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Ancient Chinese writing found on ancient stones in America

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posted on Jul, 11 2015 @ 11:54 AM
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originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: chosonone
a reply to: Harte

You stated "In fact, current thought is that what we refer to as "mongoloid" types actually arose in N. America and back-migrated."

Is there a source supporting your claim?

Brown mentions some of the evidence in this PDF.


What this means in terms of the evolution and dispersion of
people in the Asian region is unclear. At present the earliest people with
a generalised East Asian cranial morphology are probably found in the
Americas. Is it a possibility that migration across the Bearing Straits
went in two directions and the first morphological Mongoloids evolved
in the Americas?


Harte


That is the most pointless and endless ways to search for where Asians or Europeans or Africans first originated.
It could not have been America to have a race or ethnic group flourish and prosper a long ago because some catastrophic event took place here such as a devastating asteroid collision, polar shift or by some other causes. There's no significant remains of civilization or flourishing of culture before the Olmec tribes.
But even the Olmecs hadn't appeared until around 1000BC and that tells us how young their civilization is compared to the far east Asia ones. This clearly indicates that New America was never a good building ground for inhabitants after the cataclysmic event took place very long time ago.
edit on 11-7-2015 by chosonone because: (no reason given)

edit on 11-7-2015 by chosonone because: (no reason given)

edit on 11-7-2015 by chosonone because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 11 2015 @ 03:06 PM
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originally posted by: chosonone

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: chosonone
a reply to: Harte

You stated "In fact, current thought is that what we refer to as "mongoloid" types actually arose in N. America and back-migrated."

Is there a source supporting your claim?

Brown mentions some of the evidence in this PDF.


What this means in terms of the evolution and dispersion of
people in the Asian region is unclear. At present the earliest people with
a generalised East Asian cranial morphology are probably found in the
Americas. Is it a possibility that migration across the Bearing Straits
went in two directions and the first morphological Mongoloids evolved
in the Americas?


Harte


That is the most pointless and endless ways to search for where Asians or Europeans or Africans first originated.
It could not have been America to have a race or ethnic group flourish and prosper a long ago because some catastrophic event took place here such as a devastating asteroid collision, polar shift or by some other causes. There's no significant remains of civilization or flourishing of culture before the Olmec tribes.
But even the Olmecs hadn't appeared until around 1000BC and that tells us how young their civilization is compared to the far east Asia ones. This clearly indicates that New America was never a good building ground for inhabitants after the cataclysmic event took place very long time ago.

I can see that, as usual, I'm wasting my time here.

Harte



posted on Jul, 11 2015 @ 08:15 PM
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a reply to: punkinworks10
Dam now that sounds like a journey and some story if true. I was never interested in such things but purely for the story aspect or time killing aspect, but it would be cool to read up what they wrote down of there journey, you would think if they wrote it down while for the emperor its still out there in some form.

There are pretty much claims or stories out there from every sail worthy nation or peoples who sailed to the new world or a place that could be described as the north and south Americas today pre Columbus. The vikings being one, but it would not surprise me if there were many others as well. In fact it wold not surprise me that if you go back into the far antiquity that they were quite aware of a lot more things and the world then we give them credit for.



posted on Jul, 11 2015 @ 09:46 PM
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a reply to: punkinworks10

Your assertion is that Japanese might have left petroglyphs on the rock found in SW of N. America, but where are the evidences that support Japanese or Taiwanese exploring New America in prehistoric times? Nowhere to be found, just some folks telling old stories whether true or not.
Most likely scenario of which Asian first landed and influenced much part of Native Indians were ancient Koreans. Their cultures have too many similarities like how they raise kids, customs, decorations, etc..
As more artifacts and ancient remains are being excavated in much part of Northern China and Korea, it's becoming more clear as who they were and how much influence they had in those regions. They were the closest located from Asia to NA in which enabled them to travel by feet when the two continents were probably connected in prehistoric times. Also many pyramids found in north-eastern part of China were once built by the Ancient Koreans (Gojoseon 2500BC ~ some historians date back pre 7500BC). There are ancient scrolls, dolmens, old sword designs uniquely that of Koreans have been found all over in that region strongly supporting the evidence of their existence. It is this old kingdom I believe traveled to New America well before any other Asians left a foot print in New America. There are just too many cultural and custom resemblances between the two supporting the claim that New America was once actively visited by the ancient Koreans.



posted on Jul, 12 2015 @ 08:00 AM
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The strait reopened about 15,500 BP and by about 11,000 years BP the coastlines were close to their present configurations.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jul, 12 2015 @ 02:48 PM
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Did anyone else feel like the glyphs on the rock and their supposed matching symbols didn't really look all that much alike? Lol



posted on Jul, 12 2015 @ 11:38 PM
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This makes me think of the ancient Chinese anchors that have been found. Any connection? Or did that theory get debunked.



posted on Jul, 13 2015 @ 07:08 AM
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originally posted by: rollanotherone
This makes me think of the ancient Chinese anchors that have been found. Any connection? Or did that theory get debunked.


