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New Bob Lazar information video with a twist!

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posted on Sep, 10 2015 @ 02:58 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur


Not that I believe everything sight unseen, but whoever said in the quoted critique, that element 115 is always unstable doesn't know science very well. Sure, here on earth, when synthesizing 115, only the first beginning isotopes will be there because of the neutron number. And no science exists here yet to add neutrons to an isotope, and,or, not in the amounts needed to make even a tiny speck of the material...

If the neutron numbers are increased through a much more efficient mechanism like a big star, then it would be able to make super-heavy elements with stable isotopes. 115 and other elements yet unknown as well. It has already been predicted for there to be islands of stability within radioactive elements by increasing the number of neutrons, to where that island of stability is within the isotopic range of an element.. If this same element was being produced by a star somewhere where that star was much denser and larger than our own star, it could easily produce stable isotopes..

Our own star SOL fizzles out at Uranium..
edit on 10-9-2015 by NoCorruptionAllowed because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 10 2015 @ 03:39 PM
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originally posted by: Arbitrageur

originally posted by: stormbringer1701
As for Bob's claim about gravity and the strong force evidence has emerged that relates QM gravitons to gluons which is the carrier of the strong force. The work recieved the Sakurai prize for theoretical physics.
Bob said there's no such thing as gravitons.
So Bob subscribes to relativity, (like you?)

Relativity is a respectable model. it's predictions have borne out. but a model is not the thing it is a model of. i can model time with a series of gears and it will keep near perfect fidelity to the thing it models. but it is not time itself and it explains nothing about what time really is or how it really works. My appreciation of Relativity is great as it should be. But at some point it will be found to not be adequate at describing some extreme set of physical circumstances just as Newtonian physics was. Does not mean Newtonian physics is disproven. And when relativity departs from perfectly describing the universe it will not mean that relativity is disproven.

QM also describes how the universe works and it does a great job. And it says there are gravitons. it's not perfected but it is as respectable as relativity in it's own lane.

So there may be gravitons or there may not.

And if Bob does not beleive in gravitons it's kind of irrelevant because maybe gravitons believe in him.
edit on 10-9-2015 by stormbringer1701 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 10 2015 @ 03:55 PM
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originally posted by: NoCorruptionAllowed
a reply to: Arbitrageur


Not that I believe everything sight unseen, but whoever said in the quoted critique, that element 115 is always unstable doesn't know science very well. Sure, here on earth, when synthesizing 115, only the first beginning isotopes will be there because of the neutron number. And no science exists here yet to add neutrons to an isotope, and,or, not in the amounts needed to make even a tiny speck of the material...

If the neutron numbers are increased through a much more efficient mechanism like a big star, then it would be able to make super-heavy elements with stable isotopes. 115 and other elements yet unknown as well. It has already been predicted for there to be islands of stability within radioactive elements by increasing the number of neutrons, to where that island of stability is within the isotopic range of an element.. If this same element was being produced by a star somewhere where that star was much denser and larger than our own star, it could easily produce stable isotopes..

Our own star SOL fizzles out at Uranium..


It more than that though. if those scientific teams had synthesized anything other than an unstable isotope they would not have found it. The experiment doesn't work like that. someone actually asked them if was possible that they had created stable isotopes of 115 and the scientist interviewed said they would not have seen it because thier detectors do not detect stable atoms. implicitly not only that it had to decay to be detected but even unstable atoms that decayed after a longer interval would be hard to detect. it had to decay in thier instruments field of "view" and it and it had to do so while the instrument was "looking." if it moved outside that range and decayed or decayed after the experiment stopped collecting decay events they would not see it. ditto if it did not decay at all.



posted on Sep, 10 2015 @ 04:09 PM
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If they had made stable atoms of element 115 they would not have seen them.

