It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Remote viewing & UFOs : Stargate, Galactic Federation + the Aviary (CIA index + 92,010 PDF pages)

page: 4
294
<< 1  2  3    5  6  7 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 01:38 PM
link   
More recently, Vallee has been a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for National Institute for Discovey Science (“NIDS”), established by the controversial Robert Bigelow (see Section H11 below).

Vallee is included in some online lists of alleged members of the Aviary, including an article by Richard Boylan entitled “Birds of a Feather No Longer” which suggests that Vallee may have been known as “Partridge” in the Aviary and an article by “Brother Blue” which suggests Vallee was known as “Parrot” in the Aviary. (Some of the discussions of the Aviary seem to focus more on listing bird names than seeking to establish basic facts about the interactions between members of the Aviary…).

Vallee continues to be involved in UFO research, largely behind the scenes.

edit on 8-7-2015 by IsaacKoi because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 01:39 PM
link   

Section H2 : Hal Puthoff (SRI, “Aviary”, UFO Working Group)



Harold Puthoff, generally known as Hal Puthoff is an extremely well know figure within the remote viewing community. He was one of the pioneers in the field, particularly with his work on remote viewing at SRI in the 1970s.

Hal Puthoff feaures in many of the remote viewing documentaries mentioned in this thread. He can also be seen discussing in the video embedded below:



Puthoff is less well known for some of his interesting connections with ufology. For example, Puthoff had some recent involvement (with the infamous Richard Doty and others) in relation to the SERPO hoax. The nature of Puthoff’s involvement in relation to the SERPO hoax is a matter of some controversy.

Puthoff’s interest in UFOs, and links to members of the UFO community, go back several decades.

The most extensive account of that involvement that I have seen is in Jacque Vallee’s personal journal.

As discussed in relation to Jacques Vallee (see Section H1 above), the first two volumes of Vallee’s personal journals (i.e. Jacques Vallee’s books “Forbidden Science” Volumes 1 and 2) refer to Hal Puthoff a few dozen times, including mentioned how Vallee met him at a lecture Vallee gave at the Palo Alto Research Group and Puthoff invited Valllee to Puthoff’s lab. More interesting to me personally are the various entries in Vallee’s journals to discussions with Puthoff regarding UFOs. Those entries include one for 7 October 1972 about Puthoff mentioning that a former colleague of Puthoff at the NSA had told Puthoff that a fresh study of UFOs was secretly under way in the government. An entry for the following week (on 15 October 1972) refers to a discussion between Vallee and Puthoff about Puthoff’s “Washington contacts”. Vallee commented in his journal that “the risk in approaching them is to get caught in weird games; I will have to stay on my guard”. Puthoff subsequently put Vallee in touch with Howell McConnell (an individual at the NSA that I will eventually cover in a long thread about the NSA and UFOs…). An entry for 21 February 1973 notes that Puthoff had come back from a trip to Washington and had spoken to (unnamed) Government officials in a position to discover the true state of affairs” about UFOs. Vallee states that they told Puthoff that people who recently saw strange objects in the sky in the Southwest had only been watching classified prototypes. However, they reportedly also conceded to Puthoff that there were “true” saucers. Puthoff told Vallee that his high-level contacts walked around with UFO books in their briefcases, particularly Vallee’s books. Vallee stated in his journal that he found this “depressing”, commenting “Doesn't that imply that they know less than I do?”. Entries for 2 November 1973 and 17 November 1973 both record claims by Puthoff that he had identified the leader of a CIA group that monitored the UFO field.
edit on 8-7-2015 by IsaacKoi because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 01:39 PM
link   
Hal Puthoff is referred to in several of the sections above, including in:

(1) Section F5 above on the remote viewing document released by the CIA about remote viewing Mars 1 million years BC, in relation to which Skip Atwater stated that the relevant geographic coordinates of some allegedly unusual formations on the planet Mars had been supplied by Hal Puthoff several years earlier.

(2) Section G1 and Section G2 above on Pat Price’s claims that he remote viewed alien bases on Earth, in relation to which Skip Atwater has stated that Pat Price’s file of relevant material was given to Atwater by Hal Puthoff.

(3) Section G4 above on Uri Geller, in relation to whom Jacques Vallee’s personal journal records that Hal Puthoff mentioned to Vallee in 1972 a forthcoming experiment with Uri Geller and proposed that Vallee scan the sky in case something usual showed up. An entry in those journals for 12 November 1972 records that Vallee did watch a cloud-covered sky on a day when Geller was being tested at SRI, but Vallee only noted a few airplanes and bird but no anomaly. Upon Geller’s instruction, Puthoff subsequently told Puthoff about Geller’s claims to have seen UFOs and to have been contacted by their occupants, with Geller believing that he had been chosen to demonstrate certain powers (see the entry for 20 November 1972).


Hal Puthoff is also referred to:

(1) In relation to John Alexander and the UFO Working Group, in Section H5 below. Hal Puthoff has been named (e.g. by Tim Good in Chapter 22 of his book “Need to Know”) as an attendee of the UFO Working Group meetings.

(2) In relation to Robert Bigelow and NIDS, in Section H11 below.

edit on 8-7-2015 by IsaacKoi because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 01:40 PM
link   
In 1996, according to John Alexander (see Section H5 below) in his book “UFOs – Myths, Conspiracies and Realities”, Hal Puthoff was involved in at least two multi-day discussions with Corso regarding the claims made in Corso’s highly controversial book “The Day After Roswell”. The relevant discussions took place in March 1996 in Stuart, Florida (with John Alexander and George Knapp) and in April 1996 in Las Vegas (with Robert Bigelow and Jacques Vallee).

John Alexander’s book also refers, without giving any relevant dates, to a meeting arranged by Bill

Moore that Alexander attended with Hal Puthoff, Scott Jones and a source that claimed to have been involved in an official UFO project when he was in the US Air Force involving claims of induction into the program at an underground facility at Los Alamos. The source allegedly describing a facility which John Alexander knew “pretty well”, with Alexander stating that “I knew that there were no underground bunkers in that facility”. John Alexander does not name the source, but the relevant claims and the connection to Bill Moore suggest the possibility that the relevant individual was Richard Doty.

