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Greece and China, who so little negative reactions?

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posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 05:35 PM
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I've held the view that the international monetary system was a house of cards with 'IOU's backing IOUs and the house of cards was ready to come tumbling down.

Rightly or wrongly, I've also considered that the vested interests were doing everything their power to avert collapse.

Other than a few jitters in the markets for a day or two, here we are. The sun is still rising in the east, just as it should. No collapse...almost no market consequence whatsoever.

Am I missing something? Has there been backdoor move that has helped to avert disaster or has the 'fragility' of our world economy been exaggerated? Just another 'a meteor will hit us 'someday' hype?

Any thought on the matter?




posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 05:39 PM
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I'm no expert; imho Greece's economy is too small to have much impact. plus, it's a known failure.
I think the prevailing view is that China will fix it's own house. I wonder how much we really (REALLY) know about what goes on there. they might be closer to a real collapse than they let on. and that would have the proverbial repercussions.

thx for topic



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 05:51 PM
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a reply to: works4dhs

On Greece, I figured similarly, small, not a major player in any way.

China as well, the way they've invested/divested their currency, internationally, one could assume they knew full well this was coming and prepared as well as they could. in advance.

I've also thought the drop in oil prices has bought breathing room for the Eurozone, the U.S. Dollar and made China Billions almost daily- the U.S.'s oil reserves are virtually number one in the world.

Perhaps a little 'wiggle room' that allows for these little 'corrections'?..



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 05:57 PM
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a reply to: nwtrucker

Greece is systemically important to the Eurozone and the Euro currency. Don't let anyone tell you different. It's a house of cards with a number of large EU banks levered up on Greek sovereign bonds. They all currently mark at face value. If that were to change suddenly, you would have a Lehman moment where no one knows the status of counter parties. It would freeze the financial markets. Germany is playing better poker than Greece. Obviously they have more options. In a sense Greece has a trump card.

The Greek debt. "negotiation" is important to anyone valuing democratic systems of government. A sovereign nation and the flesh of it's citizens are now pledged as collateral for EU banks to liquidate as they see fit.

This is the breaking point. Citizens will have nothing to lose and everything to gain by going off. They are a proud people and this country has a long history of innovation. It will come through if it bails on the EU. That's the answer. It's one of the few remaining possible outcomes and it's the best for Greece.

These profiteers can maintain the status quo longer than most believe. I really think the breakdown will be soon. The government will be overthrown. Russia and China will step in to provide humanitarian aid, not the US. I will book a Greek vacation as soon as they abandon the Euro.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 06:11 PM
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a reply to: InverseLookingGlass

Wow!

I can believe that that storm is still playing out. Not unlike the 'too big to fail' mentality of financial institutions in the U.S.?

Where I am surprised is the idea that Greece somehow will come out of this without consequence. They will be punished. Be it trade-wise or whatever. Russia might lend military support-they've had their hands in Greece for a long time-and China might help as well-if they survive their own internal policies...

What TPTB can't allow is defaulting without setting an example that deters others from similar plans. Rightly, I reckon.

Incompetent gov't is Greece's downfall and I wouldn't reward them with a vacation nor any of their products for that matter. JMO, though.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 06:41 PM
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a reply to: nwtrucker

The problem is that everyone is in debt at least to some degree to someone else. If even one player gets out without having to repay that debt or face serious repercussions for not paying off their debtors, then everyone leaps out, and you have widespread, systemic chaos all over the system, top to bottom. For TPTB, this is obviously not what they want.

I think at this point, it's a race between how quickly TPTB can bring about the controlled collapse and whether or not the bit players start to pull out of their own accord and bring about the collapse early despite the efforts to maintain control.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 06:58 PM
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a reply to: nwtrucker

China has done quite alot to prop up their market; from June 12th til July 10th they lost $3.2 TRILLION U.S DOLLARS. They have mandated any investor/company that owns 5% of ANY company stock in the Chinese market CAN NOT sell anything for a minimum of 6 months. It might be wise to keep in mind the "computer glitch" on the NYSE came at a time the market was down by 200+ and picking up steam but the "closing" of trading stopped the fall in it' s tracks. Also, the majority of the CHINESE people who lost money were the up&coming middle class who borrowed on margin to invest.

If you look back in America's history...EVERY twenty years or once a generation thre middle class is decimated by some type of bubble. My cynicism leads me to believe China has taken cues on how to keep the "DREAM" alive in a Capitalist Economy!



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 06:59 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

LOL. You open another can of worms.

I don't believe there is such a thing as a controlled collapse. Contradictory.

Once it starts, there's no stopping it. Like an avalanche.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 07:02 PM
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a reply to: fshrrex

So the world-wide opinion of China's trouble is along the lines of "Oh, we've seen this before, hold the course and they'll 'come out of it' "?

It makes sense.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 07:11 PM
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originally posted by: nwtrucker
a reply to: ketsuko

LOL. You open another can of worms.

I don't believe there is such a thing as a controlled collapse. Contradictory.

Once it starts, there's no stopping it. Like an avalanche.



I don't think it will work the way they plan either, not quite.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 07:50 PM
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a reply to: nwtrucker

I'm not quite sure if you were being sarcastic or not.

If you notice in American history the consistent gap between the haves and have nots. The middle class is "allowed" to suceed for 20-25yrs then they are sheared like sheep and harvested for their wealth. Do some withstand the harvest...Yes... and the "DREAM" is passed on to the new turks/young bucks to reach for the stars again.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 10:19 PM
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a reply to: fshrrex

I wasn't being sarcastic. I can see it. It is an explanation.

Where we part ways is the have/have not issue and being "allowed". That is a fairly recent development, from what I can see. What you label a harvest, I liken to a 'storm'....much more palatable. LOL

I'm leaving this earth the same way I came in. I fully appreciate the life I've had, the opportunities, whether taken or missed, and the phenomenal latitude I've had to 'make my own bed'.

Your 'harvest' is a tad too cynical, even for me...



posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 01:55 PM
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Other than a few jitters in the markets for a day or two, here we are. The sun is still rising in the east, just as it should. No collapse...almost no market consequence whatsoever. Am I missing something?


Simply put, it won't fail, because while the powers that be may disagree on things, the one thing they DO agree on, is that it must NOT fail, or they lose their power/influence, etc. So, no matter what, they'll do whatever it takes to ensure it doesn't fail, at least up until it is simply inevitable and does so of its own accord.

Greece, too small to affect the global economy. But, they did make a deal at the 11th hour, so still on the Euro for now (until the first payment is due).

China, the worlds largest producer isn't going anywhere anytime soon, and the market knows it.



posted on Jul, 20 2015 @ 02:02 PM
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originally posted by: nwtrucker
Am I missing something? Has there been backdoor move that has helped to avert disaster or has the 'fragility' of our world economy been exaggerated? Just another 'a meteor will hit us 'someday' hype?


I'll take the bolded part for 1000 Alex.



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