Dr. Joshua Patin nuclear physicist at the livermore facility that produced element 115 and on the team that did it:



Also along those lines ­ if it is something that lives as long as I guess what you are saying, it's nothing we would see. We see the decay of these elements through their radioactive decay. And we can see them because they have such short life times, such short half lives. So during the course of an experiment, we expect a decay to occur. If they weren't radioactive and were stable, we would never see them. We only see the energy that is given off in their decay.


www.bibliotecapleyades.net...
edit on 10-9-2015 by stormbringer1701 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 10 2015 @ 04:34 PM
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so if you want to prove or disprove the bedrock idea of Bob Lazar's tale there are a couple of ways you can do it and they do not involve his employment at secret facilities or his educational credentials. they are irrelevant.

number one is to add neutrons to unstable samples of element 115. that's a tall order because it takes a nuclear accelerator and collider and involved exquisite precision and timing. That physicist says there is no way to add neutrons to order. he is wrong. That is right. a credentialed nuclear physicist who is a subject matter expert is wrong. there is a way. and it is unfortunate that he is wrong because this is a proliferation hazard without equal. you can make a slow neutron source if you are a high school student with no morals. See the nuclear boy scout.

number two is to experiment with element 115's less rare cousin; Bismuth. the situation in it's nucleonic configuration is identical to element 115 except with one less shell. it is purported to have the same sort of weird gravitic properties as element 115. A man by the name of wallace actually has a patent for a bismuth based gravity force generator.

patent numbers: 3,626,605 and 3,626,606

www.google.com...,626,605&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CB4Q6AEwAGoVChMIrLGDxLXtxwIVQZqACh1-AgrA


www.google.com...

if those claims are true then Bob's claims are true. It is testable.



posted on Sep, 10 2015 @ 08:54 PM
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a reply to: stormbringer1701

Cool stuff there, yeah I remember when the Darmstadt Germany physicists team first found it, and before that I had read a paper on super heavy elements from their native stars being naturally occurring in their native solar systems, when those stars are super giants, or giants which enables further self synthesis of light elements to the heavy ones or maximum ones based on the the star's properties that's required to keep the process going. Obviously, someone from elsewhere has discovered the material and other elements as naturally belonging to their solar systems which have a denser, larger star than ours.

This was what I read about it, and they were theorizing about those islands of stability and how stars would be doing all the work they are trying to duplicate, which, seems like it would be a daunting task just like the difficulties they are having using technology, and the time a particle accelerator takes to make a few atoms of element material.

I've talked to several physicists at a local university who all have studied these theory's and papers about star fusion processes and yet unknown super heavy elements that might have these islands of stability.

Very thought provoking stuff in any case..



posted on Sep, 10 2015 @ 09:02 PM
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a reply to: stormbringer1701

Not too long ago I found a web site that supplies packs of rare earth metals which also had little ingots and chips of bismuth available, and the bismuth was really inexpensive. Not that I have time to play with bismuth, but maybe after I read that book you mentioned?

Just for curiosity's sake I'll be checking it out..

Thanks!



posted on Sep, 10 2015 @ 09:09 PM
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a reply to: stormbringer1701

Good points every one of them, I hadn't thought about their equipment not detecting stable particles, but I did think about where in the isotopic range they might need to be to even find stability, and I always pictured that up there a ways, perhaps much further than what they might even attempt to even find, but I'm of the opinion some new discovery might give insight into the design of better ways to look into those things.. That could be already done in some black budget lab somewhere, but it's hard to know. (Or talk about even if I do know).



posted on Sep, 10 2015 @ 10:28 PM
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originally posted by: NoCorruptionAllowed
a reply to: stormbringer1701

Good points every one of them, I hadn't thought about their equipment not detecting stable particles, but I did think about where in the isotopic range they might need to be to even find stability, and I always pictured that up there a ways, perhaps much further than what they might even attempt to even find, but I'm of the opinion some new discovery might give insight into the design of better ways to look into those things.. That could be already done in some black budget lab somewhere, but it's hard to know. (Or talk about even if I do know).
to be absolutely clear; the physicist also said that it is unlikely at the energies and ion weights and collision targets they used they could have added the additional neutrons to make potentially stable isotopes. they probably need about 11 or 12 more neutrons without busting up the target. I just want to point out that if they had managed it they would not know it.



posted on Sep, 10 2015 @ 10:29 PM
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originally posted by: NoCorruptionAllowed
a reply to: stormbringer1701

Not too long ago I found a web site that supplies packs of rare earth metals which also had little ingots and chips of bismuth available, and the bismuth was really inexpensive. Not that I have time to play with bismuth, but maybe after I read that book you mentioned?