John Alexander also mentions in his book that Hal Puthoff was assigned the name “Partridge” in the Aviary, although he was not sure of his recollection since “it was not terribly important at the time”. Robert Collins has, in his book “Exempt from Disclosure”, also stated that Hal Puthoff was “Patridge” in the Aviary. Armen Victorian wrote an article for the Nexus Magzine for October-November 1993 (i.e. Volume 2 Number 16) which discussed the Aviary, naming (at page 15) Harold Puthoff as “Owl” in the Aviary. While John Alexander states that “the vast majority of the material on the Internet concerning the mystical Aviary is simply amusing”, he does confirm that he attended a meeting with Hal Puthoff, Scott Jones, Bill Moore and Jamie Shandera in Dayton, Ohio. He says it was “really quite mundane” but does not give details of the date, purpose or content of the discussions. Bob Collins, in his controversial book “Exempt from Disclosure”, states the following about a meeting involving Hal Puthoff in the fall of 1987:



Ernie Kellerstrass had Bill Moore, Jaime Shandera, Hal Puthoff, Col. John Alexander … Scott Jones (assistant for Senator Pell), and me over to his house in Beavercreek, OH (suburb of Dayton, OH) for dinner. … During the dinner and afterwards many of the conversations went non-stop involving such topics as Area 51 in Nevada where purportedly there was an ET base according to Ernie. … So went the conversations in the ensuing months and years…


Bob Collins also stated in that book that, in April 1989, he attended a “mini-summit” with Kit Green, Hal Puthoff, Rick Doty, Bill Moore and Jaime Shandera in April 1989 in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at a motel. He claims that “This meeting dealt with the aftershocks from the “UFO Cover-Up Live” show and how to proceed with the new sources” and that “Kit Green took center stage by proposing several lines of attack involving disclosure strategies”.

In 2005, Hal Puthoff co-authored a paper entitled “Inflation-Theory Implications for Extraterrestrial Visitation” published in (with Jim Deardorff, Haisch and Bruce Maccabee). That paper concluded as follows:



Despite the UFO phenomenon having continued now for over two generations, the huge technological head start of the presumed ETs would still come as a great shock to many scientists as well as citizenry, as the Brookings Report indicated. It could be so great as to seriously challenge our consensual reality, a not insignificant danger. The implication that we would be powerless relative to their presumed capabilities and evolutionary advantage may be most unwelcome, with it being no surprise that science would have difficulty coming to terms with the situation. Nevertheless, the reality of the phenomenon and of our having long since been discovered by advanced ETs now may be more probable than that Fermi’s paradox is to be resolved through either the non-existence of advanced ETs or their inability to explore or colonise the galaxy. Hence open scientific research on the subject is needed with special attention paid to high quality UFO reports exhibiting apparent indications that ET intelligence and strategy are involved.



Hal Puthoff was a member of the “Team of Five” (i.e. Richard Doty, Harold Puthoff, Kit Green, Victor Martinez and Bill Ryan) in relation to the Serpo hoax. (Rick Doty is commonly regarded within the UFO community as the author, or at least a co-author, of the hoaxed Serpo material). I think many people that have not looked into the Serpo fiasco would be surprised to hear that Harold Puthoff worked together with the infamous Rick Doty in relation to anything (particularly the Serpo hoax). The nature of the involvement of the Team of Five in relation to the SERPO hoax is a matter of some controversy. Several UFO researchers have suggested that the Team of Five were behind the Serpo hoax (pointing to, in particular, evidence that Doty was clearly involved in hoaxing relevant material and leaked emails between members of the Team of Five), while some of the Team of Five have claimed that they were only investigating the Serpo hoax. These controversies were discussed in various items online, particularly in material on Shawnna Connolly’s serpo.info website, in Part 9 of the Reality Uncovered’s website “Project Serpo Investigation” and in various threads here on ATS (particularly in a thread started by Shawnna Connolly in 2006 entitled “Project Serpo blown wide open - exclusive expose” and several more recent threads, including 1ofthe9’s thread “Mirage Men is Out” in 2014 and TheGut’s thread “The Men In Black(OPs) The Aviary & UFOs” in 2012.



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 01:41 PM
link   
Unsurprisingly, Hal Puthoff features at some length in many remote viewing books and some UFO books. Relevant discussions include those by:

(1) Jim Schnabel in in his book “Remote Viewers : The Secret History of America’s Psychic Spies” (1997) at pages 82 (in Chapter 5), 85-89, 96-97 (in Chapter 6), 99-112 (in Chapter 7), 117-122, 124-128 (in Chapter 8), 129-131, 134-139 (in Chapter 9), 141-143, 147-156 (in Chapter 10), 157, 159-162, 168-169 (in Chapter 11), 170-172, 174-175 (in Chapter 12), 182, 190-192 (in Chapter 13), 194-200, 203-210 (in Chapter 14), 215-227 (in Chapter 15), 231-241, 243, 253-256 (in Chapter 16), 257-258, 261-264 (in Chapter 17), 272, 283 (in Chapter 18), 320-323 (in Chapter 20), 357, 367 (in Chapter 22) of the Dell paperback edition.

(2) David Marks in his “The Psychology of the Psychic: Second Edition” (2000) at pages 30, 31-71, 124-125, 167-187 of the Prometheus Books softcover edition.

(3) Paul Smith in his book “Reading the Enemy’s Mind” (2005) at pages 54-55, 57-67, 70-75, 84-85, 86, 155, 175, 192-193, 195-196, 270 of the Forge hardback edition

(4) Ronald McRae in his book “Mind Wars: The true story of government research into the military potential of psychic weapons” (1984) at pages 5, 22, 29, 80-84, 92-113 of the St Martin’s Press hardback edition.

(5) Jim Marrs in his book “PSI Spies: The True Story of America’s Psychic Warfare Program” (2007) at pages 84-94 (in Chapter 3), 102, 104, 105, 107, 110-111 (in Chapter 4), 241, 244, 245 (in Chapter 9), 280 (in the Epilogue) of the New Page Books softcover edition.

(6) Dale Graff in his book “Tracks in the Psychic Wilderness: An exploration of ESP, Remote Viewing, Precognitive Dreaming and Synchronicity” (1998) at pages 4 (in the unnumbered introductory chapter entitled “Stargate – A Personal View”), 26, 30 (in Chapter 1), 31-32, 34, 36-39 (in Chapter 2), 49-50, 53-55 (in Chapter 4), 96, 98, 102-103 (in Chapter 9) of the Vega softcover edition.


For further book references, see the table I compiled at this link.