To debunk something, it first needs to be accepted. The Chinese stone anchors all turned out to be local to the area.



posted on Aug, 1 2015 @ 01:15 AM
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originally posted by: admirethedistance

originally posted by: AlexJowls
The Chinese discovered most everything before the West did

That's not even remotely true...

Read up on your non U.S. government, state sanctioned history a bit and then get back to me.



posted on Aug, 1 2015 @ 10:13 AM
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originally posted by: AlexJowls

originally posted by: admirethedistance

originally posted by: AlexJowls
The Chinese discovered most everything before the West did

That's not even remotely true...

Read up on your non U.S. government, state sanctioned history a bit and then get back to me.

Translation:


Buy and read yet another utterly unqualified pseudohistorian's book full of flights of fancy.


Harte



posted on Aug, 1 2015 @ 01:40 PM
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a reply to: AlexJowls

Here in Virginia we are taught about many Chinese and oriental inventions. It is the prevailing historical orthodoxy (and common public knowledge) that many inventions and innovations came from the far east. I get the feeling that you are conjuring up a non-existent problem to feel like you're locking horns with "the man", but if you have any specific example or text you would like to share we are all ears.

I am certainly open to the idea of east Asians having reached the Americas before Columbus, for instance.
edit on 1/8/2015 by atomadelica because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 1 2015 @ 03:59 PM
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originally posted by: atomadelica
a reply to: AlexJowls

Here in Virginia we are taught about many Chinese and oriental inventions. It is the prevailing historical orthodoxy (and common public knowledge) that many inventions and innovations came from the far east. I get the feeling that you are conjuring up a non-existent problem to feel like you're locking horns with "the man", but if you have any specific example or text you would like to share we are all ears.

I am certainly open to the idea of east Asians having reached the Americas before Columbus, for instance.

The first humans to walk in the Western Hemisphere would certainly be called east Asians.

Harte



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 09:45 AM
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originally posted by: atomadelica
a reply to: AlexJowls

Before the fall of Yonle dynasty, in the early part of the 15th century, the Chinese and their famed 'treasure fleets' were sailing the east shores of Africa, trading with locals and making a literal mockery of the Spanish and their comparative minuscule maritime vessels and wares on offer. It wasn't until the Confucian eunuchs (i.e., religion) came to power with the succession of the Ming dynasty, that they scuttled their fleets and closed the borders; effectively losing centuries of development through stagnation, in-fighting, colonialism, and finally, communism.

Recommended viewing: James Burke Connections³



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 09:56 AM
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originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: atomadelica
a reply to: AlexJowls

Here in Virginia we are taught about many Chinese and oriental inventions. It is the prevailing historical orthodoxy (and common public knowledge) that many inventions and innovations came from the far east. I get the feeling that you are conjuring up a non-existent problem to feel like you're locking horns with "the man", but if you have any specific example or text you would like to share we are all ears.

I am certainly open to the idea of east Asians having reached the Americas before Columbus, for instance.

The first humans to walk in the Western Hemisphere would certainly be called east Asians.

Harte

Siberian is not east Asian, and the east Asian phenotype, as exampled by the Han Chinese did not exist as a population at the time of the peopling of the new world. In fact that east Asian phenotype likely evolved in north America and back migrated to asia in the early-mid Holocene and maybe even in the terminal Pleistocene.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 04:10 PM
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originally posted by: punkinworks10

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: atomadelica
a reply to: AlexJowls

Here in Virginia we are taught about many Chinese and oriental inventions. It is the prevailing historical orthodoxy (and common public knowledge) that many inventions and innovations came from the far east. I get the feeling that you are conjuring up a non-existent problem to feel like you're locking horns with "the man", but if you have any specific example or text you would like to share we are all ears.

I am certainly open to the idea of east Asians having reached the Americas before Columbus, for instance.

The first humans to walk in the Western Hemisphere would certainly be called east Asians.

