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Living the Moment

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posted on Jul, 17 2015 @ 06:17 PM
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Distractions exist all around us.

And life manifests fully only for those who look beyond those idle amusements.

Tarapoto is a modest-sized city of ramshackle shanties built from corrugated steel. With buildings clustered close together and high-rises of dubious construction, ascendent it spreads atop a little slice of the Peruvian Amazon.

There the people navigate that sprawling city on motorbike or within tiny cars. And for those who venture beyond its confines towards the green jungle-wrought mountains in the distance, danger awaits.

For there, landslides from those rocky mountains lay scattered across the street. Boulders larger than cars rest flush upon the highway, and streams flowing down the hillsides go flooding across the road.

About forty-five minutes beyond Tarapoto exists a small fishing village whose name I've never heard. There the people greet you with smiles and waves then immediately start brokering their wares.

There I once saw a shrewd girl who studied abroad in spain barter a river fish for a chicken.

There I once sat in a plastic chair while watching wild boars go gallivanting down the street.

Disembarking from the port in a motorized canoe, my friend and I were headed downstream along the mighty Huallaga River towards the tiny village of Llucayanacu. For there existed the shamanic center to which we traveled.

The Huallaga is broad, brown, muddied, and vast. Jungle envelopes both its distant shores, interspersed with random small villages where stray dogs wander and people wile away the days fishing hard whilst oft-waving at gringo strangers. The Tarapoto area is known as the cloud mountain region of Peru because fluffy pillows of billowing white cling tight unto those jungle-green peaks.

And it was watching those peaks that I learned an important lesson.

Sitting in the middle of that canoe I balanced precariously as it rocked fore and aft. And there, surrounded with splendor, I caught my friend rife in distraction whilst obsessing over his phone.

And that made me think. Tapping him on the shoulder, I returned him unto the moment. Then I reminded him swift, "Dude, look around you. Right now you're in a canoe rafting down the Amazon basin. If someone asks what you did last week, there are a ton of answers just as good as that...but there aren't many better."

My friend put down his phone. He gazed out across that vast river, that immense jungle, those amazing mountains.

And equally, together, we both enjoyed that ride.

Ever since I've found myself seeking those kinds of magical moments where the splendor of life overwhelms you and you feel amazingly grateful to be alive.

They're always there. They're perpetually around.

But they can only happen once you put aside all distractions.

Put down the phone, put away the tablet PC, pack up the computer and return unto the moment.

Reality around you is vast, immense, impressive, and gorgeous.

The world becomes an amazing place when only you start living in the moment.


edit on 17-7-2015 by Trachel because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 17 2015 @ 06:55 PM
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a reply to: Trachel
There is one problem; and that is with distractions we live with, more manifest everyday. To live in the 'now moment' is to be completely aware of ones existence within ones environment FOCUSED on every thought or action and carry these out with a genuine (purity of) purpose. It gets messy with multitasking as anything one does; that original thought form is diluted and without pure focus of/to that form becomes negligible; similar to self pleasuring.



posted on Jul, 17 2015 @ 07:11 PM
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a reply to: Trachel

What ?! This is non-sense. The goal of existence is to worry, about bills, about life in general, just worry. To jump from worry to worry is the real essence of existence. Without worry we would never have built this magnificent human society in which YOU live. And you talk about a bunch of useless trees and a patch of water ? Everyone knows what trees are and water is only good for the toilet, man ! We've got electrolytes, man !



posted on Jul, 17 2015 @ 07:27 PM
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a reply to: gosseyn

Love this post.

The sarcasm didn't bleed through for a few lines in, and before I caught it my eyes almost bugged out of my head.

Well played, sir. Well played.



posted on Jul, 17 2015 @ 08:09 PM
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originally posted by: gosseyn
a reply to: Trachel

What ?! This is non-sense. The goal of existence is to worry, about bills, about life in general, just worry. To jump from worry to worry is the real essence of existence. Without worry we would never have built this magnificent human society in which YOU live. And you talk about a bunch of useless trees and a patch of water ? Everyone knows what trees are and water is only good for the toilet, man ! We've got electrolytes, man !