Some further material in relation to Hal Puthoff is summarised on various websites, including on the Bibliotecapleyades website and the (sadly) defunct Ufomind website.



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 01:41 PM
link   

Section H3 : Kit Green (CIA, "Aviary", UFO Working Group)



Dr Christopher Green (generally known as “Kit Green”) worked for the CIA from 1969 until 1985. He was an analyst in the Science and Technology Division of the CIA. Kit Green’s work for the CIA has long been known to have included a role in relation to the CIA’s funding of remote viewing experiments at SRI by Hal Puthoff (see Section H2 above) and others. He has been referred to as having worked on the CIA’s “Weird Desk” and as the CIA’s “Keeper of the Weird”. Kit Green subsequently worked for General Motors.

Kit Green’s work at the CIA involved work in relation to both UFOs and remote viewing. He has had contact with researchers in both fields over the years, while working for the CIA and afterwards. In the interview with Ryan Dube in 2008, Kit Green mentioned that he “never spent more than 10%” of his time on matters pertaining to anything paranormal, but “it has resulted in 90% of what is thought to be known about me!”. Kit Green’s work on paranormal subjects while working for the CIA has led to him being referred to as the “Keeper of the Weird” and working on the CIA’s “Weird Desk”.

Phil Klass, in his “Skeptics UFO Newsletter” in September 1993 (SUN23) reported on lectures given by Bruce Maccabee to interested CIA employees at informal “brown-bag lunches” in 1979 onwards. The first invitation came from Kit Green. Later invitations came from Ron Pandolfi (see Section H4 below). Kit Green had reportedly told Bruce Maccabee that all of the UFO papers released by the CIA had come from his Directorate and Kit “Green speculated that there might be as many as 15,000 more UFO papers in the archives of other CIA Directorates”. The same article by Klass reported that Kit Green was asked whether he would be willing to testify in court that the CIA had thousands of additional pages of UFO documents, but Kit Green “declined on the grounds that he was only speculating” which “chilled Maccabee’s relations with Green who left CIA several years later”.

Bruce Maccabee’s recent book “The FBI CIA UFO Connection” (2014) included a discussion of these lectures to CIA employees. He states that “Kit seemed to treat the subject as something of medium importance, not very important but also not something to laugh about”. He contrasted that attitude with the one displayed by Ron Pandolfi : “Ron, on the other hand, seemed to treat it as a joke or an amusement, at least initially”. Bruce Maccabee states that he wondered for several years why the CIA was taking an interest in UFOs but “then, in 1990, Ron told me the official reason : the possibility of espionage”. Maccabbee reports that Pandolfi said that “in the 1970s, the CIA had obtained ‘firm evidence’ that the KGB had devised a plan to use US citizens, including ufologists, to penetrate US defense programs”.
edit on 8-7-2015 by IsaacKoi because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 01:42 PM
link   
Kit Green and Ron Pandolfi are mentioned in various (contradictory and generally almost incomprehensible) articles online in relation to a meeting with Air Force colonels Barry Hennessey and Richard Weaver following the infamous 1988 TV show "UFO Cover Up Live", presented by Mike Farrell. This is the show in which a supposed member of the intelligence community, "Falcon", revealed that the favourite snack of alien visitors to Earth is strawberry ice-cream - see 1 hour 15 minutes into the show, embedded below. Bill Moore appears a few times in the show, as does "Falcon" (i.e Richard Doty). The main section in which Moore discusses MJ-12 and his contacts with government agents is just after 1 hour 2 minutes into the show. There is a partial transcript of the show online here. I have collated references to discussion of this show in a couple of dozen UFO books are given in a table here. In his book “The FBI CIA UFO Connection” (2014), Bruce Maccabee states that the “possibility of unintentional espionage is the basic reason why Ron called two Air Force Colonels” (unnamed by Bruce Maccabee, but commonly named in articles online as Barry Hennessey and Richard Weaver) to the CIA “to testify regarding the claims made by ‘Falcon’ during the ‘UFO Cover-up?Live!’ TV show”. Bruce Maccabee reported that Ron Pandolfi “wanted to know if either of them was Bill Moore’s secret source, Falcon” and, if not, “he wanted to know what they knew about Falcon and about AFOSI Richard Doty”. Maccabee also reported that two years later, in November 1990, “Ron told me why he was so interested in Falcon and another person who was presumed to exist that was known only as ‘Number 1’”. Ron reportedly stated that the “top people (in the Agency) are assuming that #1 is a KGB spy who leaks names of real defense programs as (if they were clandestine) UFO programs” in the hope that ufologists would try to penetrate those programs and publicize secret technology.



Kit Green was named as co-organiser (along with John Alexander) of the UFO Working Group (see Section H5 below) by Ron Pandolfi in a recording telephone conversation with colourful character Armen Victorian, a small part of which was played at a UFO conference in Leeds in 1992 (at 44 minutes 30 seconds into Armen Victorian’s presentation). In the recorded conversation, Pandolfi discussed the Aviary and the UFO Working Group. Pandolfi stated that the first meeting of the UFO Working Group was organised by Kit Green and John Alexander but he didn’t remember how it evolved but Pandolfi left after the first meeting. (The relevant section is at 20 minutes 30 seconds into the recording of the relevant conversation).

Kit Green was briefly mentioned in Section H2 above (in relation to Hal Puthoff) since Kit Green was a member of the “Team of Five” (i.e. Richard Doty, Harold Puthoff, Kit Green, Victor Martinez and Bill Ryan) in relation to the Serpo hoax. (Rick Doty is commonly regarded within the UFO community as the author, or at least a co-author, of the hoaxed Serpo material). I think many people that have not looked into the Serpo fiasco would be surprised to hear that Kit Green worked together with the infamous Rick Doty in relation to anything (particularly the Serpo hoax). The nature of the involvement of the Team of Five in relation to the Serpo hoax is a matter of some controversy. Several UFO researchers have suggested that the Team of Five were behind the Serpo hoax (pointing to, in particular, evidence that Doty was clearly involved in hoaxing relevant material and leaked emails between members of the Team of Five), while some of the Team of Five have claimed that they were only investigating the Serpo hoax. These controversies were discussed in various items online, particularly in material on Shawnna Connolly’s serpo.info website, in Part 9 of the Reality Uncovered’s website “Project Serpo Investigation” and in various threads here on ATS (particularly in a thread started by Shawnna Connolly in 2006 entitled “Project Serpo blown wide open - exclusive expose” and several more recent threads, including 1ofthe9’s thread “Mirage Men is Out” in 2014 and TheGut’s thread “The Men In Black(OPs) The Aviary & UFOs” in 2012.
edit on 8-7-2015 by IsaacKoi because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 01:42 PM
link   
Kit Green was briefly mentioned in Section G1 above, in relation to Pat Price’s claims to have remote viewed alien bases on Earth. As mentioned in Section G1 above, many of you have probably seen the picture below showing (from left to right) Kit Green, Pat Price (see Section G1 above) and Hal Puthoff (see Section H2 above) smiling after a reportedly successful remote viewing experiment.