Just for curiosity's sake I'll be checking it out..

Thanks!
When i have more money to blow and more room to tinker i may just try some bismuth experiments.



posted on Sep, 10 2015 @ 11:44 PM
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originally posted by: NoCorruptionAllowed
a reply to: stormbringer1701

Cool stuff there, yeah I remember when the Darmstadt Germany physicists team first found it, and before that I had read a paper on super heavy elements from their native stars being naturally occurring in their native solar systems, when those stars are super giants, or giants which enables further self synthesis of light elements to the heavy ones or maximum ones based on the the star's properties that's required to keep the process going. Obviously, someone from elsewhere has discovered the material and other elements as naturally belonging to their solar systems which have a denser, larger star than ours.

This was what I read about it, and they were theorizing about those islands of stability and how stars would be doing all the work they are trying to duplicate, which, seems like it would be a daunting task just like the difficulties they are having using technology, and the time a particle accelerator takes to make a few atoms of element material.

I've talked to several physicists at a local university who all have studied these theory's and papers about star fusion processes and yet unknown super heavy elements that might have these islands of stability.

Very thought provoking stuff in any case..
I think this is something i read but am not sure due to the passage of time...

when physicists and astronomers say novae and super novae do not produce anything heavier than uranium or plutonium they in fact mean in significant amounts. they do make traces of heavier elements. presumably these decay in due order.
But supernovae are not the end of the big energetic stellar event scale. Certain star systems produce billions of times more energy and matter than even supernovae at the end of their lives as stars.. These events or at least on such event is called a hyper nova. it is thought that hypernovae have several different causes among which are certain binaries with a giant star primary swells to envelope a partner than has already become a neutron star, white dwarf or similar remnant.

Hyper novae have the mass and power to go beyond uranium in significant amounts. significant in the terms of producing useful amounts of rare super heavy isotopes.

there are other cosmic systems that could also presumably result in nuclear synthesis beyond uranium.

the deal is that when you are dealing with the synthesis collision events available to something as massive as a super giant star even tiny percentages amount to maybe megatons of every possible isotope. if not megatons then surely kilotons or tons.



posted on Sep, 11 2015 @ 08:51 AM
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serendipitiuosly this article appeared in new scientist. unserendipitiously i do not have a subscription. i wonder if the new updated model of novae explosion nuclear synthesis mentioned has more room for super heavies?

www.newscientist.com...



posted on Jan, 3 2016 @ 10:54 PM
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When addressing the Lazar story we have to weigh what we KNOW against what we don't know. We KNOW he lied about his education. Knapp (nor anyone else) has confronted this issue directly. All we get are euphemisms like "sketchy" or "unverified," etc. But the fact is that Lazar has been lying about his credentials since day one. We KNOW he was attending Pierce Junior College at the time he said he was attending MIT. We also KNOW Lazar has never published a single physics paper anytime, anywhere. What else do we KNOW?

We KNOW he was at Los Alamos, working as technician for Kirk Meyer. There's a big difference between working FOR Los Alamos and working AT Los Alamos. With Lazar, we KNOW it was the latter. We also know he was passing himself off as a physicist to anyone who asked. So we KNOW he fancies himself as a physicist, despite having no official credentials. What else do we KNOW?

