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did texas cops hang sandra bland in her cell?

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posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 04:02 PM
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a reply to: Rocker2013

Would you advise you own daughter to talk back to cops like that?




posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 04:03 PM
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originally posted by: MoreBeer

originally posted by: concerned190

originally posted by: MoreBeer
a reply to: blackthorne

Nope.

She probably didn't want to lose her new job and suffer the embarrassment of her horrible behavior.


How was her behavior horrible? The cop had her ticket ready to be signes, he had no right to make her leave her vehicle as he citation was already taken care of, I hope people find him and beat his ass. I wouldn't have put my cig out either, your vehicle is an extention of your home. You do not even need a permit to have a firearm in your vehicle because it is an extention of your home.


Well at least you have an example of how not to act if you want to keep smoking your cig in your car during a police stop.

Certain segments of the population think they do not have to listen to authority and that laws do not apply to them.

Civilized people don't act that way.


By saying no. All she said was she didn't have to and she is right. I don't see how that gives him the right to arrest her. What crime had she commited? Smoking may kill but it's not a crime.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 04:03 PM
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a reply to: Rocker2013

Of course, I'm not a right winger.

Shocking I know.

Just someone who is feed up with criminals being put on a pedestal and looked at as some kind of martyrs.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 04:04 PM
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originally posted by: MoreBeer
a reply to: Rocker2013

Of course, I'm not a right winger.

Shocking I know.

Just someone who is feed up with criminals being put on a pedestal and looked at as some kind of martyrs.


What was her crime?



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 04:06 PM
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originally posted by: MoreBeer
a reply to: Rocker2013

Of course, I'm not a right winger.

Shocking I know.

Just someone who is feed up with criminals being put on a pedestal and looked at as some kind of martyrs.



She didn't commit a crime, she failed to signal, and was about to get her ticket. HE decided to start crap. But I forgot he's a cop, above the law and so he can do whatever he wants.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 04:07 PM
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a reply to: concerned190

You’re entirely missing the point


The cop’s actions are indefensible. But people have to act rational just because there are cops who will kill you out there


That’s the point.

Get away from the incident as peaceful as possible and you won't end up in jail or hurt


Can you people understand that


She may have been in the right

WHAT GOOD DOES IT DO HER NOW?


edit on 23-7-2015 by Willtell because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 04:09 PM
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Most legal analysts believe the officer handed the situation wrong. There wasn't reason to do what he did. Take the signed warning and let her go.
edit on 7/23/2015 by roadgravel because: typo



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 04:11 PM
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originally posted by: concerned190

originally posted by: MoreBeer
a reply to: Rocker2013

Of course, I'm not a right winger.

Shocking I know.

Just someone who is feed up with criminals being put on a pedestal and looked at as some kind of martyrs.


What was her crime?


resisting a lawful order

resisting arrest

assault on a police officer

If she would not have acted like a child she could have driven away, fought the ticket in court is she wanted, and filed charges against the officer. Some people will never learn.
edit on 23-7-2015 by MoreBeer because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 04:14 PM
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originally posted by: MoreBeer

originally posted by: concerned190

originally posted by: MoreBeer
a reply to: Rocker2013

Of course, I'm not a right winger.

Shocking I know.

Just someone who is feed up with criminals being put on a pedestal and looked at as some kind of martyrs.


What was her crime?


resisting a lawful order

resisting arrest

assault on a police officer


Baloney. There was no lawful order given. THe officer/department may assert that it was lawful...but it wasn't.

Her arrest was illegal.

Her assault was self defense.

So again...what crime was she performing that led to her arrest?



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 04:16 PM
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a reply to: MoreBeer

There was no assault. He f*cking made that kick up.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 04:16 PM
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She had to have commited a crime FIRST in order for his "lawful order" to be credible.
He had no reason to start to arrest her. There was no crime commited.
edit on 7/23/2015 by concerned190 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 04:19 PM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan

originally posted by: MoreBeer

originally posted by: concerned190

originally posted by: MoreBeer
a reply to: Rocker2013

Of course, I'm not a right winger.