Russell Targ has also made available a similar photograph from 1974 showing (from left to right) Hal Puthoff (see Section H2 above), Russell Targ (see Section H14 below), Pat Price (see Section G1 above) and Kit Green.



The first of the above photographs appeared in Jim Schnabel's book "Remote Viewers", with Kit Green being referred in the relevant caption as “CIA scientist Richard Kennett”. “Richard Kennett” (i.e. Kit Green) is referred to on numerous pages of Jim Schnabel's "Remote Viewers", including: "Richard Kennett at the CIA believed that by promoting altered states, one made the brain more unstable, more prone to spontaneous hallucinations and delusions. One of Kenntt's reasons ... was that he had once had his own OBE..." (at pages 290-291).

Jim Schnabel refers in his book “Remote Viewers” to various very odd events reported by Kit Green (referred to in that book under the pseudonym “Richard Kennett”). Apart from being involved in various remote viewing experiments which apparently persuaded Kit Green that a real phenomenon existed, the experiences described in Jim Schnabel’s book include:

(1) An alleged incident involving Uri Geller, in which Geller interrupted a remote viewing experiment involving Kit Green being on the telephone. Geller suddenly claimed that something dramatic had just occurred in Kit Green’s house and that Geller said “I’ve got this terrible feeling of glass slivers and shards slicing through my body” and referred to a strange-looking dog with blood on his neck. Kit Green reportedly went to check and saw his bulldog, who wore a “blood-red macramé collar”, had knocked over a glass globe and shards of glass lay on the carpet (at pages 139-140). Kit Green himself told a very similar story (but referring repeatedly to “a RV subject” and “the RV person” rather than naming Uri Geller) in an interview with Ryan Dube in 2008. Kit Green referred to this incident when asked to describe “the strangest experience you had that had the greatest impact on your personal beliefs regarding paranormal phenomenon”

(2) An OBE (Out-of-Body Experience) allegedly experienced by Kit Green after using some tips picked up from one of Bob Monroe’s books. Kit Green reportedly “felt himself separating from his prone, sleeping form”, after which “some kind of goblin hobbled up, put its nose in his face, stared at him”, causing Kit Green to go back to his own body.
Another incident mentioned by Jim Schnabel also features in an entry in Jacques Vallee’s personal journal dated 23 March 1975. That entry in Vallee’s journal recorded the following:



A couple of weeks ago Kit met in Virginia with Russell in Hal's hotel room. They had started to discuss a case in which a mysterious mechanical arm appeared out of thin air in the bedroom of a Livermore engineer when the four of them suddenly heard a key turning in the door. Hal and Kit positioned themselves on either side and jumped on the intruder as soon as he pushed the door in, grabbing a little fellow with only one arm! The poor man swore he had been given the wrong key. They called the front desk. Indeed he had gone to the wrong room, but why did his key open Hal's door?


edit on 8-7-2015 by IsaacKoi because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 01:43 PM
link   
Jacques Vallee refers to Kit Green repeatedly in his published personal journals. Vallee’s journal entry for 11 February 1974 records a meeting he had with Kit Green, in which Kit Green apparently displayed more knowledge of the first case discussed (the Pascagoula case) than the experts that had claimed to analyse it. Vallee states that he most important thing he learned was that “Green had counterparts in every branch of the Executive” and they “mainly operated ‘out of personal interest’ with the blessing of higher-level managers”. Vallee further noted that “They occasionally exchanged data, but he claimed little was done with it”. Vallee asked Kit Green if they must be a secret effort somewhere, to which Kit Green finally agreed but stated that “in my group we’ve wondered if it wasn’t being run within private industry”. Vallee noted in his journal that he could not tell Hynek about the meeting with Kit Green of the CIA because Puthoff had placed Vallee under strict secrecy. Vallee subsequently had repeated contact with Kit Green regarding UFOs. Vallee’s journals contain more references to Kit Green than to, say, Hal Puthoff. Some of the relevant entries are rather interesting. For example, Vallee’s journals include an entry on 18 May 1974 referring to a meeting in which Kit Green reportedly said he had his people “looking deep within the Air Force and we can’t find anyone who’ll talk to us!”. Kit reportedly asked “Where do they hide the f##king project, if there’s one?”. A later entry (on 16 June 1974) refers to a meeting with Kit Green and other officials which “sounded exciting” to Vallee, until “we sat down in the bar area and I realized they were all space cadets, talking about pedestrian research worthy of the old NICAP”. Vallee referred to the discussions as “another waste of time”, although he wondered if it was “a fake research project as a cover for their newest gadgets. Another of the various entries relating to discussions with Kit Green, this time dated 10 December 1974, refers to a discussion in which Kit Green reportedly “reluctantly” confirmed that there was a group of 15 engineers in the Midwest (which Vallee assumed was McDonnell in St Louis) that was secretly doing UFO research for the CIA under cover of “aeronautical research”. By April 1975, Kit Green was contacting various other ufologists. Vallee’s journal comments, in an entry dated 26 April 1985, “Kit is now talking to every ufologist worth his salt”. Hal and Vallee agreed that Kit Green simply didn’t have the right access (see entry dated 2 October 1975). Despite that conclusion, Vallee and Kit Green continued to discuss UFOs for years afterwards. An entry dated 22 May 1978 commented that Kit Green was in “close contact with most of the UFO groups, so his interest is only confidential among the uninformed”.

As is relatively well-known, some material involving Kit Green features in Mark Pilkington’s UFO book “Mirage Men” (which focuses to a considerable extent upon Richard Doty) and he also appears in the related documentary of the same name. Unfortunately, the discussion in Mirage Men does not cover many of the issues regarding ufology arising from the other sources and material referred to above. The most interesting aspect of discussion of Kit Green in Mirage Men is undoubtedly the (brief) discussion of his “close and long-standing” friendship with Rick Doty, of whom Kit Green reportedly spoke “with unguarded warmth and respect”. That friendship has also been mentioned (also briefly) elsewhere, including in a post by Springer here on ATS back in 2006 and in a related discussion at the same time on the Reality Uncovered forum.



