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Pluto

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posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 05:29 PM
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I am so fascinated with how they are getting all that data back home. I remember reading (let me see if I can find, I think it was one of those Nasa update Youtube videos, and a comment from Alan Stern) that roughly 60 GB of data will be collected in total, at 1 kbps they will receive all that data (not that much data really) by October of next year! I work in IT, and can appreciate the sheer magnitude of what has been accomplished on this mission.

I am really looking forward for the contact back home, you can watch the countdown here.

pluto.jhuapl.edu...



But I really don't expect anything groundbreaking with the first set of images, but I am stoked regardless and I hope that I am wrong!!




posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 05:30 PM
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Just absolutely WOW. That place looks really dynamic.
I cannot wait until it gets imagery of the 3 or four dark circles below the equator. I think they must be chain impacts, but with resolution like we are going to soon get, it should be unmistakable how they were created.
Thanks for the excellent thread!



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 05:36 PM
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originally posted by: jaffo
To be fair then, shouldn't Neptune be demoted? I mean, if Neptune has not cleared its orbit of Pluto. . .

The "clearing" thing is not so much about getting rid of absolutely everything in its path, but about being gravitationally dominant in its orbit. There are plenty of asteroids in Jupiter's and other planets' way, but it's the planets who call the shots. Neptune has put Pluto into an orbital resonance with itself, and as long as Pluto stays away far enough, Neptune is happy. Neptune is the planet, and Pluto is just some small rock that manages not to get in the way.

edit on 14-7-2015 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 05:41 PM
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Some recent pictures uploaded on John Hopkins University Applied Physics site.



These are not actual color images of Pluto and Charon—they are shown here in exaggerated colors that make it easy to note the differences in surface material and features on each planetary body.

The images were obtained using three of the color filters of the “Ralph” instrument on July 13 at 3:38 am EDT.



pluto.jhuapl.edu...




Very cool pictures thus far!


edit on 14-7-2015 by smitastrophe because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 05:49 PM
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a reply to: smitastrophe

I have a dilemma, are those colours false in the sense that the camera used filters outside the visible range (i.e. infrared and UV), or that they are visible (and auto-balanced) colours with enhanced saturation.

This is because that "false-colour" image is very similar to mine I posted just a few posts earlier.

Sadly, NASA's news article doesn't specify which filters were used, only that the colours are "exaggerated". Which could mean they are real, visible colours with some balancing and lots of saturation.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 06:04 PM
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a reply to: wildespace

You are correct, that looks the same photo as the one that you linked in your earlier post. (My bad, I didn't click that far!
)

Unfortunately, I am not familiar with imaging techniques and haven't the slightest idea how they might have accomplished this. But you are right, NASA leaves it pretty open to interpretation.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 06:52 PM
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originally posted by: gortex
Cool picture.

I think I've found the entrance to inner Pluto where all the Plutonians live , or perhaps a Volcano ?




Just saying .. lol



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 07:05 PM
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originally posted by: wildespace
I've balanced the colours in PhotoShop and then increased saturation, to hopefully show the varied composition of the surface:



I think we can say that the bluish areas are frozen gasses like methane or CO, while the reddish areas are thick concentrations of hydrocarbon "sludge".

Compare this to the false-colour image from Ralph camera: www.nasa.gov...


In fact it seems the false color image is a b/w image combined with low res photos from Ralph.



Pluto nearly fills the frame in this image from the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) aboard NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, taken on July 13, 2015 when the spacecraft was 476,000 miles (768,000 kilometers) from the surface. This is the last and most detailed image sent to Earth before the spacecraft’s closest approach to Pluto on July 14. The color image has been combined with lower-resolution color information from the Ralph instrument that was acquired earlier on July 13. This view is dominated by the large, bright feature informally named the “heart,” which measures approximately 1,000 miles (1,600 kilometers) across. The heart borders darker equatorial terrains, and the mottled terrain to its east (right) are complex. However, even at this resolution, much of the heart’s interior appears remarkably featureless—possibly a sign of ongoing geologic processes.


Source



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 07:17 PM
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originally posted by: wildespace
a reply to: smitastrophe

I have a dilemma, are those colours false in the sense that the camera used filters outside the visible range (i.e. infrared and UV), or that they are visible (and auto-balanced) colours with enhanced saturation.

This is because that "false-colour" image is very similar to mine I posted just a few posts earlier.

Sadly, NASA's news article doesn't specify which filters were used, only that the colours are "exaggerated". Which could mean they are real, visible colours with some balancing and lots of saturation.


