It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The Thought That Counts

page: 1
10
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 07:51 AM
link   
Intention matters. Effort counts.

And regardless whether plans reach fruition, the amount of time and energy you put into a project has a direct correlation with the amount of spiritual merit you receive. The magnitude of positive intentions you place into an act produces the celestial reward--seeing the results of the act itself is simply the cherry sitting atop that cosmic cake.

In other words, simply intending commit some positive deed (then following through on that act) is enough to bear karmic fruit.

The point of all this?

Far too many remain fixated with completing the act itself, and much too frequently grow frustrated if their plans go awry.

I know a couple who bickers constantly but still occasionally reaches out to do nice things for each other. Not long ago the woman was out walking when a sudden rainshower broke out. The sky began vomiting up torrents of damp, and the man in that relationship decided drive to the park and rescue her.

For about a half-hour he went driving fruitlessly along those roads, but couldn't find her upon any of the visible trails.

Then, upon her return, they got into an argument because he went to all that trouble for (supposedly) nothing.

But what he failed understand is this: Even by attempting the good deed, he already earned his reward. By simply making the effort to go out driving in the rain, already he attained karmic benefit.

But to him, the act was a waste because he couldn't bring it to fruition. And that situation got me thinking:

Too many of us refrain from attempting kind actions because we fear failure. Too many of us stifle our positive potential because we wrongly believe that we only accrue benefit if our attempt is a success.

This couldn't be more wrong.

Cosmic merit arises from positive intention. Celestial virtue accumulates from effort made. Simply by attempting a good deed with the right mindset, you reap the rewards regardless whether your attempt succeeds or fails.

In ancient Japan they understood this intuitively. There they never measured the worth of an action by whether the deed succeeded or failed, but rather judged its merit by the poise, the grace, the intention, and execution of the one performing the act.

In feudal Kyudo (Japanese Archery), for instance, whether the shot hits or misses the mark is largely irrelevant compared against the amount of correct effort the archer displays.

This is something we should all remember on a daily basis. Success or failure is essentially meaningless compared against the effort and intentions you put into a deed.

Thus released from the compulsion of needing constantly fret whether your good deed will "pay off," you stand liberated and free to attempt innumerable positive acts without once fearing failure. And you gain the ability to birth that much more joy into the world.

So keep that well in mind. Tuck that near to heart: Never worry about whether you can bring any deed to completion. Never fret over whether you can finish a beneficent undertaking.

Just get up each day and try your best. Go forth and show the world what you're worth.

And remember always: By and large, it's the thought that counts.




edit on 9-7-2015 by Trachel because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 08:25 AM
link   
a reply to: Trachel


The magnitude of positive intentions you place into an act produces the celestial reward--seeing the results of the act itself is simply the cherry sitting atop that cosmic cake.

Sorry delusional thinking. Or an excuse to not actually have to lend a hand.

I have become aware of this recently. My mom suffered a stroke earlier this year.

My mom is religious, attended church regular. This church has people she calls friends who have emailed and called the house incessantly to pray for her, they have prayer meetings, pray for her good health, send her emails, pray, pray, pray…

but really I muse, not one of them has offered to come over and actually lend a hand. The burden of responsibility for her care, doctor appointments, house chores, shopping, cooking, cleaning, maintenance, is on my shoulders, but her church friends just pray.

I think some people use this as an excuse to not help people in need.

Its not what we think that matters so much as what we do.



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 08:28 AM
link   
a reply to: Trachel

Following that logic, 'it's the thought that counts' , cosmically, omits the fact that it doesn't do much good in the physical realm.

'Dones', completed acts, puts a roof over your head, food on the table, and a functioning society that we all enjoy the benefits of.

That, I suspect, is far more valuable cosmically......



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 08:50 AM
link   
I guess trying your best is really all we can do, but if you're not distinguishing you success from your failures you're doing yourself a disservice. Focus your strength on succeeding for the right reasons and if you fail you'll at least be righteous in your efforts, but I think that's what you meant anyway.
edit on 9-7-2015 by rexsblues because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 08:51 AM
link   
He is not saying that we should have good intentions and not act on them, he is saying we should have good intentions and act on them but beyond that whatever happens is not really under your control. Like a Muslim would say: "Allah ghaleb" (it's the responsibility of god).



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 08:52 AM
link   
a reply to: nwtrucker

For sure it's important to see deeds through to fruition. But wrongly believing that only completed deeds are worthy of merit keep people from attempting things of truly great magnitude.

It's only when you detach from winning and losing that attempts at performing good deeds grows infinite, and from those strings of attempts--success becomes inevitable.



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 08:52 AM
link   

originally posted by: gosseyn
He is not saying that we should have good intentions and not act on them, he is saying we should have good intentions and act on them but beyond that whatever happens is not really under your control. Like a Muslim would say: "Allah ghaleb" (it's the responsibility of god).


Exactly right--thanks much for clarifying the point!




posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 08:55 AM
link   
a reply to: intrptr

On the contrary, the philosophy I espoused above would have those individuals attempting to lend a hand regardless of whether they thought their deeds would succeed.

I'm a huge believer in manifesting the act into reality--I just don't allow myself to fixate upon the final result. (In other words, if I try doing something nice that backfires, I don't get too worked up about it, and it doesn't stop me from constantly trying again).

So yeah, I'd preach that all those people should've been lending a hand from the beginning. And if that worked out badly for them for whatever reason, they should still try-try again.