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 01:43 PM
link   
Robert Collins has (in his controversial book “Exempt from Disclosure”) stated that Kit Green was “Blue Jay” in the Aviary, joining the group in 1989. (Armen Victorian wrote an article for the Nexus Magzine for October-November 1993 (i.e. Volume 2 Number 16) which discussed the Aviary, also naming (at page 15) Kit Green as “Bluejay” in the Aviary.) Bob Collins stated in that book that, in April 1989, he attended a “mini-summit” with Kit Green, Hal Puthoff, Rick Doty, Bill Moore and Jaime Shandera in April 1989 in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at a motel. He claims that “This meeting dealt with the aftershocks from the “UFO Cover-Up Live” show and how to proceed with the new sources” and that “Kit Green took center stage by proposing several lines of attack involving disclosure strategies”.

Todd Zechel’s controversial first “Associated Investigator's Report” (“AIR”), a document heavily criticised in responses by (among others) Bruce Maccabee states that



“According to Maccabee, Green sought out Bill Moore in 1988 or 1989, shortly after Moore had his 15 minutes of fame as a technical consultant for "UFO Cover-Up? Live!," the disastrous two-hour TV special that featured back-lit ravings by "Falcon" Doty and "Condor" Collins. Subsequently, Green became BLUEJAY in Moore's fabled aviary, although it's unclear if Green realized he'd become a member of the flock. But then birds of a feather do flock together, don't they? According to Maccabee's account, "BLUEJAY" Green volunteered to carry out special missions for Moore, the confessed disinformationist. One of these assignments involved Green trying to make contact with Robert Gates, the Director of Central Intelligence under President George Bush. It appears Moore told Green that Gates held some lofty position in the current configuration of the mythical "MJ-12," and Green was supposed to approach gates by passing some sort of code word or phrase, a scenario right out of an old pulp spy novel. Maccabee, with some disgust, says Green "bungled" the code word and the rendevous fell through”.


In a follow-up document (“AIR Report 1.5”), Todd Zechel referred to Ron Pandolfi (see Section H4 below) and Christopher "Kit" Green as :



“… CIA officials in charge of department that sponsors and controls paranormal (extrasensory) and UFO research projects. Suspected of providing "covert funding" from CIA/DIA 'black' slush fund to selected UFO researchers and proponents through money laundering and cut-outs. Responsible for CIA's UFO files. Green issued an order in 1979 to take UFOs "off the record" within the CIA in order to prevent CIA's interest in UFOs from being disclosed”.


edit on 8-7-2015 by IsaacKoi because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 01:44 PM
link   
During 2007, Dan Smith (best known for his friendship with Ron Pandolfi, see Section H4 below) paid Gus Russo to attempt to write an overview of the apparent interest of the intelligence community in UFOs. The article produced by Gus Russo (entitled “The Real X-Files – Is Uncle Sam a Closet Ufologist?”) include a quote from “Jim” (clearly Kit Green) stating:



“I believe there’s a ‘core story’, … but I don’t know what it is. I have been told by people more senior than me that there is some truth to it, but they told me time and time again to stop pursuing it with CIA people and other intel types. Two very senior officials told me they saw briefing books, (however) the only ones who would be cleared to know the story are the most senior Pentagon career officers. … I have spoken to three former Presidents and the subject always comes up, not as a briefing, but they also want to know the truth. But apparently they aren’t cleared for it.


Kit Green can be seen discussing more mainstream intelligence issues in the “Umbrella Assassin” episode of the PBS series “Secrets of the Dead” (see 16 minutes 50 seconds into video):



During 2006, an announcement was made here on ATS that Kit Green had joined “the AboveTopSecret.com Team”, in a thread entitled ”HUGE NEWS and AboveTopSecret.com Moves To the Next Level!”. Various possibilities were floated in that thread for Kit Green to contribute to the research being performed by members of ATS. Unfortunately I've seen very little other material on ATS drawing upon Dr Green's expertise and past experiences, which contrasts with the amount of speculation I've seen on ATS in relation to him. Kit Green did appear in a series of video interviews by ATS News. Those relatively long videos are each about Swine Flu conspiracies. Personally, I find input basically limited to the topic of swine flu to be somewhat surprisingly and disappointing, given Kit Green’s notoriety in relation to ufos and remote viewing and the fact that ATS has many, many more discussions about UFOs than swine flu… :



Kit Green appears to have been relatively willing in discussions elsewhere to discuss his involvement in relation to remote viewing projects. Apart from the various books that discuss that involvement at some length, he has featured in documentaries relating to remote viewing. In particular, he can be seen in the full 1.5 version of the BBC documentary about Uri Geller directed by Vikram Jayanti discussed in Section G4 above (for which a link and password can be found on a page on Uri Geller’s website). For example, at 20 minutes 10 seconds into that version of the documentary he discusses his initial informal test of Geller’s remote viewing abilities over the telephone.

Kit Green also gave a presentation on remote viewing at the IRVA Conference 2012, which is summarised in Eight Martinis Issue 8 (at page 15). That summary indicates that Kit Green expressed the opinion that the first 10 years of remote viewing was 100% verifiable and correct but that statistics became lower because “We came to believe anyone could be a remote viewer”.

Straightforward factual accounts from Kit Green of his involvement in ufology are harder to find. At present, the publically available material appears to be largely limited to accounts written by third parties.

edit on 8-7-2015 by IsaacKoi because: (no reason given)

edit on 8-7-2015 by IsaacKoi because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 01:44 PM
link   

Section H4 : Ron Pandolfi (CIA, "Aviary", UFO Working Group)



Roland Pandolfi has been referred to as a successor of Kit Green as the CIA’s “Keeper of the Weird”, working on the CIA’s “Weird Desk”.

Ron Pandolfi was referred to in a Pulitzer prize-winning article by Jeff Gerth in The New York Times on 9 December 1998 as a CIA scientist and analyst. That article did not relate to either remote viewing or ufology. The article referred to a controversy involving Ron Pandolfi regarding allegations that Hughes Space and Communications, “without proper authorization, gave China technological insights that are crucial to the successful launchings of satellites and ballistic missiles”. The article reported that in 1995, the Central Intelligence Agency “ignored warnings raised that year by one of its scientists, Ronald Pandolfi, that Hughes may have provided crucial ballistic missile technology to China”.

