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The upcoming cost of food.

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posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 10:34 AM
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DOOM PORN time...

The entire midwest has been hammered with rain and our crops are suffering big time. Quite a bit of fields are under water due to flooded Rivers and Creeks. Fields that aren't in flood zones look like swampy messes. All the Soy bean fields look horrible. They're all burnt, withered and saturated. Not sure if the beans will recover at all. The bean fields have been on my mind quite a bit, as there is a lot of uses for Soy beans, but that worry grew on me last night.

I went into the Corn field behind my house to check the Corns status. It's feed Corn, but when you catch it at the right time, it's damn good eating. It's a muddy mess and the first several rows look really bad and stunted, but about ten rows in, the Corn is about ten feet tall, so that's where I went. There wasn't one ear of Corn anywhere. I walked for over an hour looking and only found stalks and mud.

I know this isn't an Illinois thing, as we've all been hammered with rain. So I have a bad feeling about the prices of food that's going to hit us. With the drought in California and the severe flooding elsewhere, it's going to be devastating in a few months.

What do y'all see from your crops? Okay or ugly?

As a parting gift, Jade Helm 15 is being ran to prepare for the coming food riots!




posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 10:45 AM
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a reply to: KawRider9

I hope we hear some positive news from others here on ATS, but I'm not optimistic.

I do believe you're right. Time to stock up on tuna, spam and canned veggies I suppose.


Global Food Crisis Mid-Century
edit on 14-7-2015 by FamCore because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 10:59 AM
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a reply to: KawRider9

I don't know about the future. The last time I went shopping, a large yellow onion cost two dollars …



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 11:48 AM
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SOuthern Indiana is flooded too. The bridge at Mt. Vernon, IN crossing into Illinois looks 5 times as wide. The fields (1000's of acres of soy and corn) are completely under water. Mega water in the midwest and dry as a raisin out west...



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:00 PM
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a reply to: Neopan100

Kentucky and Tennessee are also like a rain forest lately.
On a good note tho , I am getting Zucchini the size of watermelons lol. Everyone of my tomatoes are just gone. It appears when they get too much water, the bottom half of them turn black and look rotten.( Looking for confirmation on that tomato issue.)

This is not normal rainfall in my area.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:02 PM
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a reply to: FamCore
I don't know about commercial farming in my state Georgia, but our very small backyard veggie
garden is real good this year on tomatoes, okra and green beans. We have lots of peppers, but
no squash.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:43 PM
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a reply to: KawRider9

The truth about revolutions and how and why they really happen in history......Food cost. If the cost of food rises to 40% of the populations disposable income bad things start happening and people revolt.




The cost of food in the US is actually pretty low and right around 10% of disposable income. The cost of food however is rising fast as inflation takes it toll month after month. Look at your grocery bill and see this simple honest truth. Inflation is actually about 10% I think and will continue rising as more and more money is printed to keep the economy afloat.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:48 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

Just think what beef is going to cost. You can't spend more money to feed the Cow than ya sell it for.

That honestly sounds like our government. That's another thread though...



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:48 PM
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a reply to: Skorpy

Sounds like you have blossom end rot.
I think it is due to a lack of calcium in the soil....maybe the extra rain is leaching minerals from your soil?

www.tomatodirt.com...
vegetablemdonline.ppath.cornell.edu...


I fertilize my plants every 2-3 weeks.....with a product that contains calcium.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:54 PM
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One of the homesteaders who live in Missouri I watch on YouTube has had there garden completely ruined by so much rain. Granted this was a small garden plot, but:




posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:58 PM
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I'm going with Sub on this. We have very low prices on food, for a variety of reasons. Even if the price of food doubles within the next 5 years, all that means is that we get in less calories, have less overweight, and adapt else die out. Oh well.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 01:21 PM
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I just got back from the Ohio Valley. Everything there is wet and it was in the 60s during the day. They said it has rained the whole summer. It was a shock to us, we have had up to 118 degrees here in South Carolina for weeks with no rain. America will have to go on a diet for the next year. The people in Ohio we saw are horribly obese. Many Fat people up there. Including Family we visited. Eating corn offers no nutrition for people anyways. The Indians who ate corn at the Cahokia mound area, died of starvation. Over 2000 Indians who depleted the game and ate corn instead died of malnutrition. Rice, Corn, Potatoes make you fat and offer no vitamins and minerals hardly. A year of dieting might be what we all need.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 01:43 PM
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originally posted by: pl3bscheese
I'm going with Sub on this. We have very low prices on food, for a variety of reasons. Even if the price of food doubles within the next 5 years, all that means is that we get in less calories, have less overweight, and adapt else die out. Oh well.





Some places like Russia the cost of food is 30-40% of disposable income. Do not get me wrong I think inflationary boundaries are adding up for the lowest wage earners.........Anyone under 15 dollars an hour. I believe in the next 5 years these boundaries could be reached as inflation keeps rolling along at a steady clip.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 01:52 PM
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a reply to: SubTruth

That's when decisions need to be made by the authorities to what degree they will give back to the pl3bs. The Saudis had to do that when the last wave of food panic/ revolutions in 09ish. If not, chop off their heads. Either which way, the people win. Pressures make, or break



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 02:27 PM
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a reply to: frugal





People in Asia eat vast quantities of rice, are they fat? people in Kenya eat vast quantities of corn, are they fat? Top potato consumers in the world? China and Russia. Do some traveling yourself and get some real world experience before making such ridiculous claims as these simple starches can make you fat.
edit on 14-7-2015 by One_Love_One_GOD because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 03:04 PM
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a reply to: KawRider9


It is so sad that food cost are becoming the main topic of survival these days. What people got to be aware of is that all these artificial restaurant jobs can dry up over night due to high food cost. Here (Japan), we have a different problem, labor shortage, can't get people to work in restaurants. Many have to close their doors after 6 months in operation.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 03:22 PM
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Um food prices are a few dollars higher now then they were a few years ago already....


I guesss we will just have to see.. Stock up on can goods if your worried etc.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 03:32 PM
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a reply to: SubTruth

I have noticed another aspect of rising food prices...when you buy food now notice how youare paying the same or higher among nt FOR LESSS FOOD! They are lowering the portions from like 16ozs to 12ozs.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 03:48 PM
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Could be the middle man has raised the retail price to cover higher costs.

The farmers are not seeing much of an increase in the price they receive at the rail head.

weekly corn prices from 2014 to present

weekly wheat prices from 2014 to present

Its a global farmers market these days so loss from midwest flooding gets covered by imports (we have a strong US dollar).

Should the value of the US dollar collapse we would need to rely almost exclusively on locally grown produce produce.

Just doom porn for now.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 03:55 PM
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a reply to: Cauliflower

This trend will continue to bite into the majority of U.S. households living paycheck to paycheck. Doom porn to you but a "f*ck you very much" reach around to alot of people.



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