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Bears, Bob cats, Coyotes n stuff

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posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 12:46 PM
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Coyotes might eat your cats. They probably won't mess with four dogs.

We've got bobcats in the area but I've never heard of them presenting an issue with an encounter with humans or coming near a house.

We've got lots of black bears. They almost never pose a threat unless it's a mother with cubs. The big problem with bears is that they can cause a lot of damage foraging for food on your property. They will get into garbage, destroy bird feeders, they will go inside cars, garages, outside structures and even homes after food if the opportunity presents itself.




posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 12:51 PM
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originally posted by: zazzafrazz
The pets are all indoors at night.

We've a black bear boy 3 times since Spring, but we keep the trash in the garage till pickup day.

One bobcat sighting, which is my main concern.

The pets all get let out together and don't stray from the front yard, which is leveled landscaped for 5 acres and then hundreds of acres of wilderness and mountains, it is gods country, truly beautiful, We won't be here forever, but since this spring and summer we have had sightings of these amazing animals that are all new to me.

I heard a local say if I see the bear close and upfront to actually stand up as high as I can and yell loudly, arms up...anyone know bear confrontation etiquette?

Also maybe we can trap the bobcat and have it relocated by a professional? Do people know if people do this?




If a bobcat is not very shy of people, it would probably be killed to send a message. Many people spend their whole lives in the woods and the closest they get to seeing one is finding their tracks.

You might find someone willing to relocate it, but If it needs to be relocated, it probably needs to killed. I don't think a couple hundred miles would be a big deal for them to find their way back, but I really don't know.



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 12:53 PM
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originally posted by: zazzafrazz

Also maybe we can trap the bobcat and have it relocated by a professional? Do people know if people do this?



Keep your cats inside. Otherwise I don't think a bobcat is a problem if it is in fact just a bobcat. I think you're actually lucky to have seen one as they are very elusive but I'm not an expert.

I don't think having it trapped and relocated is a realistic idea even if it was demonstrably causing a problem. They don't relocate well and another animal might just move into the vacuum. You'd also need to check what the applicable laws are. What they say about coyotes around here is that if you see one and it isn't killing your livestock don't shoot them as they will just be replaced by another coyote that might be more of a problem.



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 12:59 PM
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a reply to: DelMarvel

Yes I have heard they are elusive, when we saw it my neighbor also came over and said he got it on the trail cam behind his house (across the road and down just a bit) I will ask him if he still has the footage and see if I can post it here

The bobcat worries me the most. The neighbor mentioned trapping it and relocating it, but according to a poster in thread they will come back?

I'm wanting to move back to the city faster than I thought after this thread lol!



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 01:26 PM
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a reply to: zazzafrazz

Really? Even after the statistics? I don't even step on bugs, and put spiders out the window. I wouldn't worry about the bobcat myself, but if I had pets, I'd put it down in a second and not think twice. If you ever see it again.

I don't know that it would come back, but they are territorial, I'm fairly certain it would try.



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 01:28 PM
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a reply to: ISawItFirst

Once again, this is telling "what these animals are capable of" instead of "what actually happens out here". If a fatal attack only happens once every twenty years in a nation of 320+ million people, that's a statistical anomaly. All you're doing is fear-mongering on what is possible, but not telling what is actually happening.

A meteorite can fall on me at any time & kill me. But should I be afraid of that? Of course not. Because there's only been a single verifiable person in recorded history who was hit by a meteorite strike, and she survived. The True Story of History's Only Known Meteorite Victim (EDIT: Supposedly there are other non-verified instances, but they're just as rare.)

For example, an American citizen is 9 times more likely to choke to death on our own vomit than die in a terrorist attack. Those are facts.. But people fear-monger on what is possible instead of focusing on the things that will actually hurt or kill them, like heart disease, car accidents, cancer, etc.

As for the OP, I'd just advise you to do some research on the area you live in. See how many attacks there have been, how often there are sightings, etc. Many counties (or States) have wildlife services which can even break down official population numbers for different animal species, their habitats, and safety tips. Then you can get a better idea of what you may actually have to deal with out there.
edit on 10-7-2015 by enlightenedservant because: added something because you never know...



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 01:35 PM
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a reply to: enlightenedservant




As for the OP, I'd just advise you to do some research on the area you live in. See how many attacks there have been, how often there are sightings, etc. Many counties (or States) have wildlife services which can even break down official population numbers for different animal species, their habitats, and safety tips. Then you can get a better idea of what you may actually have to deal with out there.



That is a very good suggestion, thank you!



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 01:39 PM
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a reply to: zazzafrazz

No problem. Our tax dollars go to these services so we might as well get our money's worth from them.



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 01:40 PM
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a reply to: zazzafrazz

If you are really concerned about predators you can always try keeping them away by using a bigger predators urine scent. There are places you can buy Bobcat, Wolf and even Mountain Lion urine.

One website is Leg Up Enterprises.

How they get this urine is another subject all together.



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 02:00 PM
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a reply to: TheLieWeLive

Kinda like the deer pods i have that are bear urine and dried human blood I just discovered, oh and putrid eggs....

Wonder if it comes in Velociraptor spray.



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 02:46 PM
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I hope you get to enjoy the place your at. If you do happen to be in NEPA i would love to give you some amazing hiking trails where you can see some wildlife and nature in general.



