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video.. cop face plants handcuffed teenage girl

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posted on Jul, 17 2015 @ 07:01 PM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6

well you can just use the youtube option and play it at 0.5 speed .. she still hit the floor realy hard




posted on Jul, 18 2015 @ 02:40 AM
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a reply to: bobs_uruncle



. He needs to go to jail for felony assault


Yes and if he feels man enough, perhaps he ccould try the same trick to immates in prison.



posted on Jul, 18 2015 @ 03:42 AM
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Bodyslamming cuffed women now are they?
Waiting for Slapmonkey to show up and condone the behaviour of these officers, because the women were "resisting arrest".



posted on Jul, 18 2015 @ 04:04 AM
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a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

I clearly don't support this officer's actions.

That said, I think most (not all) situations like this are a result from an officer letting the job get to them.

I can say that I have experienced a few situations in my ten year career in which I almost snapped like the officer in the video (thank God I didn't). I can also say with 100% certainty that it was due to stress from the job. The horrible things I saw, the horrible people I had dealt with, the horrible ways in which they treated me, all came to a head on those occasions. The stress got to me and I almost lashed out. On one of the occasions I left work early. I used sick time for the remainder of my day. I used it as a time to cool off.

Now, I don't write this to excuse an officer's actions in situations like this. I am just saying that I don't think most of these situations are a result of low IQ, steroid use, militarization, or some grand conspiracy to enslave US citizens. I think in most of these situations we are seeing human beings succumbing to high levels of stress.

The problem is, many officers don't recognize when, or don't want to believe they have reached what I refer to as their "career boiling point." A time in which an officer can no longer do the job without the possibility of "snapping."

I personally feel that when that point is reached, an officer should do everything in their power to make a change. That change may be attending counseling, a lateral transfer to a less stressful position within the police department, or even leaving the career.

*For those that wish to hear my personal story*

I remember when I reached my career boiling point like it was yesterday. As a school resource officer I was handling an ongoing situation between two high school aged girls that were impregnated by the same guy. To make a long story short, the girls harassed each other equally on a daily basis. In person and on Facebook. Their adult mothers came to the school on multiple occasions trying to start fights. They also participated in Facebook harassment.

One Saturday (when I was off duty), one of the adult mothers drove her daughter to the others house. They all brought knives to fight. Some people were hurt, but luckily nothing serious. All declined to press charges against one another.

On Monday when the families returned, I called them to my office for yet another counseling session. This time I was verbally attacked by the mothers and their daughters. I was called a POS, racist, "cracka" cop that didn't care about helping them. One, must remember nobody was EVER physically harmed on school property, the area in which I was responsible for.

I remember the rage that woke inside of me. I swear, all of the dead bodies, the rapes, the domestic abuse, the lying, the yelling, and all of the times in which I was verbally attacked flashed through my head. Just as I was about to "snap," I walked out of my office. I thought to myself thank God these were all women, because if not it very well may have gotten physical.

I then asked myself what happened? How did I get to this point? The person I was becoming was not me. At that time, I was 29 years old. I had always been a calm, rational, understanding, and patient person. Hell, I have Buddha tattooed on my arm. I don't use drugs, don't smoke, and barely drink. So what changed me? It was at that point that I realized it was the stress from the job.

Three years ago I realized I reached my "career boiling point." Last year I made a change. I am slowly returning to the normal me. If I didn't realize a change was necessary, I very well may have been on one of these Youtube videos. Not because I am a monster, not because I am a bad person, simply because I am a human and I can break.

Again, not excusing this officer's actions, but maybe he didn't realize he had reached his "career boiling point." Hopefully, more officers can realize when it's time to hang up their belts.

*Sorry for straying off topic OP*


edit on 18-7-2015 by TorqueyThePig because: (no reason given)

edit on 18-7-2015 by TorqueyThePig because: (no reason given)

edit on 18-7-2015 by TorqueyThePig because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 18 2015 @ 04:43 AM
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a reply to: TorqueyThePig

Thank you for taking the time to explain this ..... and what you say makes a lot of sense,it doesn't make sense that there is some grand conspiracy to enslave the population through out of control police officers...i am still on the fence when i comes to steroid abuse as it can easily add to the high levels of stress law enforcement have to deal with on a daily basis...well not add to it but perhaps exacerbate the problem.....

Clearly you have gained some valuable insight in you years on the job.....if only there was a system in place to help officers from reaching boiling point so that these kind of incidents can be minimized in the future ...



posted on Jul, 18 2015 @ 04:51 AM
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This happened in my city, and it's being talked about. The cop in question, is still a cop. The incident was already reviewed by local "officials" and no charges were made against the cop in question. This actually happened a little while ago, but it's becoming viral now. My own opinion is that this cop was wrong. This girl was clearly exessively beaten. She was no match for the tough guy.