I found this



The New Horizons instrument named Ralph is a visible/near infrared multi-spectral imager and a short wavelength
infrared spectral imager. It is one of the core instruments on New Horizons, NASA’s first mission to the Pluto/Charon
system and the Kuiper Belt. Ralph combines panchromatic and color imaging capabilities with IR imaging
spectroscopy.




MVIC is composed of 7 independent CCD arrays on a single substrate. It uses two of its large format (5024x32 pixel)
CCD arrays, operated in time delay integration (TDI) mode, to provide panchromatic (400 to 975 nm) images. Four
additional 5024x32 CCDs, combined with the appropriate filters and also operated in TDI mode, provide the capability
of mapping in blue (400-550 nm), red (540-700 nm), near IR (780 – 975 nm) and narrow band methane (860 – 910 nm)
channels.


Still reading the rest of the document, but it goes deeper into the specs of the apparatus rather than the specs of the image. I wonder what is the exposure, just to have a grasp at how really "shiny" it should seem from a human eye from the same distance.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 07:21 PM
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on a differnt side of Pluto

Well

Isn't this Interesting !

'Star Trek' on Pluto? It Could Really Happen, Scientists Say
by Mike Wall, Space.com Senior Writer
www.space.com...


Craters and other types surfaces Might be named after Star Trek Characters !


a Way bigger Picture of Pluto and more detailed SO FAR See PAGE Below

This has never been seen by humans before: Most distant planet in our solar system is photographed in stunning detail by Nasa probe in closest flyby ever

Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk...
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook



This is the most detailed image captured of the surface of Pluto yet. It was taken by New Horizons and sent back shortly before it started its final approach towards the dwarf planet. The image reveals incredible detail of craters, possible mountain ranges and icy plains on the surface of the distant world


Possible mountain Ranges ?

as what was told if this Rock Ball has any ICE aka H2o on it it would be hard as granite and -3XX F-

Pluto as a Planet again ?





www.dailymail.co.uk...



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 07:31 PM
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originally posted by: Terminal1
My first thought was that it seems to be a lot smoother than the moon as far as craters go. I just imagined it being more "pockier" lol.

Nice photo though. Can't wait for the rest even though we have to (damnit!).

I think this is because it's in the outer system so evaded many of them. Could be for other reasons too. Venus for example is smooth-ish.
edit on 14-7-2015 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 07:36 PM
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originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: smurfy
I'll tell you what...Pluto's a planet! Look how round it is, in that picture anyway.


Of course it's a planet. A dwarf planet, like Ceres. Roundness has nothing to do with whether something is a planet though. There are asteroids which are round. Comets in some cases are round, etc.

Hmm. Ya I remember "roundness" being a factor, so I googled:
en.wikipedia.org - IAU definition of planet...

The definition of planet set in Prague in 2006 by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) states that, in the Solar System, a planet is a celestial body which:
...is in orbit around the Sun,
...has sufficient mass to assume hydrostatic equilibrium (a nearly round shape), and
...has "cleared the neighbourhood" around its orbit.

I guess what that means is it has enough self-mass to overcome its structure somewhat to produce a (nearly) round shape--an ellipsoid. I've read most
bodies larger than several hundred kilo-meters in radius are ellipsoid.

Here's a good article I found about the IAU definiton and how to better define a planet, writen by Steven Soter:
www.scientificamerican.com - What Is a Planet? ...

It seems the third criterion has people unhappy because it's ambiguous. If it were removed, there'd be more than 50 planets. However, with some reworking, it might be the best measure (read above article).

There's some confusion with the 2nd too. Mass is not the only factor in producing the ellipsoid shape. Chemical makeup is a factor. There're others. Large impacts and tidal forces and proximity to the sun, for example. A body can also attain hydrostatic equilibrium and lose it.

Here's an article I found about the 3rd criterion in the IAU:
io9.com - Should Earth get demoted from planet status just like Pluto?...

Here's the wiki on the 3rd criterion:
en.wikipedia.org - Clearing the neighbourhood...
edit on 14-7-2015 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 07:38 PM
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a reply to: Wolfenz

I love these photos of Pluto,
but I REALLY love that Pluto Meme!

I'm stealing it!

*swipe*



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 08:15 PM
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Are they selling T-shirts?

I want a T-shirt.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 08:17 PM
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originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: smurfy

originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: smurfy
I'll tell you what...Pluto's a planet! Look how round it is, in that picture anyway.


Of course it's a planet. A dwarf planet, like Ceres. Roundness has nothing to do with whether something is a planet though. There are asteroids which are round. Comets in some cases are round, etc.