Shocking I know.

Just someone who is feed up with criminals being put on a pedestal and looked at as some kind of martyrs.


What was her crime?


resisting a lawful order

resisting arrest

assault on a police officer


Baloney. There was no lawful order given. THe officer/department may assert that it was lawful...but it wasn't.

Her arrest was illegal.

Her assault was self defense.

So again...what crime was she performing that led to her arrest?


Her arrest was legal.

The officer felt threatened and ordered her to leave her vehicle. Whether he was right or wrong she needs to listen to that order.

She'll never get to fight those charges because of the way she acted and the choices she made.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 04:19 PM
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a reply to: MoreBeer

There was no lawful order. The officer's exact words: "You mind putting out your cigarette, please, if you don't mind?"

He gave her the option to put the cigarette out or not by saying "if you don't mind". Well, she did mind and let him know it. It was only then that things went for the worse. Her only crime was failure to signal a lane change. His job was to issue a citation and be on his way.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 04:20 PM
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originally posted by: MoreBeer

resisting a lawful order



In a traffic stop, is it legal for an officer to order a driver to put out a cigarette and exit the car?

Ms. Bland has a right to smoke in her car, but Trooper Encinia could argue that the cigarette was interfering with legitimate police business. Since he had already processed the papers, however, “I don’t see a good reason,” said Robert Weisberg, a criminal procedure expert and law professor at Stanford University.

During a traffic stop, a police officer has the right to ask a driver to get out of the car even for a non-arrestable offense, as a way of securing his own safety. The officer has almost complete discretion and the driver is legally obligated to get out when asked. “He has control over the location of drivers,” Mr. Weisberg said. “It is equal to an officer patting you down to see if you have a gun.”

In this case, Mr. Weisberg said, there is no evidence that Trooper Encinia feared for his safety. He would have to argue that Ms. Bland’s refusal to put the cigarette out gave him the impression that she was violent. If Trooper Encinia had feared for his safety, he would not have walked away from the car for five minutes, Mr. Weisberg said.

Link


Whether or not it was lawful is certainly up for debate.
edit on 23-7-2015 by mOjOm because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 04:22 PM
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originally posted by: mOjOm

originally posted by: MoreBeer

resisting a lawful order



In a traffic stop, is it legal for an officer to order a driver to put out a cigarette and exit the car?

Ms. Bland has a right to smoke in her car, but Trooper Encinia could argue that the cigarette was interfering with legitimate police business. Since he had already processed the papers, however, “I don’t see a good reason,” said Robert Weisberg, a criminal procedure expert and law professor at Stanford University.

During a traffic stop, a police officer has the right to ask a driver to get out of the car even for a non-arrestable offense, as a way of securing his own safety. The officer has almost complete discretion and the driver is legally obligated to get out when asked. “He has control over the location of drivers,” Mr. Weisberg said. “It is equal to an officer patting you down to see if you have a gun.”

In this case, Mr. Weisberg said, there is no evidence that Trooper Encinia feared for his safety. He would have to argue that Ms. Bland’s refusal to put the cigarette out gave him the impression that she was violent. If Trooper Encinia had feared for his safety, he would not have walked away from the car for five minutes, Mr. Weisberg said.

Link


Whether or not it was lawful is certainly up for debate.


Yep fully agree but she will never get to fight any of the charges because of the way she acted.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 04:25 PM
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originally posted by: MoreBeer

originally posted by: mOjOm

originally posted by: MoreBeer

resisting a lawful order



In a traffic stop, is it legal for an officer to order a driver to put out a cigarette and exit the car?

Ms. Bland has a right to smoke in her car, but Trooper Encinia could argue that the cigarette was interfering with legitimate police business. Since he had already processed the papers, however, “I don’t see a good reason,” said Robert Weisberg, a criminal procedure expert and law professor at Stanford University.

During a traffic stop, a police officer has the right to ask a driver to get out of the car even for a non-arrestable offense, as a way of securing his own safety. The officer has almost complete discretion and the driver is legally obligated to get out when asked. “He has control over the location of drivers,” Mr. Weisberg said. “It is equal to an officer patting you down to see if you have a gun.”