Hope that clarifies!



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 09:03 AM
link   
Yeah, I noticed I kind of interpreted that wrong, my bad. I revised my 1st.



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 09:08 AM
link   
a reply to: rexsblues

For sure you should distinguish success from failure after the fact. Doing so lets you recalibrate your approach so next time you can improve your performance.

I'm just saying that while in the moment of a good deed (or while planning one), you can't get bogged down and paralyzed with dark delusions of impending disaster. And after the dust settles, you can't beat yourself up too hard if you tried your best.



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 09:10 AM
link   

originally posted by: rexsblues
Yeah, I noticed I kind of interpreted that wrong, my bad. I revised my 1st.


No problem, I do that all the time!



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 09:13 AM
link   

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: Trachel


The magnitude of positive intentions you place into an act produces the celestial reward--seeing the results of the act itself is simply the cherry sitting atop that cosmic cake.

Sorry delusional thinking. Or an excuse to not actually have to lend a hand.

I have become aware of this recently. My mom suffered a stroke earlier this year.

My mom is religious, attended church regular. This church has people she calls friends who have emailed and called the house incessantly to pray for her, they have prayer meetings, pray for her good health, send her emails, pray, pray, pray…

but really I muse, not one of them has offered to come over and actually lend a hand. The burden of responsibility for her care, doctor appointments, house chores, shopping, cooking, cleaning, maintenance, is on my shoulders, but her church friends just pray.

I think some people use this as an excuse to not help people in need.

Its not what we think that matters so much as what we do.

Off Topic a little, but I'm going to give you an AMEN! I've seen what you describe so many times. Too many to count.
On Topic: If those people followed the OP's line of thought. They'd be putting action behind those prayers.
edit on 7/9/2015 by Klassified because: clarity



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 09:14 AM
link   
a reply to: Trachel

I think it's your example that throws off the conclusion you point out.

That couple are, as you say, bickers...
. They have another game they are playing with each other that has nothing to do with that particular situation..


Thought and act....in between lies persistence, the effort to bring the thought to fruition.

The thought was a good one, has it's merits, cosmically, and points to the relative health of that soul. His persistence in overcoming the barriers that blocked he efforts speaks to the strength of that soul. Which also merit validation.

He may not have recognized, as you say, the merit of the thought, itself, or he might also recognize the obviousness of that 'merit' and considered it beneath mention.

Better still that he had found her. I'd place that as the highest of 'merit' of all three. Thought, persistence and fruition.



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 09:17 AM
link   
Is it truly the thought that counts, though? I agree with you for the most part, but what about the saying 'the road to Hell is paved with good intentions?



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 09:17 AM
link   

originally posted by: nwtrucker

Better still that he had found her. I'd place that as the highest of 'merit' of all three. Thought, persistence and fruition.



For sure, yes. I agree with your completely--effectuating the rescue would've been the best outcome.

But he got angry over the failure because he considered the effort wasted time. That was his big mistake that led me to revelation--because the effort itself was still a significant act of good will.



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 09:18 AM
link   
a reply to: Trachel

Good day Trachel. MS here...very well put together thread. I agree with you wholeheartedly.

Some folks fail to realize that even a small amount of effort counts, even if one is unsuccessful completing it. Karma friend...you made the perfect comparison-definition of the word.

Personally, Ive been newly employed by my local city government and...still being a Emergency Med Tech and 1st Responder in Life Support...that has taken a backseat to working with Seniors and the handicapped as my day to day job.

You've stressed my philosophy in assisting others..as best I can, how I can and when I can. It doesn't matter how small...its the effort put into it.

I try to help at least one person with something...even seemingly insignificant...every day. I try to not be too hard on myself either when I make mistakes (as we all do)...and I try to learn at least one new thing each day...no matter how small.

These 3 things keep me grounded, and I live by the Lennon-McCartney lyrics: "And In the End...the Love you take...is equal to the Love...you(we) make". Even just the effort...carries over at the end of our lives.

Thanks T! Best Mysterioustranger



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 09:19 AM
link   

originally posted by: 5leepingWarrior
Is it truly the thought that counts, though? I agree with you for the most part, but what about the saying 'the road to Hell is paved with good intentions?


Good point. Thoughtless intentions that result in predictable adverse consequences should be avoided.

IMO, part of the process of "intention" is thinking through your actions to determine the probable result. That way you can avoid intentions that would lead to undesirable outcomes (but you still can't obviate entirely the potential for an otherwise thoughtful good deed to fail).



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 09:20 AM
link   

originally posted by: TrachelFor sure you should distinguish success from failure after the fact. Doing so lets you recalibrate your approach so next time you can improve your performance.


You're spot on, because that's exactly what just happened to me.



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 09:21 AM
link   

originally posted by: mysterioustranger
I try to help at least one person with something...even seemingly insignificant...every day. I try to not be too hard on myself either when I make mistakes (as we all do)...and I try to learn at least one new thing each day...no matter how small.


Love your entire post, but this part resonated the strongest.

If everyone lived by that philosophy--at least one helpful act per day--we'd be living in a far different world. It's so simple yet a disappointing bulk of the population never makes the effort.

Thanks for being part of the solution!



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 09:24 AM
link   
a reply to: Trachel

MAXIMUM MOTIVATION + MINIMUM EXPECTATIONS = MAXIMUM HAPPINESS
www.abovetopsecret.com...



new topics

top topics



 
10
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join