Roundness has to do with it in a considerable part, even in the new 2006 definition,

is in orbit around the Sun,

has sufficient mass to assume hydrostatic equilibrium (a nearly round shape), and

has "cleared the neighbourhood" around its orbit.

So no I wasn't being trivial, and in fact from this picture, Pluto is remarkably round, (apart from what looks possibly like a huge crater) given that it is thought to have a very weak gravity field.


Ok you're correct. I guess I should have said, "roundness isn't the only thing".


Er Um, why didn't you then?
Like, a few hundred out of 10,000 members attend a convention, and something like five hundred of them vote about a load of bull#, without even a Quorum? FFS we don't even know the ethos of a planet other than our own, so we call Earth a planet, then go picky and choosy on all the other blobs that we know..or don't know. Absolutely amazing!
Enjoy your wing ding BTW.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 08:32 PM
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originally posted by: smurfy

originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: smurfy

originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: smurfy
I'll tell you what...Pluto's a planet! Look how round it is, in that picture anyway.


Of course it's a planet. A dwarf planet, like Ceres. Roundness has nothing to do with whether something is a planet though. There are asteroids which are round. Comets in some cases are round, etc.


Roundness has to do with it in a considerable part, even in the new 2006 definition,

is in orbit around the Sun,

has sufficient mass to assume hydrostatic equilibrium (a nearly round shape), and

has "cleared the neighbourhood" around its orbit.

So no I wasn't being trivial, and in fact from this picture, Pluto is remarkably round, (apart from what looks possibly like a huge crater) given that it is thought to have a very weak gravity field.


Ok you're correct. I guess I should have said, "roundness isn't the only thing".


Er Um, why didn't you then?
Like, a few hundred out of 10,000 members attend a convention, and something like five hundred of them vote about a load of bull#, without even a Quorum? FFS we don't even know the ethos of a planet other than our own, so we call Earth a planet, then go picky and choosy on all the other blobs that we know..or don't know. Absolutely amazing!
Enjoy your wing ding BTW.

Well roundness is tricky because--as noted in my previous post--it's influenced by chemical makeup, impacts, tidal forces, proxmity to sun and other things. It has to do with the rigidnity of its body which is tied to its internal temperature. Most bodies whic're several hundred kilo-meters or more in radius will be ellipsoid because of their self-mass, but smaller bodies can be ellipsoid too, so this is only a loose rule.

It looks like the 3rd criterion in the IAU is perhaps much better at distinguishing planets from other bodies than the 2nd. It has to do with how much mass the planet has versus the mass in its orbit. Earth actually has the most mass versus the rest of the mass in its orbit in the entire solar system--at ~1,700,000x. According to this measurement, neptune is the least planet-like of the 8 present planets--at ~24,000x. But dwarf planets like pluto and ceres are far and away not in the same ballpark, not in the same state, not in the same country! The dividing line is very clear. None of them have a discriminant greater than 1x.

Apparently the IAU doesn't have a strict cutoff for what's "clean its orbital neighborhood ." But there's not much need, given the cutoff is so balantly obvious. When we start discovering bodies which fall between 1x and 24,000x maybe it'll cause more hairs to be pulled out.
edit on 14-7-2015 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 09:11 PM
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Such a dim desolate place too back we couldn't build a prison there to send all of the degenerates.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 09:39 PM
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So, I was actually just with one of the people (from Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab) in charge of the mission for the past week and he gave a talk on the entire project. Insanely interesting to say the least. I'll have more time to post some other things that I learned from him, but quickly… I will say that this is not a color photo (and there will not be 'true' one). Most of the instruments are on board are there to measure spectrums/wavelengths that give scientific information, not to capture a photo pleasing to the eye. They can deduce the colors based on the readings taken and the elements present, but all 'color' is done in post. I'm guessing that this is a quick render and better (more true) versions will be released once the analysis is done. So cool though.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 10:22 PM
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Here we go, it has "Phoned home" as the headline says, the ship has made contact with Earth and is fine.

edition.cnn.com...



Laurel, Maryland (CNN)—NASA has re-established contact with its New Horizons spacecraft after a planned communications blackout as the probe completes humankind's first flyby of Pluto.

Mission managers who were packed into the New Horizons "mission control" room anxiously waiting to hear from the spacecraft broke into applause.


Live feed from the Mission Control room:

edit on 14-7-2015 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2015 @ 12:21 AM
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Whatever. Call me when we get to Mars. Or even just The moon.
edit on 15-7-2015 by chrisss because: eta The moon.




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