Jim Schnabel’s book on remote viewing referred very briefly to Ron Pandolfi. In the context of a remark about growing scepticism within the CIA about the entire remote-viewing program, Schnabel stated that Ron Pandolfi had (as part of his tasking within the CIA to monitor new and exotic technologies) been “battling for years with Jack Vorona and Dale Graff over access to Sun Streak” (i.e. the remote viewing project). Schnabel stated that Vorona and Graff “managed to keep him off the clearance list; Pandolfi, in their opinion, only wanted to shut the program down forever” (see pages 347-348 of Jim Schnabel’s book “Remote Viewers”).



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 01:44 PM
link   
Pandolfi is best known within ufology as an alleged member of the Aviary. Armen Victorian wrote an article for the Nexus Magazine for October-November 1993 (i.e. Volume 2 Number 16) which discussed the Aviary which referred (at page 15) to Ron Pandolfi as “Pelican” in the Aviary. In a recorded telephone conversation between Ron Pandolfi and Armen Victorian, Ron Pandolfi appears to acknowledge the name “Pelican” as his bird-name in the Aviary. In the same conversation, he also stated that he attended the first meeting of the UFO Working Group, which he stated was organised by John Alexander (see Section H5 below) and Kit Green. (The relevant section is at 20 minutes 30 seconds into the recording of the relevant conversation).

Phil Klass, in his “Skeptics UFO Newsletter” in September 1993 (SUN23) reported on lectures given by Bruce Maccabee to interested CIA employees at informal “brown-bag lunches” in 1979 onwards. The first invitation came from Kit Green (see Section H3 above). Later invitations came from Ron Pandolfi, including an invitation to give a luncheon talk on the MJ-12 papers. Bruce Maccabee reportedly told Klass that “Pandolfi later told him that his MJ-12 lecture had created ‘a lot of spies within the Agency’ as members of the audience later attempted to locate MHJ-12 related documents”. Klass stated that “a knowledgeable source” told him that “Pandolfi’s choice of speakers is intended to help the CIA’s Directorate of Science and Technology ‘develop a paradigm to enable it to distinguish between things we don’t understand which may be important and things which are pseudoscience”.

Bruce Maccabee’s recent book “The FBI CIA UFO Connection” (2014) included a discussion of these lectures to CIA employees. He states that “Kit seemed to treat the subject as something of medium importance, not very important but also not something to laugh about”. He contrasted that attitude with the one displayed by Ron Pandolfi : “Ron, on the other hand, seemed to treat it as a joke or an amusement, at least initially”. Bruce Maccabee states that he wondered for several years why the CIA was taking an interest in UFOs but “then, in 1990, Ron told me the official reason : the possibility of espionage”. Maccabbee reports that Pandolfi said that “in the 1970s, the CIA had obtained ‘firm evidence’ that the KGB had devised a plan to use US citizens, including ufologists, to penetrate US defense programs”.

edit on 8-7-2015 by IsaacKoi because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 01:45 PM
link   
Phil Klass, in his “Skeptics UFO Newsletter” in November 1993 (SUN24) reported that Ron Pandolfi had received a request from Dr John Gibbons, President Clinton’s Chief Science advisor, that the CIA provide a background paper on UFOs. Klass reported that Pandolfi had passed on this request to “his good friend” Bruce Maccabee, who produced a 10 page UFO report.

Various researchers have written about the request by Dr John Gibbons, including Grant Cameron. In an email to the UFO UpDates discussion List in July 2001 and a subsequent email in September 2001, Grant Cameron wrote that C B Scott Jones (see Section H7 below) had been “sharing information CIA agent Ronald Pandolfi” and that Pandolfi “was the CIA agent called in by the Clinton White House to provide information on UFOs when Rockefeller made his first approach to the White House”. Grant Cameron’s informative “Presidentialufo.com” website includes a section on Bill Clinton which includes a number of articles about the relevant Clinton White House request for a briefing from the CIA and a related attempt by Laurance Rockefeller to obtain the release of information regarding UFOs. Those articles include a multi-part series entitled “Extraterrestrial Politics” which discusses relevant documents. Grant Cameron has helpfully made the relevant White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) documents available on his website, including a note of a discussion between C B Scott Jones and Ron Pandolfi on 15 April 1993 – which referred to the CIA asking Bruce Maccabee to produce a relevant briefing.






The “Associated Investigator's Report 1.5” (“AIR 1.5”), a document by controversial researcher Todd Zechel (whose first report had been very heavily criticised in responses by (among others) Bruce Maccabee) asserted that Roland "Ron" Pandolfi and Christopher "Kit" Green were:


“… CIA officials in charge of department that sponsors and controls paranormal (extrasensory) and UFO research projects. Suspected of providing "covert funding" from CIA/DIA 'black' slush fund to selected UFO researchers and proponents through money laundering and cut-outs. Responsible for CIA's UFO files. Green issued an order in 1979 to take UFOs "off the record" within the CIA in order to prevent CIA's interest in UFOs from being disclosed”.


edit on 8-7-2015 by IsaacKoi because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 01:45 PM
link   
Ron Pandolfi appears to have had an interest in Richard Doty which pre-dates Doty becoming an infamous character within ufology.

Kit Green and Ron Pandolfi are mentioned in various (contradictory and generally almost incomprehensible) articles online in relation to a meeting with Air Force colonels Barry Hennessey and Richard Weaver following the infamous 1988 TV show "UFO Cover Up Live", presented by Mike Farrell. This is the show in which a supposed member of the intelligence community, "Falcon", revealed that the favourite snack of alien visitors to Earth is strawberry ice-cream - see 1 hour 15 minutes into the show, embedded below. Bill Moore appears a few times in the show, as does "Falcon" (i.e Richard Doty). The main section in which Moore discusses MJ-12 and his contacts with government agents is just after 1 hour 2 minutes into the show. There is a partial transcript of the show online here. I have collated references to discussion of this show in a couple of dozen UFO books are given in a table here. In his book “The FBI CIA UFO Connection” (2014), Bruce Maccabee states that the “possibility of unintentional espionage is the basic reason why Ron called two Air Force Colonels” (unnamed by Bruce Maccabee, but commonly named in articles online as Barry Hennessey and Richard Weaver) to the CIA “to testify regarding the claims made by ‘Falcon’ during the ‘UFO Cover-up?Live!’ TV show”. Bruce Maccabee reported that Ron Pandolfi “wanted to know if either of them was Bill Moore’s secret source, Falcon” and, if not, “he wanted to know what they knew about Falcon and about AFOSI Richard Doty”. Maccabee also reported that two years later, in November 1990, “Ron told me why he was so interested in Falcon and another person who was presumed to exist that was known only as ‘Number 1’”. Ron reportedly stated that the “top people (in the Agency) are assuming that #1 is a KGB spy who leaks names of real defense programs as (if they were clandestine) UFO programs” in the hope that ufologists would try to penetrate those programs and publicize secret technology.