Harte

Siberian is not east Asian, and the east Asian phenotype, as exampled by the Han Chinese did not exist as a population at the time of the peopling of the new world. In fact that east Asian phenotype likely evolved in north America and back migrated to asia in the early-mid Holocene and maybe even in the terminal Pleistocene.

Take it literally.

What is the easternmost point of Asia?

I didn't say it was particularly funny.

Harte



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 04:57 PM
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originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: punkinworks10

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: atomadelica
a reply to: AlexJowls

Here in Virginia we are taught about many Chinese and oriental inventions. It is the prevailing historical orthodoxy (and common public knowledge) that many inventions and innovations came from the far east. I get the feeling that you are conjuring up a non-existent problem to feel like you're locking horns with "the man", but if you have any specific example or text you would like to share we are all ears.

I am certainly open to the idea of east Asians having reached the Americas before Columbus, for instance.

The first humans to walk in the Western Hemisphere would certainly be called east Asians.

Harte

Siberian is not east Asian, and the east Asian phenotype, as exampled by the Han Chinese did not exist as a population at the time of the peopling of the new world. In fact that east Asian phenotype likely evolved in north America and back migrated to asia in the early-mid Holocene and maybe even in the terminal Pleistocene.

Take it literally.

What is the easternmost point of Asia?

I didn't say it was particularly funny.

Harte


ok, you got me,
But, I must qualify my statement, by Siberian, I meant ancient west Eurasians(altains) that were a forerunner to some native americans, and not Siberian as in the modern concept of an east Asian of the east Asian phenotype.
And when I say east Asian I mean a geographic concept, as in ,yes, the eastern most part of asia is in fact in Siberia, but was not populated by east Asians, as I stated previously, as they had not arrived yet at the time of the peopling of the Americas.
Now I've made my own brain hurt.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 05:02 PM
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a reply to: punkinworks10
And recent work shows that the east Asian phenotype didn't make it to the Altai, until very recently, in the last 5-6k years.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 05:02 PM
link   

originally posted by: punkinworks10

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: punkinworks10

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: atomadelica
a reply to: AlexJowls

Here in Virginia we are taught about many Chinese and oriental inventions. It is the prevailing historical orthodoxy (and common public knowledge) that many inventions and innovations came from the far east. I get the feeling that you are conjuring up a non-existent problem to feel like you're locking horns with "the man", but if you have any specific example or text you would like to share we are all ears.

I am certainly open to the idea of east Asians having reached the Americas before Columbus, for instance.

The first humans to walk in the Western Hemisphere would certainly be called east Asians.

Harte

Siberian is not east Asian, and the east Asian phenotype, as exampled by the Han Chinese did not exist as a population at the time of the peopling of the new world. In fact that east Asian phenotype likely evolved in north America and back migrated to asia in the early-mid Holocene and maybe even in the terminal Pleistocene.

Take it literally.

What is the easternmost point of Asia?

I didn't say it was particularly funny.

Harte


ok, you got me,
But, I must qualify my statement, by Siberian, I meant ancient west Eurasians(altains) that were a forerunner to some native americans, and not Siberian as in the modern concept of an east Asian of the east Asian phenotype.
And when I say east Asian I mean a geographic concept, as in ,yes, the eastern most part of asia is in fact in Siberia, but was not populated by east Asians, as I stated previously, as they had not arrived yet at the time of the peopling of the Americas.
Now I've made my own brain hurt.


Just say Beringians.
10,000 years of occupation is long enough to establish citizenship, I'd say.

Harte



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 05:10 PM
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a reply to: Harte
Ahh, but west beringia( Siberia) was uninhabitable for for most of that time, while east beringia( North America) was habitable, hence the berigian standstill, they couldn't go back east nor could they go south.

The berigian standstill is hoo ha, while the beringians were trapped in beringia, there were already people at the tip of south America(monte verde) and in the amazon(pedra furada and toca de tira peia) and new mexico( pendejo) and south Carolina(topper). The Dene are beringians yes but not all Native americans are.
Oh yah then there is the whole walking thing, the corridor could not have opened before 17 k years ago and would notr support life for another millennia or so.
All the while there are sophisticated sea going people on the west coast, by 14k years ago, whose material culture is spread all around the pacific from mexico to southern japan.


edit on p0000008k14812015Mon, 03 Aug 2015 17:14:18 -0500k by punkinworks10 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 06:28 PM
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Maybe they sailed down the coast.

Harte



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