Worry about life in general so much so you forget about a potential afterlife (TOO BUSY PAYING THE MORTGAGE); that other place promised if you just believe something or other. Trees grow to make houses. Water is consumed to eventually be flushed into waste management systems.



posted on Jul, 17 2015 @ 08:10 PM
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a reply to: Trachel

I have experienced magical moments that took place in almost hyper-realistic sensations: watching my 6 year old son boat his first King, listening to my daughter perform a jazz number to perfection, and sharing a sunset with my wife of 25 years. All noises fade, movements relegated to back ground scenery, your entire being focused on the moment. The emotions generated by these moments never dull, in fact they return in full force during recollections, and at times, bring great solace to turbulent times.

You are correct--perfect, magical moments are the result of focused awareness, and the ability to put all distractions on hold.



posted on Jul, 18 2015 @ 05:59 AM
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Last year a friend and I took a flight to New Mexico, rented an SUV and began our voyage exploring the Four Corners region. We visited a couple museums in ABQ and a few landmarks before setting off (way out of our way) north to Denver. I wanted to visit a couple friends and of course a few boutique shops before traveling back south. Before leaving DEN we decided to check out the Cliff Dwellings in Pueblo, Co. I had asked my friends if they wanted to join us to which they agreed. They had two kids so we decided to all squeeze in our rental instead of taking two vehicles.

The drive was roughly 1.5hrs if I remember correctly and it was quite an unusual drive. Within that short timeframe we experienced all four season. First it was warm and sunny driving with the windows down but clouds were ahead of us. I remember having a thought about the energy I felt around me, specifically the hairs on my arm. Within minutes it began to hail, hard, and as we drove down the highway we see a biker getting pelted with ice. I look back at my friends and my buddy just nodded so I pulled over, kicked it in reverse and got close to the biker. My buddy ran out, opened the back hatch and waved the biker over. For obvious reasons he was eternally grateful and within 10-15 minutes the hail turned to snow, than to rain. As soon as the storm came it was over and the biker thanked us, left and we continued are journey.

After having explored the Cliff Dwelling for a spell we got towards the end where some children were playing in one of the rooms. This room had a wooden ladder that went up to the second floor dwelling that also went out to a balcony (not bad for some savages). These two children one about the age of 5 the other barely pushing 3 were inside the downstairs room, the mother aloof outside of the building. The older boy climbs the ladder so the little girl follows suit. Needless to say having children of my own this bothered me. I didn't overreact just simply taking note.

A few minutes later I see the boy climbing down the ladder and thought to myself "thats a relief", when suddenly I see the little girls feet dangling from the other side of the opening where the ladder is not. Than I see her chins, than knees and by the time I saw her thighs I recognized at this point even if she realized theres no ladder it'd be too late for her to be able to pull herself back up. I walk over and grab her from below and lower her down to safety. After we left my friend says, "you know you probably saved her life right? and she looked at you like it was the most natural thing". Personally, I couldn't help but remark that had I not stopped for the biker I wouldn't have been at the spot at that time to help.

That next evening we had travelled back south and had explored a few Anasazi sited and rented a room in Aztec. That night we stopped at a bar and somehow I got into a conversation with a retired trucker. He used to truck fracking waste and felt like sharing. He was going on about how it (the waste) should be used for fertilizer and my brain was exploding. My friend thought it was weird that I was evening entertaining the discussion and wondered why I "didn't cut him down a peg" (her words). I just simply smiled and listened for awhile.

A little later a biker comes in only not your typical biker, he was Dine or Navajo. Strangely enough this biker knew him well and introduced me to him. The trucker leaves and I have a conversation with the Navajo. Turns out he was going through a really tough time and very depressed I noticed. It appears he was doing some soul searching that day and had gone to his tribes solstice festival only he called it something else. Apparently he knew nothing about his ancestors and was completely out of touch which is why he found it so remarkable that he would meet me on that day. For he had consumed his life trying to obtain a "white mans" world and here I am a "white man" trying to get in touch with his world. He left there with a new perspective and felt it was his ancestors that brought me to him and if I were to ever return he would introduce me to his elders.