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 03:10 PM
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a reply to: xXGriMe

Oh we love it, we inherited it and came to fix it up for a couple of weeks, and that was 9 months ago.....I do miss Cali though, the sun and sea, but there is always time for that again. I feel like a crazy bush-woman here. I've become quite wild according to my sister



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 03:50 PM
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a reply to: enlightenedservant

I don't think I said anything about what the animals are capable of. Except hogs will rip you up if one comes by and you're on his trail. Ask a hog hunter why they trod heavy bush when there are clear trails feet away.

Nor did I encourage fear. If I saw a bobcat around, I would put it down, but only because my little dog runs around and thinks everything exists to please him.

And an animal as stealth as a bobcat getting seen repeatedly is a problem. Something up with a cat like that.

Anyways, if we did want to go the statistics route, well, I can't find a whole lot on injuries, only deaths, so we aren't seeing the whole picture.

But that would just be being argumentative, and I think we are primarily in agreement.

I've been face to face with a black bear at 2 am in the middle of the woods. It will get your heart pumping, but nothing really to fear.

Seeing a bobcat hanging around where people live is like seeing a raccoon in the day time. Something is off with that animal.

I doubly recommend that book, the contented poacher, it has recipes too!



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 03:56 PM
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a reply to: ISawItFirst

It wasn't repeatedly, it was a one off, the neighbors cam caught it either just before or just after we saw it.



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 04:05 PM
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originally posted by: vonclod
Make sure you leave no food sources or garbage that will attract bears..probably best to keep the cats inside.


This is the best advice in the thread. Up here in Alaska, people leaving their garbage and pet foods outside is the #1 creator of problem wildlife. It doesn't take long for a bear to associate homes with easy food if it has experience raiding improperly placed trash cans or big bowls of domestic pet food.

Other options you can certainly consider:
1. Get a shotgun and learn how to use it properly.
2. They sell single strand electric fences that you can string around your property. Most wild animals will avoid these entirely, especially if they're exploring out of curiosity.
3. I've read good results with sprinkling the commercially available wolf urine around the perimeter of your property. Unfortunately, this stuff will probably ensure you see no wildlife around your place, including critters like deer and rabbits which you may actually want visiting.



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 04:49 PM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6




this stuff will probably ensure you see no wildlife around your place, including critters like deer and rabbits which you may actually want visiting.


Me from my window yes, my garden however .....



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 05:55 PM
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A bear can kill most of your dogs, but is shy. Just don't surprise them. Don't get between a bear sow and her cub.
Cats will avoid the dogs but don't attack much. More people are killed by Moose but they are in the more northern regions.
Unpredictable, can't see them at night so go slow. Don't go near males during mating season.
Don't hit a moose with your car, will squash you flat.
Deer can be dangerous and can kill so don't get be fooled by "cute".
Bobcat's aren't going to be any problem. Never approach a wild animal. Most can at least bite.
Act non threatening if attacked, never run.
With big animals, clap, shout, whistle, and sing to let them know you are around so they can get out of your way.
If you see a trail with fresh tracks you are getting near the animal and when you run it down it will turn on you.
They know you are there long before you do, especially if they get your scent downwind.
Wolfs, Coyotes, wild dogs will follow you in the bush as will bears. Moose will circle around you.
Cats will stalk you and go for your neck. For a cat go for the eye gouge. Bear hit the nose very hard.
Stay out of the deep woods during mating season, hunting season, and when there is little food (except you).
People are the most dangerous, especially hunters. Best defense is pay attention to your intuition.
a reply to: zazzafrazz

edit on 10-7-2015 by starswift because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 06:44 PM
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In the desert where I'm from we have coyotes, bobcats, and on very rare occasions mountain lion and bear might wander down the mountain. Long story short, the real problems are the small common predators, and they tend to be a problem near water near dawn for people with small animals. If you have rabbits and water in a large fenced in area, you have a problem (country clubs lose toy dogs at an alarming rate), other than that you can shine a light before you go places where you might corner things, carry a weapon if you walk your dog in the morning, and you'll almost certainly never have a problem.

Specifically:

Coyotes kill pets at night. It's what they do. The females in particular will lure male dogs out into ambushes. Sometimes they are brazen and less concerned than usual by lights. Don't put your animals where there are coyotes at night. Shoot coyotes if possible.

Don't walk your dog in coyote bobcat country at dawn by the lake without a weapon- that's the human being who gets attacked by coyotes or bobcats. Other than that don't corner one- shine a light up before climbing something before dawn in an area where you have found tracks before.

Mountain lion stories are always second hand or media because they are rare, and it's pretty much always the same. You see them sizing you up at a distance, and you know they'd have stalked and killed you if you hadn't (gathered a crowd, got in the car and left, gone inside, shot the gun, etc) or else you just lose sight of them and figure they're gone. You count yourself lucky, then later that week your dog disappears. There's little you can do that I am aware of except keep something around that looks tastier and more convenient than you.

Every bear story is the same too. It was walking towards the lake, or it was rummaging through trash, and everyone came to see, and it ran away. Bears aren't a problem as long as you don't give them a reason to be.



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 06:49 PM
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originally posted by: zazzafrazz
a reply to: TheLieWeLive

Kinda like the deer pods i have that are bear urine and dried human blood I just discovered, oh and putrid eggs....

Wonder if it comes in Velociraptor spray.


Hope that works for you. In my experience nothing keeps the deer away permanently.



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 07:44 PM
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a reply to: zazzafrazz

As long as you don't leave food out or anything like that bears shouldn't be a problem. Coyotes kill pets, chickens, and stuff like that. They usually don't attack people but I think they would if they were hungry enough. There have been reports of people being attacked. A rifle would be of use. If you don't actually want to shoot anything you could shoot it into the air. The noise will scare whatever it is off.



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