We KNOW Lazar is very technically apt as a hands-on mechanical technician. The man built a jet car after all. He's no dummy. So we KNOW he would have had the skills to work for Kirk Meyer on their Particle Accelerator at Los Alamos. So if we combine these two facts, that A) Lazar was misrepresenting his credentials as far back as the mid 80s, and B) He had the technical skills and enough hands-on knowledge to pass himself off as being more credentialed than he really was, and C) He certainly looks the part of a smart, nerdy physicist, then there's a very good chance he simply bull#ted his way into Kirk Mayer and they didn't really bother to check his background since he was (and always has been) a very convincing guy.

So just because we KNOW Lazar was working AT Los Alamos doesn't render his other lies irrelevant. But I agree with Knapp; what you can DO matters more to the powers at be than what you learned at any ivy league school. There is enough evidence to show that Lazar was a very skilled mechanical & electrical technician notwithstanding his abysmal education. Mozart was a musical genius before he could read music. Lazar's talents were such that nobody got suspicious and simply took him at his word and let his productivity speak for itself.

Like Knapp, I also believe that Lazar worked at the test site for a short period of time, and there is some evidence to support this. So I part company with the other skeptics who say Lazar lied about his time at the test site. So that leaves us with only one of two possibilities. The first possibility was posited by researcher, Tom Mahood, and it's a pretty good explanation. It goes like this:

1. Lazar interviews at EG&G, and based on his experience at Los Alamos, he's cleared to work at the test site.
2. Lazar is one of several technicians who are maintaining a highly classified mobile particle accelerator device. The rumor at the time (based on filed patents) is that this accelerator can create ball plasma for the purpose of fooling radar by creating false radar returns. When fired in the night sky, balls of bright plasma appear that can jump at the speed of light - not unlike waving a huge flashlight in the sky - only without seeing the beam, only the light at the end. To the observer on the ground, it's a light in the sky performing incredible maneuvers, silently of course.
3. Lazar, being the bull#ter he is, asks his friends if they'd like to see a UFO test (knowing it's NOT a flying saucer, but a ball of plasma generated by the device Lazar was helping maintain). Since he's telling his friends it's a flying saucer, Lazar figures he's not violating his 10/10 agreement.
4. We KNOW Lazar brings three friends out to the “white mailbox” to witness the test-firing of the accelerator which is dragged out to Papoose and fired off there. We KNOW Lazar and his friends get busted.
5. Now in deep # Lazar is given a choice: either A) Go to jail, or B) propagate in earnest the UFO story. He opts for B and is then taken into the “briefing room” he always speaks of where he is given all kinds of UFO-related material from which he is to develop his disinformation story. And we KNOW that the UFO topic is the government’s favorite go-to story to mislead the public as to what’s really going on at the test site and elsewhere. (See the film, “The Mirage Men”). Unfortunately, UFO researchers are easy prey and are often their own worst enemy when it comes to disclosure.
6. Lazar goes public with his story. Apart from this story, Lazar remains as uninterested in UFOs as any skeptic. He doesn’t delve into private theoretical research, publish any papers, or show any passion whatsoever for the topic. The whole thing becomes a chore for him, but one with which he is obliged to perpetuate.
I think this is a good explanation of all the Lazar contradictions while making perfect sense when we factor in what we KNOW about Lazar, his skills, and his credentials.
HOWEVER, there’s ANOTHER option: that Lazar is telling the truth about his activities at the test site as he understands it. But if so, then it leads to a different conclusion, again, based on what we KNOW about Lazar. Here’s that version of events.
1) Lazar interviews at EG&G. They look into his background and realize that A) He’s skilled enough to have worked at Los Alamos, but B) He’s be conning people for some time regarding his education. So he can be used and then easily discredited if need be.
2) Lazar is unknowingly recruited into a psychological operation (PsyOp) involving highly classified anti-gravity technology to see if he can figure out how it works.
3) The whole operation is set up for his experience only. It’s a human experiment to see if the technology could be back-engineered by foreign agents if it were to fall into enemy hands; at the same time, the technology is exposed to Lazar with the full knowledge that this guy will tell someone and spread UFO disinformation to help cover the Stealth & Aurora program that was still under wraps at the time.
4) The Sport Model is designed to look alien but really uses Skunkworks /Grumman advanced propulsion technology. Lazar is told a bunch of misinformation about the technology, and is not able to decipher how it actually works. In all of his testimony, he “is told” how it works.
5) He gets busted when he brings his friends out there and the rest is history. Lazar spreads the UFO story providing cover for the real black ops going on out there, and is discredited just like the gov’t predicted – which is why he was recruited in the first place.