When you begin a journey from the soul and not consumed with worry, its amazing the experiences you can have.



posted on Jul, 18 2015 @ 07:33 PM
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a reply to: Rosinitiate
Rosicrucian initiate; you did this with no fear or trepidation, just dove into the experience? These things (road trips) and the resulting positive outcomes only happen when in blind trust. I have to mention the Griswald family:' National Lampoon Vacation' (a less than positive visit to Wally-world) because all family members were in chaos and not feeling "SPARKY/Clark's" dream of a perfect vacation. You were entirely open to anything happening and were rewarded with something I would call a profound metaphysical change (enlightenment). My grandfather; in order to attain one of the masonic degrees was given a model T ford and no money to the purpose of driving from Arizona to NYC as a beggar for food/gas/loggings (not allowed to visit temples or attain help from fellow members). He did it by trading labor and doing good works for those he ran across in this quest.
edit on 18-7-2015 by vethumanbeing because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 19 2015 @ 05:02 AM
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originally posted by: vethumanbeing
a reply to: Rosinitiate
Rosicrucian initiate; you did this with no fear or trepidation, just dove into the experience?


There was no fear just rabid curiousity. Just prior to the trip marked the conclusion of an 11 year career so I had some free time you can say. Originally the plan was a road trip to Snake Mound in Ohio and before we knew it we were on a plane. We didn't bother with lodging until we knew where'd we be, that said the both of us worked in the travel industry so we were aware of what we could and couldn't do and we had a tent with us anyway.

One of the better experiences I've had not including the birth of my children.



posted on Jul, 19 2015 @ 08:25 AM
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a reply to: Rosinitiate

Crazy adventure, thanks for sharing!

Planning any other epic quests soon?



posted on Jul, 19 2015 @ 07:40 PM
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originally posted by: Rosinitiate

originally posted by: vethumanbeing
a reply to: Rosinitiate
Rosicrucian initiate; you did this with no fear or trepidation, just dove into the experience?


There was no fear just rabid curiousity. Just prior to the trip marked the conclusion of an 11 year career so I had some free time you can say. Originally the plan was a road trip to Snake Mound in Ohio and before we knew it we were on a plane. We didn't bother with lodging until we knew where'd we be, that said the both of us worked in the travel industry so we were aware of what we could and couldn't do and we had a tent with us anyway.

One of the better experiences I've had not including the birth of my children.

So, no fear. No expectations just a result that moved your soul forward to another [growth] place. Awesome that you included your family in this potentially dangerous activity (they had no clue).

edit on 19-7-2015 by vethumanbeing because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 19 2015 @ 08:05 PM
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a reply to: Trachel




And it was watching those peaks that I learned an important lesson. Sitting in the middle of that canoe I balanced precariously as it rocked fore and aft. And there, surrounded with splendor, I caught my friend rife in distraction whilst obsessing over his phone. And that made me think. Tapping him on the shoulder, I returned him unto the moment. Then I reminded him swift, "Dude, look around you. Right now you're in a canoe rafting down the Amazon basin. If someone asks what you did last week, there are a ton of answers just as good as that...but there aren't many better." My friend put down his phone. He gazed out across that vast river, that immense jungle, those amazing mountains. And equally, together, we both enjoyed that ride.


Trachel, a S&F for this thread. It immediately made me think of this quote:

"Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."
(not sure who to attribute it to as there are differences of opinion as to whom stated it first)


Many times I've watched parents desperately working their iPhones to record junior performing some feat, when they could be actually experiencing the moment with their own eyes. What did people do before these contraptions came to be? I bristle when I see people spend more time looking down at a screen then up at the world around them.

Proud owner of a "flip phone" and won't trade it for nothing.

Namaste,
YogaGinns

edit on 19-7-2015 by YogaGinns because: to add quote



posted on Jul, 19 2015 @ 08:17 PM
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a reply to: YogaGinns

Thanks YogaGinns.

Yeah it's super depressing that people would rather see things through the eyes of tech than with their own vision.

I mean, 4k resolution is amazing and all... but real life has it beat.



posted on Jul, 19 2015 @ 08:24 PM
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a reply to: Trachel

if you are hungry eat, if you are tired sleep. You are not an ant

Camelot is gone, and its ideals are dead. Long live to new tomorrow
edit on 19-7-2015 by temuddjin because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 19 2015 @ 10:07 PM
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originally posted by: Trachel
a reply to: YogaGinns

Thanks YogaGinns.

Yeah it's super depressing that people would rather see things through the eyes of tech than with their own vision.

I mean, 4k resolution is amazing and all... but real life has it beat.

This experience is not "real" (it is a virtual simulation by others) you volunteered to participate within; years ago as a human lab rat. One of the reasons for?: to figure it out/your existence the reason for and why within one lifetime. Seems you are failing.
edit on 19-7-2015 by vethumanbeing because: (no reason given)




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