One episode indicating Pandolfi’s interest in Richard Doty is mentioned by Patrick Huyghe in his book "Swamp Gas Times: My Two Decades on the Ufo Beat". Patrick Huyghe stated the following (at pages 102-103 of that book):



In the late 1990s Ron Pandolfi, the CIA's "keeper of the weird" asked Dan Smith and a low-key UFO researcher by the name of Bill LaParl to collect all the data available on Rick Doty and his alleged source, the "raven". LaParl's dozen page report with its supporting documents was apparently quite thorough. This report was circulated in some pretty high offices, perhaps even to the commander-in-chief, according to rumor. The situation led Smith to wonder: "How can one staff sergeant cause so much heart burn...?"


(I asked Dan Smith a year or two ago whether he still had a copy of the relevant “report” on Rick Doty. I did not receive any answer from Dan Smith to that particular question in the relevant thread on the Open Minds Forum.

A post by Terry Blanton in September 2000 on the UFO Updates email discussion List stated that Dan Smith was banned from CompuServe “for declaring Himself to be the proverbial Spirit of Truth” since “some staff members were afraid his SOT rantings could cause psychological trauma for forum members”. Terry Blanton commented that “Ron has gotten in trouble for leading Dan down the yellow brick road



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 01:46 PM
link   
Dan Smith has written a very considerable volume of material about his contact with Ron Pandolfi (which, partly due to Dan Smith’s style of writing, is not always easy to follow – heck, it’s almost incomprehensible). For an introduction to Dan Smith and his contact with Ron Pandolfi, it is generally easier to read material written by third parties than the impenetrable material by Dan Smith himself or the extremely sparse material by Ron Pandolfi. See, for example, Vince Johnson’s article “The Aviary, the Aquarium, and Eschatology” (1993) (based on interviews with Ron Pandolfi, Dan Smith and others).

Due to the volume and style of material on Dan Smith's Best Possible World website, to enable more efficient and effective searching of that material I've created PDF copies of that website as at 2001 and 2013. With Dan Smith's permission, I've uploaded the 2013 version to the link below:
app.box.com...

It is then possible to run EXTREMELY fast searches of the material on Dan's website (and, if you like, also at the same time search PDF copies of specified other websites, forums and official documents) for, say, Ron/Pandolfi/P/Catfish/CF/Mr P or Kit/Green/BJ.



During 2007, Dan Smith paid Gus Russo to attempt to write an overview of the apparent interest of the intelligence community in UFOs. The article produced by Gus Russo (entitled “The Real X-Files – Is Uncle Sam a Closet Ufologist?”) refers to the relationship between Dan Smith and a CIA analyst referred to as “Tom” (clearly Ron Pandolfi). Gus Russo’s article stated that “when pressed for details … Tom only gives obtuse, often cryptic answers as to why the monitoring of the UFO crowd consumes what one insider estimates as 20% of his publicly funded workday”.

Pandolfi’s interest in Rick Doty has continued in more recent years. Many of you will be aware that the documentary “Mirage Men” focuses on Rick Doty. However, how many of you know that the suggestion for that documentary on Rick Doty was made by Ron Pandolfi? Pandolfi made the suggestion to John Lundberg in 2003/2004, when John was working on another documentary - “The Mythologist”. “The Mythologist “ focused on another, um, colourful character (i.e. Armen Victorian). Pandolfi clearly provided some input into that earlier documentary, with his name appearing repeatedly in the background of that documentary e.g. in the screen-shot below.



John Lundberg's wrote an item online on the genesis of Mirage Men referring to a relevant discussion with “Don”. Mark Pilkington’s book “Mirage Men” contained a slightly inconsistent discussion in your "Mirage Men" book at pages 9-10 & 14. I contacted Mark Pilkington about the genesis of “Mirage Men” and he kindly confirmed that the relevant conversation was with Ron Pandolfi. Interestingly, Mark Pilkington’s discussion of that conversation between Ron Pandolfi and John Lundberg includes a reported comment by John Lundberg that “Everything he’s told me so far has turned out to be a lie”.



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 01:46 PM
link   
In 2006, Ron Pandolfi was involved in an exchange of emails between Ron Pandolfi, Kit Green and others regarding Rick Doty. Those emails were put online by Gary Bekkum on his Starpod.us blog (and copied on other websites, such as Toasted Dolphin) and also featured heavily in Gary Bekkum’s book “Spies, Lies and Polygraph Tape”. In those emails, Ron Pandolfi expressed his view that Rick Doty “most likely” had fabricated information relating to the Serpo hoax and said that he was “again … drawn to the question why would Rick go to so much trouble for no apparent financial return?”. In one of those emails during 2006, Pandolfi stated to Rick Doty that Pandolfi’s only interest in Doty “concerns national security” and that Pandolfi had “only marginal reason to suspect” Doty was “involved with a foreign intelligence service” and that he would “be glad to put this issue to rest if you would agree to cooperate”. In another email, Pandolfi said to Doty that his action suggested Doty “remain involved in potentially hostile intelligence activities” and that “one concern is that you may have been fishing for the name of real intelligence officers”. A further email from Ron Pandolfi in 2006 (to Caryn Anscomb, Kit Green and Dan Smith) stated that various claims by Richard Doty “appear to conflict with what most of us generally perceive as reality”. (Incidentally, those emails also include a message from Ron Pandolfi thanking Doty for Doty’s recommendation that Pandolfi peruse the ATS forum. Pandolfi commented that ATS “contained excellent background information”).

The emails posted online in 2006 also included comments by Pandolfi on Dan Smith. Pandolfi stated that “Dan is insane, but he also is a good friend” and that Pandolfi tends “to let him enjoy his delusional meanderings”.