The LAST possibility is that Lazar is telling the truth. And the reason he was hired was because he could be easily discredited. But based on Lazar’s own testimony, the psyop makes the most sense.



posted on Mar, 8 2016 @ 06:52 PM
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Full interview with Dr Robert Krangle here (Audio)

www.extraordinarybeliefs.com...



posted on Mar, 8 2016 @ 09:33 PM
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originally posted by: Br0ckout
Full interview with Dr Robert Krangle here (Audio)

www.extraordinarybeliefs.com...
So we've got one guy who is probably not a doctor but claiming to be a doctor vouching for another guy who is also lying about his credentials. Brilliant!

Did Krangle state the field for his 1973 PhD from MIT? Where is his PhD thesis? What was the topic, what is the title, and is it in the MIT library?


(post by JeremyCorbell removed for a serious terms and conditions violation)

posted on Aug, 25 2016 @ 09:41 PM
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originally posted by: NowanKenubi
Well, if someone can officially come forward and say; "Yes, Lazar was there, then.", that leads to why are there no records of Lazar if he was only working on normal stuff. I mean, an institution can loose documents, but lots of institutions loosing pertinent info on one person, at the same time? hmm.

Also, why now?


Looking back in recent and not so recent history with UFO cases that had a lot of potential to harm the military agenda, is a pattern of just that; Erasing people's histories and their documentation. It has happened before where college records, military service, employment, and all kinds of vital statistics are expunged by black budget government or insiders.

I always knew Lazar was speaking the truth about his story just from gut instinct which for me is rarely wrong.



posted on Aug, 25 2016 @ 10:01 PM
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originally posted by: Shamrock6
Just curious how more hearsay means anything?

Not knocking the OP. I hope it's true. But right now all it is, is a guy saying he talked to a guy who says he remembers Bob.

Doesn't really amount to much of anything. The guy could've had the conversation with a donut and it would carry the same weight.

Hopefully the good doctor decides to come forward himself. Sadly, though, I'm not holding much hope out.


The Bob Lazar "legend" continues to grow but stuntedly. What does he matter? I'm never going to accept tales of working with "captured" alien craft and back-engineering or any of that crap. We haven't had any leap in technology or aviation as a result of such claims. The status quo is still quo.

And, worse, Lazar's "craft" look suspiciously identical to "Billy" Meier's Beamship which was a model!

Whoever or whatever Lazar is, I don't care. And hearsay doesn't impress me either.



posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 05:11 PM
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I was looking at some info about the Janet Flights on the dreamlandresort website until i saw this picture posted there...

Janet Terminal Las Vegas 1/20/2003

Notice the red car parked at the terminal parking space. Yes, it is a red Corvette, exactly like the one Bob Lazar has or had in that year. Isn't that a big coincidence?

We all know Lazar has contracts with gov departments but maybe he was still working at area 51 or TTR in 2003.



posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 10:28 PM
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a reply to: NoCorruptionAllowed

If he went to MIT, someone in one of the classes he took should be able to verify he was there, you just cant erase that.

Lazaar claims to know the names of the 20ish people who worked with him there at s4, but refuses to release the names. Fine, but get someone he trusts(George Knapp) to go see if any of them are willing to corroborate his story. Even if it is off the record, that would be something, we arent even able to get that...

Lazaars story has ways it could be verified, the fact it hasnt happend after this much time leaves me more than suspicous. I could be wrong here, but I dont see how to come away from his story thinking it isnt fictional.




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