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Ancient Chinese writing found on ancient stones in America

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posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 12:42 AM
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a reply to: aorAki
ok,i thought the cabbage tree was a yucca,i cant remember where I read it,i can accept that ehoa.
But dont call me a liar mate,I may be uneducated but im not a liar so show a bit of class ffs.
heres the link for the sweet potato en.wikipedia.org...

also,why is e-local not a credible source to you? I suppose that link is no good to you either eh?




posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 03:00 AM
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Lets not forget America imported thousands of Chinese labourers to work on the railroads, perhaps some of them did it?



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 04:21 AM
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I call BS. Many of the carvings "discovered" are in Petroglyph National Monument, and are neither new discoveries, nor ancient. There's something like 24,000 unique carvings at the petroglyphs, and almost none of them utilize any form of language; They're almost exclusively pictorial, and often quite abstract, so their meaning would have only been known to the indoviduals who carved them. They are also only 400-700 years old.

I live less than 6 miles away, and have hiked through the petroglyphs countless times.



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 11:44 AM
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a reply to: arpgme

Some of those characters look similar, but way too different in the details to be considered the same. At least, that's my opinion. A couple do seem right on, though, but I think is more than likely just a mathematically provable coincidence.



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 07:42 PM
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originally posted by: hiddenNZ

But dont call me a liar mate,I may be uneducated but im not a liar so show a bit of class ffs.


Sorry, I didn't realise you were so sensitive to being told that what you were saying was wrong. You commonly present incorrect information.


originally posted by: hiddenNZ
heres the link for the sweet potato en.wikipedia.org...

I suppose that link is no good to you either eh?



I was aware of the sweet potato South America connection, but I was more looking for information about the name 'kumara' for sweet potato, in South America.

At least Wikipedia provides links/sources for most pages, so there is the ability to follow up, but it's not academic and it's certainly not accepted as a credible source for any researcher worth their weight.

As far as elocal goes, it's a small-distribution rag with interesting stories, but it lacks on hard, verifiable evidence.



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 09:53 PM
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a reply to: aorAki
I have tried to find native American words for the sweet potato, but all I could come up with were the coastal Honduran words, batatas, betatas and axi . But there is an 18th century word from southern Kyushu, kara-umi.


edit on 10-7-2015 by punkinworks10 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 10:49 PM
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a reply to: aorAki
I was reading a book "Bones" by Eileen Dewar, it's about early American habitations, Kennewick man, the sites in south America and such.
In one chapter the author relates a "personal communication" with some researcher of Polynesian culture, said that there about a dozen south American plants found on Polynesian islands, but she didn't list them. Ahhhhh that's frustrating.
Those plants don't include the sweet potatoes or the bottle gourd.



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 10:59 PM
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originally posted by: olaru12
a reply to: arpgme

I have been to Petroglyph National Monument many times, there are 20,000 petroglyphs there, some are bound to look like Chinese characters. There are also a lot of recent fakes carved into the rocks as well, erotic and porn.

Still, could be Chinese explorers....idk



Maybe it was always a big bulletin board.....for whoever passed by.
edit on 10-7-2015 by Logarock because: n



posted on Jul, 10 2015 @ 11:55 PM
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originally posted by: arpgme
Here is my opinion. The Chinese created their characters from pictures. A picture of a dog, for example, became a quick-to-draw character/symbol of a dog over time. Maybe certain Native Americans did the same? If so, it wouldn't be surprising that certain ancient Chinese symbols/characters would look similar to the Native American symbols/characters since dogs look similar all around the world.

What do you think about this?

lololololololol

You're tryin' WAY to hard, bub. xD

Might as well face facts: The Chinese discovered most everything before the West did and will likely colonise it in the future. Read up on the Zhang He 'treasure fleets' of the 15th century and how they dwarfed anything the Europeans had, and have your mind blown about the BS history you've not been taught.

(NB: There's a very good reason history is not a compulsory subject in Western mushrooms' education curriculae, yet is extensively drummed into kids in Asia. Think about it. By and by you'll understand why...)



posted on Jul, 11 2015 @ 12:12 AM
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a reply to: aorAki

saying someones telling porkies is calling them a liar from where I stand,saying they are wrong is allgood,there is a difference eh.
I thought this was a good point from the wiki page
Dutch linguists and specialists in Amerindian languages Willem Adelaar and Pieter Muysken have suggested that two lexical items may be shared by Polynesian languages and language of South America. One is the name of the sweet potato, which was domesticated in the New World. Proto-Polynesian *kumala[19] (compare Easter Island kumara, Hawaiian ʻuala, Māori kumāra; apparent cognates outside Eastern Polynesian may be borrowed from Eastern Polynesian languages, calling Proto-Polynesian status and age into question) may be connected with Quechua and Aymara k’umar ~ k’umara.



posted on Jul, 11 2015 @ 12:19 AM
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originally posted by: AlexJowls
The Chinese discovered most everything before the West did

That's not even remotely true...



posted on Jul, 11 2015 @ 12:41 AM
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a reply to: admirethedistance

Another 1421 fan, I fear. These people read one book and then it's "all your history is BS!" This from people who never cracked the covers of a history book since high school.



posted on Jul, 11 2015 @ 08:48 AM
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originally posted by: punkinworks10
I had a class in collage , in which , the professor had lecture about a document he came across I'm Japan while doing doctoral work.
The document related a journey by Buddhist monks, in the 11th century, to a faraway land.. When they left Japan they sailed north (land on left sunrise on right) until they got to a stormy and cold sea enshrouded in fog. At some point they realized both the land and sunrise were on their left(sailing south).
Many days passed as they sailed past treacherous forested coastlines , that afforded no harbor, when they nearly starving the terrain changed to wide beaches with occasional rivers flowing into the sea.
After a couple weeks the terrain became dry and hot, and then one morning the sun rose on the right, and the coast on the left(they were sailing north again in the sea of Cortez).
They made their way into a vast delta and up a big river , where they were blocked by a cataract.
Their was a villiage of native here and they stayed a year or so and explored upriver with their native guides until they came upon rival territory.
Since they were unable to convert the locals they left a sailed back the way they came, but a few individuals stayed behind .
When they returned their story was written down as they told it to the emperor.
So , I think it's probable but the bar of evidence is very high.