In this case, Mr. Weisberg said, there is no evidence that Trooper Encinia feared for his safety. He would have to argue that Ms. Bland’s refusal to put the cigarette out gave him the impression that she was violent. If Trooper Encinia had feared for his safety, he would not have walked away from the car for five minutes, Mr. Weisberg said.

Link


Whether or not it was lawful is certainly up for debate.


Yep fully agree but she will never get to fight any of the charges because of the way she acted.


Let's all just bow down to the cops and the government. Let's not any of us act in disagreeable manner. Well all be safe then. Thank you big brother.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 04:28 PM
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originally posted by: MoreBeer

originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan

originally posted by: MoreBeer

originally posted by: concerned190

originally posted by: MoreBeer
a reply to: Rocker2013

Of course, I'm not a right winger.

Shocking I know.

Just someone who is feed up with criminals being put on a pedestal and looked at as some kind of martyrs.


What was her crime?


resisting a lawful order

resisting arrest

assault on a police officer


Baloney. There was no lawful order given. THe officer/department may assert that it was lawful...but it wasn't.

Her arrest was illegal.

Her assault was self defense.

So again...what crime was she performing that led to her arrest?


Her arrest was legal.

The officer felt threatened and ordered her to leave her vehicle. Whether he was right or wrong she needs to listen to that order.

She'll never get to fight those charges because of the way she acted and the choices she made.


No. It wasn't a lawful order. it was a request, worded like a request, that she chose to disregard.

And her arrest was a violation of her rights.

Which is a violation of all our rights.

"And when they came for me, there was no one left....."

But you are right: she won't get to fight that in court. Because a healthy woman was wrongfully taken into custody, and died subsequently.

Something to point out, though: you don't even know this woman. But you said this regarding this issue:


Just someone who is feed up with criminals being put on a pedestal and looked at as some kind of martyrs.



See how easy propaganda works? You call this woman a "criminal", when it is arguable that she should have even been stopped to begin with. And it is laughable that her detention was justifiable. But you call her a criminal, and take the position she is responsible for her own death.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 04:29 PM
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originally posted by: MoreBeer

originally posted by: mOjOm

originally posted by: MoreBeer

resisting a lawful order



In a traffic stop, is it legal for an officer to order a driver to put out a cigarette and exit the car?

Ms. Bland has a right to smoke in her car, but Trooper Encinia could argue that the cigarette was interfering with legitimate police business. Since he had already processed the papers, however, “I don’t see a good reason,” said Robert Weisberg, a criminal procedure expert and law professor at Stanford University.

During a traffic stop, a police officer has the right to ask a driver to get out of the car even for a non-arrestable offense, as a way of securing his own safety. The officer has almost complete discretion and the driver is legally obligated to get out when asked. “He has control over the location of drivers,” Mr. Weisberg said. “It is equal to an officer patting you down to see if you have a gun.”

In this case, Mr. Weisberg said, there is no evidence that Trooper Encinia feared for his safety. He would have to argue that Ms. Bland’s refusal to put the cigarette out gave him the impression that she was violent. If Trooper Encinia had feared for his safety, he would not have walked away from the car for five minutes, Mr. Weisberg said.

Link


Whether or not it was lawful is certainly up for debate.


Yep fully agree but she will never get to fight any of the charges because of the way she acted.


So you believe her behavior led to her death? And not a suicide?



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 04:30 PM
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originally posted by: MoreBeer
Yep fully agree but she will never get to fight any of the charges because of the way she acted.


I'd say she will never get to do anything ever again because this officer abused his power, made an unlawful arrest, didn't follow proper procedure and created a situation that led to this woman's death.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 04:30 PM
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a reply to: mOjOm

The early part of the stop tends to show no reason for him to be concerned. I looks to me as though he just go an attitude and his ego as a cop took over. As others have mentioned, a poor attitude isn't against the law and it doesn't get to make law either.




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