I hope some real justice can come out of this one.



posted on Jul, 18 2015 @ 05:01 AM
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originally posted by: Wookiep
I hope some real justice can come out of this one.


It won't. And the reason it won't is multi-faceted:

1) apathy
2) short attention spans
3) systematic conflicts of interest
4) corruption
5) institutional failures in dealing with problems
6) lack of sufficient, appropriate feedback
7) meme/fable as regards the underlying issues

If you could fix one or two of these, you could possibly get a handle on it. But change won't happen until that occurs.



posted on Jul, 18 2015 @ 05:03 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

You're probably right. Sad. :/



posted on Jul, 18 2015 @ 03:13 PM
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a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

Thank you for the kind response.

I value your opinion and know there is truth to it.

In my ten years I have come across only one officer that may have used steroids. Of course, I have no proof, but it seems likely. That said, there have been no known incidents of him over reacting. There is no question that "roid rage" is a real side effect. However, I still think it is a minimal occurrence in law enforcement.

I think a real way to mitigate issues like this is to create a PROACTIVE system to recognize when an officer is encroaching on their "career boiling point." Most agencies do have employment assistance programs (EAP) and mandatory counseling sessions after tragic incidents. I have had to attend two in my career. Once when I responded to an apartment explosion in which an infant and her father were killed, and once when I almost fell to my death after a suicidal man tried to pull me over an 8 story balcony railing as I grabbed him.

The only issue is those programs are reactive. We cannot afford to be reactive when it comes to the mental health of police officers. I would love to see weekly counseling sessions by on staff psychologists to deal with the daily stressors that we face in law enforcement.


edit on 18-7-2015 by TorqueyThePig because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 18 2015 @ 04:45 PM
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Fight with the cops and you get what you deserve.



posted on Jul, 19 2015 @ 06:42 AM
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originally posted by: Wookiep
This happened in my city, and it's being talked about. The cop in question, is still a cop. The incident was already reviewed by local "officials" and no charges were made against the cop in question. This actually happened a little while ago, but it's becoming viral now. My own opinion is that this cop was wrong. This girl was clearly exessively beaten. She was no match for the tough guy.


I hope some real justice can come out of this one.



Fired and jailed. That is the only satisfactory outcome for an incident such as this.



posted on Jul, 19 2015 @ 07:51 AM
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a reply to: alienjuggalo

What a complete and utter Coward and total POS this cop is.

I just don't know what to say about this,almost speechless.

If he manages to keep his job then there is something seriously very wrong with the police force in America.




(post by greydaze removed for a manners violation)

posted on Jul, 19 2015 @ 11:18 AM
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a reply to: TorqueyThePig

You're a good man Torquey, Your input is helpful too. Im wondering if once an officer reaches that point and seeks help within the organization is there a stigma attached or any kind?..I could see that as being an impediment to seeking help, maybe outside the organization is more comfortable?



posted on Jul, 19 2015 @ 09:22 PM
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a reply to: vonclod

I made it well known that I wasn't happy. I don't recall receiving any flack for it.

I wasn't suicidal, I was just on the cusp of a nervous breakdown.

That said, I cannot speak for every agency, or every officer.

An outside organization may make things better.



posted on Jul, 19 2015 @ 09:35 PM
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a reply to: TorqueyThePig

Your welcome




The only issue is those programs are reactive. We cannot afford to be reactive when it comes to the mental health of police officers. I would love to see weekly counseling sessions by on staff psychologists to deal with the daily stressors that we face in law enforcement.



That sounds like a great idea,i would imagine though it would be a massive undertaking,but would most certainly help to identify officers whom are at breaking point and put in place some kind of de-stress program (for lack of better wording)......



posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 12:32 AM
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a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

Yeah it would be a difficult undertaking. Perhaps that's why it hasn't been done yet.

I was thinking some kind of mandatory bi-weekly debriefings with an actual counselor.

Of course the issue would be making something like that mandatory, and cost.

Honestly, I don't know what the answer is.


edit on 20-7-2015 by TorqueyThePig because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2015 @ 10:55 PM
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I just rewatched this.
I paid more attention to how the officer slammed her ass down into the chair.
Watch the slow motion and notice how much impact drives up her spine and into her skull.
She may have been stunned goofy when she stuck her foot out in an act of primal self defense.
It should also be pointed out that he gave her a wrist strike to the throat before he slammed her grill into the concrete.
edit on 21-7-2015 by skunkape23 because: (no reason given)



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