I find this story to be much more fascinating and plausible than the OP! If you or anyone else can track down the paper/studies of your old professor, i encourage you to create a new thread about it. I'd thoroughly enjoy reading through all of it.
edit on 7112015 by M4nWithNoN4me because:



posted on Jul, 11 2015 @ 10:01 AM
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New america was inhabited first not by the Chinese, nor Japanese but in fact it was the Koreans that share many similarities between them.
There's a strong evidence that the ancient Korea (goguryeo 고구려) empire had given knowledges and influenced culture to many native Indians.
Around the time of old Joseon (gojoseon 고조선) ~ 2500BC it seems probable that the ancient Koreans had immigrated to New America by land or the sea.
What's more interesting is that the Chinese characters you see on the rocks may more likely have been recorded by the ancient Koreans whom also at the time wrote fully in Chinese forms of characters with only minor differences.
For example Mexicans also a part bloodline of American Indians had much of their culture brought on by the ancient Koreans. Mexico before the Spaniards came to conquest their land, Spainards named the country Mexico with full x pronounciation but still to this day Mexico is pronounced Mec-hico by their own people.
This is because the ancient Koreans called themselves -Maek tribes. Maek's place in Korean is translated to Maek-yi-gote (맥이의곳) and thus the origin of settlers in Mexico may have came from the ancient far easterners.
I have more astonishing evidences that historians have found in regards to how these two dress and ornaments resemble much the same way as each other.
edit on 11-7-2015 by chosonone because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 11 2015 @ 10:29 AM
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originally posted by: chosonone
New america was inhabited first not by the Chinese, nor Japanese but in fact it was the Koreans that share many similarities between them.
There's a strong evidence that the ancient Korea (goguryeo 고구려) empire had given knowledges and influenced culture to many native Indians.
Around the time of old Joseon (gojoseon 고조선) ~ 2500BC it seems probable that the ancient Koreans had immigrated to New America by land or the sea.
What's more interesting is that the Chinese characters you see on the rocks may more likely have been recorded by the ancient Koreans whom also at the time wrote fully in Chinese forms of characters with only minor differences.
For example Mexicans also a part bloodline of American Indians had much of their culture brought on by the ancient Koreans. Mexico before the Spaniards came to conquest their land, Spainards named the country Mexico with full x pronounciation but still to this day Mexico is pronounced Mec-hico by their own people.
This is because the ancient Koreans called themselves Mec-yi settlers. Mec-yi place in Korean is translated to Mec-yi-gote (멕이의곳) and thus the origin of settlers in Mexico may have came from the ancient far easterners.
I have more astonishing evidences that historians have found in regards to how these two dress and ornaments resemble much the same way as each other.


Evidence, rather than belief ?



posted on Jul, 11 2015 @ 10:32 AM
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originally posted by: chosonone
New america was inhabited first not by the Chinese, nor Japanese but in fact it was the Koreans that share many similarities between them.


Um...

There were no Koreans 16,000 years ago.

In fact, current thought is that what we refer to as "mongoloid" types actually arose in N. America and back-migrated.

Last I read, anyway.

Harte



posted on Jul, 11 2015 @ 10:44 AM
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Another related book on the subject:


With the release of the book, The Island of Seven Cities in May of 2006, author Paul Chiasson has proposed a radical new theory of the history of the eastern seaboard of Canada. Using aerial photography and onsite photographs along with a unique interpretation of conventional history Mr. Chiasson suggests that over 600 years ago Chinese settlers established a flourishing city on a remote mountaintop, over looking the Atlantic Ocean at Cape Dauphin on the Island of Cape Breton. He also proposes that Cape Breton is the location of the legendary Island of Seven Cities.


Professionals familiar with the Cape Dauphin site have both read and reviewed the information in this new book. For my part I am the Crown Lands Forester for this area and am familiar with the evidences Mr. Chiasson offers in his book.

A summary of the physical evidence that Mr. Chiasson offers in his book to support his claim that the ruins of an ancient Chinese city exists at Cape Dauphin is as follows:


www.1421exposed.com...

(follow the link for more)

I’m not so certain about this, so don’t put me on the ‘believer’ camp. There are, however, some interesting facts that had me reading the book front to back.
edit on 11/7/15 by masqua because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 11 2015 @ 10:47 AM
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a reply to: Marduk

It's not in English but provides some evidence here
blog.daum.net...



posted on Jul, 11 2015 @ 10:50 AM
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a reply to: Harte

You stated "In fact, current thought is that what we refer to as "mongoloid" types actually arose in N. America and back-migrated."

Is there a source supporting your claim?
edit on 11-7-2015 by chosonone because: (no reason given)

edit on 11-7-2015 by chosonone because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 11 2015 @ 11:21 AM
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originally posted by: chosonone
a reply to: Harte

You stated "In fact, current thought is that what we refer to as "mongoloid" types actually arose in N. America and back-migrated."

Is there a source supporting your claim?

Brown mentions some of the evidence in this PDF.


What this means in terms of the evolution and dispersion of
people in the Asian region is unclear. At present the earliest people with
a generalised East Asian cranial morphology are probably found in the
Americas. Is it a possibility that migration across the Bearing Straits
went in two directions and the first morphological Mongoloids evolved
in the Americas?


Harte




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