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The Birth of a Spray Plane

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posted on Jul, 12 2015 @ 07:54 AM
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a reply to: network dude


I don't know if the airstrips are invisible too

They're certainly very hard to find on Google Earth...




posted on Jul, 12 2015 @ 08:13 AM
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a reply to: waynos




Time to employ common sense.


In this forum...concerning chemtrails...good luck.



posted on Jul, 12 2015 @ 08:14 AM
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a reply to: waynos

Because of a lack of pictures or testimony regarding the existence of spray planes for the high altitude spraying missions, I too am skeptical of their existence. I am skeptical of the claim that contrails are actually high altitude spray patterns. Maybe they are, but I don't think the case has been made yet.

As for your fine pictures of the new livery on the 727, I am disappointed that no spray booms or atomizers are visible.

Having spent 10 years spraying agricultural chemicals, I am most curious as to how practical it will be to have a 727 attempting such a mission with that highly swept wing. I suspect that spraying over oil spills in the ocean would require fairly high volume of the material. It would be nice to know what sort of dispersal system they plan to use. It would be nice to see the interior arrangements of those 727



posted on Jul, 12 2015 @ 09:01 AM
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a reply to: Salander

I completely agree. I may request permission to go inside it when I'm off work in a few weeks. Of course, as a private company they can just say no, but they do seem happy to show it off.

I was perplexed at the choice of a 727 for this role too, then I saw the pilot chucking it round the sky like a fighter at this years Cosford air show, and I think I see where they are coming from


Having checked my pictures of the underside, I don't see anything that isn't normal for a 727.
edit on 12-7-2015 by waynos because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2015 @ 09:07 AM
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a reply to: Salander



That is a plane used in the Gulf oil spill. I think the key there, was to spray just above the water level.



posted on Jul, 12 2015 @ 10:39 AM
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originally posted by: VoidHawk
Go to a military airstrip and hang about outside with a camera and see how long it takes for you to be removed!


Here you go, here are a couple from Palmdale doing exactly that, and not trying to hide it at all.






edit on 7/12/2015 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2015 @ 11:24 AM
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a reply to: admirethedistance

I live outside Langlys west gate and can easily see their airstrip from the beach and from the nature preserve wet lands just off the runway.
Every summer these guys are so stupid they actually let the public in to see the air power up close. Guess they don't feel they have anything to hide there anyway.



posted on Jul, 12 2015 @ 05:37 PM
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a reply to: waynos

One of the 727s is the last one ever made. And the maximum amount of dispersant it can carry is less than 5000 gallons. That wouldn't last very long.



posted on Jul, 12 2015 @ 05:44 PM
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a reply to: F4guy
Thanks for that info. The last 727 ever built, wow.



posted on Jul, 12 2015 @ 06:58 PM
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originally posted by: F4guy
a reply to: waynos

One of the 727s is the last one ever made. And the maximum amount of dispersant it can carry is less than 5000 gallons. That wouldn't last very long.



No it wouldn't - seems like b-all actually - the useable payload is many times that...they must be hiding the "real chemtrails" in there without telling anyone!


But seriously - why such a small load??


Possibly weight and balance is an issue - liquid can be a concentrated load and getting rid of it fast might upset balance and trim, but I don't think it's dropping in a few seconds like a water tanker is it??



posted on Jul, 12 2015 @ 07:07 PM
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so why are the three hole smut butts gone now.....they shut off like a water hose...
757 huh!!!



posted on Jul, 12 2015 @ 07:17 PM
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a reply to: GBP/JPY

Same reason as the four holers are disappearing too. Bigger engines and ETOPS.



posted on Jul, 13 2015 @ 10:37 AM
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originally posted by: Aloysius the Gaul

originally posted by: F4guy
a reply to: waynos

One of the 727s is the last one ever made. And the maximum amount of dispersant it can carry is less than 5000 gallons. That wouldn't last very long.



No it wouldn't - seems like b-all actually - the useable payload is many times that...they must be hiding the "real chemtrails" in there without telling anyone!


But seriously - why such a small load??


Possibly weight and balance is an issue - liquid can be a concentrated load and getting rid of it fast might upset balance and trim, but I don't think it's dropping in a few seconds like a water tanker is it??


No, actually, it is much more likely a matter of floor structure. The EASA (the European version of the FAA) follows FAA standards very closely, and 727 floor structure strength has been a sore spot for the FAA for some time. In fact, the feds reduced the max container load on the 727-200F I flew from 8,000 pounds to 3,000 pounds.



posted on Jul, 13 2015 @ 10:41 AM
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originally posted by: GBP/JPY
so why are the three hole smut butts gone now.....they shut off like a water hose...
757 huh!!!

The 727 can't meet Stage 2 or 3 noise restrictions



posted on Jul, 13 2015 @ 11:18 AM
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Hasn't anyone just thought that maybe they just put chemicals into the jet fuel?

I mean come on, someone would notice all the extra tubing and equipment needed on all these planes spraying chemicals and say something. Someone would see barrels of chemicals at airports and wonder what they are and say something.

Wouldn't it be a lot easier to just put an additive into the fuel and no one be the wiser?

Has anyone had jet fuel analyzed to see if it contains metals and other elements that aren't needed?



posted on Jul, 13 2015 @ 01:10 PM
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originally posted by: MystikMushroom


Has anyone had jet fuel analyzed to see if it contains metals and other elements that aren't needed?


Yes, the do it several times a day, every day. And if you like, you can go to just about any airport, buy some fuel from them, and analyze it yourself. (it really is just that easy)

But if you talk to a guy who repairs Jet engines, he will explain in great detail why the fuel needs to be kept to the extremely tight tolerances that it is. (unless chemtrailing the unsuspecting populace becomes more important than keeping the planes in the sky while they are traveling.)



posted on Jul, 13 2015 @ 01:53 PM
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a reply to: network dude

My brother in law repairs Lear jet engines for a living. I'm pretty sure he'd know if there were weird additives put into the avgas. Besides, you can run a diesel truck on avgas (Jet A).



posted on Jul, 13 2015 @ 01:58 PM
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originally posted by: MystikMushroom
Hasn't anyone just thought that maybe they just put chemicals into the jet fuel?



Yeah, plenty have, but nobody has yet explained how any chemicals would survive the combustion process, certainly none of those supposed to be in chemtrails would.


I mean come on, someone would notice all the extra tubing and equipment needed on all these planes spraying chemicals and say something. Someone would see barrels of chemicals at airports and wonder what they are and say something.


Quite right


Wouldn't it be a lot easier to just put an additive into the fuel and no one be the wiser?

Has anyone had jet fuel analyzed to see if it contains metals and other elements that aren't needed?


Apart from the above, the composition of jet fuel is strictly controlled and it is tested regularly. Operators can't afford for something to be in there that shouldn't when a replacement engine alone is upwards of $20million
edit on 13-7-2015 by waynos because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 13 2015 @ 01:59 PM
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originally posted by: MystikMushroom
a reply to: network dude

My brother in law repairs Lear jet engines for a living. I'm pretty sure he'd know if there were weird additives put into the avgas. Besides, you can run a diesel truck on avgas (Jet A).


Have you asked him about all this? If he hasn't heard, I bet he will smile.



posted on Jul, 13 2015 @ 02:52 PM
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a reply to: network dude

He's ex military too, so he'd probably get a really big grin from chemtrails.



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