertilized soil. If the leaves are too fertilized, they'll put al kinds of effort into growing vines and leaves, and never have enough juice to bear fruit.



I live on a hill with plenty of clay in the soils, built up from deteriorating leaves. This means that the soil is very rich but this does not explain why my radishes I put in planters full of cheap store bought soils do the same thing. I can't grow all kinds of stuff here. There could be a lot of nitrogen in the soil and also in the air from all the big pine trees, that is a possibility. The soils are acidic and I have to add lime to neutralize them. The acidity usually comes from nitrogen compounds.



posted on Jul, 19 2015 @ 10:06 AM
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originally posted by: diggindirt
a reply to: rickymouse
You can eat the seed pods when they're young and tender. They have the same radish flavor and more actual nutrition (so I'm told) than the radishes.
My radish crop (heirloom purple) bolted early this year---as a result of my planting them too thickly because I wasn't sure of germination and an early heatwave---so we got very few radishes but tons of blooms (which the hummingbirds love) and a lot of seed pods.


Thanks for that information.

A little fawn was eating my radish plants about two weeks ago, I don't know why it targeted the radishes. It pulled many of them out when eating the leaves. Maybe seperating them more might help, I put them around a half inch apart when planting maybe I should go an inch apart.



posted on Jul, 19 2015 @ 11:30 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

You mean you aren't planting them in sandy soil? Well there is your problem.



posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 12:25 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse
Yeah, they need some space and very loose soil. You probably won't have a bolting-from-heat issue in your area.

My deer prefer beets and spinach with an occasional nip of onions and Swiss chard. But I have found that if I plant the beets to be making greens at this time of year, when blackberries are ripe, the deer don't bother them so much because they're full of blackberries.



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