Ryan Dube of the Reality Uncovered website has also stated that his first contact with Ron Pandolfi was in 2006. That contact reportedly came when Doty began harassing one of his moderators. Gus Russo has reported that Ryan Dube state that “Tom” (i.e. Ron Pandolfi) “contacted us in 2006, via email, with a request to assist him in his investigation of Richard Doty” and that Pandolfi “wanted to know the details of the harassment and Rick's supervisor contact information”.

Ryan Dube wrote about Pandolfi and Doty again in 2008 in a discussion on the Reality Uncovered website about an audio recording of a conversation between Doty and Robert Collins, in which Ryan Dube quoted an email from Pandolfi to Rick Doty supporting Robert Collins that reportedly stated:



"Rick,

Some wing nuts within the UFO Community might not think much of Robert Collins, but within the senior ranks of the intelligence and defense communities, there are many who consider him an honest and respectable citizen who served this country well. Go after Collins in court, and you are going to have us testifying on his behalf. And we are prepared to open the books.

Ron"


In 2009, ufologist Robert Hastings forwarded to the UFO UpDates email discussion list several emails from Ron Pandolfi about Richard Doty. In those emails, Pandolfi stated (among other things) “Doty also threatened me several times”, stating “He threatened me for exposing his hoaxing of other people's identities via phony yahoo accounts”.

Further information about Ron Pandolfi can be found on various websites, including the Bibliotecapleyades website, and also here, on the sadly defunct UfoMind website, and on a defunct website relating to a commercial venture ([url=/qjytwz4]“Technology Assisted Counter Poaching”) in which Ron Pandolfi acted as executive director.



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 01:47 PM
link   

Section H5 : John Alexander (US Army, "Aviary", UFO Working Group, NIDS, PSI-TECH)



Much has already been written by various people about John Alexander - including by John Alexander himself. John Alexander’s various books (particularly “UFOs – Myths, Conspiracies and Realities”) discuss his attempts to investigate UFOs while working for the US Army and afterwards.

In his book “UFOs – Myths, Conspiracies and Realities”, John Alexander describes his work for Major General Bert Stubblebine (see Section H8 below) at the United States Army Intelligence and Security Command (INSCOM). Alexander refers to how, under “the guidance and protection” of Major General Stubblebine, Alexander “actively pursued a wide range of topics including … remote viewing and psychokinesis to firewalking, orgone energy weather modification, and primary perception”.

Jim Schnabel's amusing book "Remote Viewers" includes the following (at page 276-277):


"Not long after Stubblebine reached INSCOM in 1981, Army intelligence began to blossom under his influence with alternative, New Age-style thinking ... An INSCOM staff colonel named John Alexander oversaw many of these projects for Stubblebine ... Most officers involved with remote viewing or other paranormal subjects worried that the association would hurt their chances for quick promotions. Not Alexander. He often commented that in his case the reverse was true".


An insight into Alexander’s early views can be gained by reading John Alexander’s article “The New Mental Battlefield”, which spoke in positive terms of psychokinesis (including spoon-bending) and Kirlian photography. That article is notable for its place of publication : the “Military Review” journal. The Military Review is described on its current website as “The U.S. Army’s cutting edge forum for original thought and debate on the art and science of land warfare”, commenting that its authors and readers “comprise researchers, politicians, leaders, academics, and heads of industry”. The guidelines for submissions to that journal state that “Military Review’s target audience includes senior noncommissioned officers, warrant officers, company and field grade officers, flag officers, scholars and journalists, Department of Defense and Department of State civilians, Congressional staff, and professionals in partner nations”.





edit on 8-7-2015 by IsaacKoi because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 01:47 PM
link   
The remote viewing documents released by the CIA include US Air Force Air University study by Lieutenant Colonel Dolan M. McKelvy entitled "Psychic Warfare : Exploring the Mind Frontier" which refers to John Alexander’s article and indicates that the article was continuing to influence the thinking of some within the US military several years later.








Probably the most famous (or infamous) of the varied exotic topics considered by John Alexander while working for the US Army was spoon-bending. John Alexander features at 31 minutes 8 seconds onward in the remote viewing documentary “The Real X Files: America's Psychic Spies” below, written and narrated by Jim Schnabel. He discusses spoon-bending (or rather, in this particular instance, fork-bending):




posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 01:48 PM
link   
John Alexander is best known within ufology as the organiser of a group of individuals from various government agencies and companies, generally referred to the “UFO Working Group” (although that group itself adopted the name “Advanced Theoretical Physics Conference” – sometimes abbreviated to “ATP” - in a deliberate attempt to avoid the use of the term “UFO”). The main meeting of that group took place on 20-25 May 1985 at facilities of defense contractor BDM. The extent of that group’s other activities is controversial. The relevant controversy can essentially be traced back to Howard Blum’s book “Out There”, published in 1990.

As discussed above, Howard Blum’s “Out There” was the first book to discuss the UFO Working Group. Blum claimed that “Colonel Harold E Phillips of the DIA” put reports of remote-viewing sessions relating to UFOs to “good use” and persuaded the DIA that “the time had come to convene a top-secret working group to investigate the possibility that extraterrestrials were making contact with this planet”. Blum gave extremely detailed accounts (with no sources cited) of meetings of the “new interagency working group” relating to UFOs. Blum purported to quote remarks by various (unnamed) members of that working group at its meetings, including “a longtime veteran of the CIA’s Directorate of Science and Technology”. Blum also purported to summarise presentations to the UFO Working Group by various individuals, including Major General James C Pfautz.

Howard Blum’s book was written at a time when few details were publicly known and very few of those involved had discussed the UFO Working Group. (Even today, few of them have given many details). Thus, Blum had relatively little material available to him in order to produce an accurate factual account about the UFO Working Group. This may explain at least some of the many factual inaccuracies in the book. Also, with the benefit of access to the documents on official remote viewing projects it appears that Blum may have confused some issues regarding UFO projects with the remote viewing projects.

However, some of the mistakes (e.g. referring to Condon as the head of Project Blue Book or the book “The Philadelphia Experiment” as a novel) are rather less easy to explain in these ways. John Alexander has put the matter far more bluntly in his book “UFOs : Myths, Conspiracies and Realities”, stating that most of Blum’s book “is pure poppycock”.

Numerous UFO researchers (including several skeptics) were quick to point to factual errors in Blum’s book. Len Stringfield stated (in his Status Report VI) that Howard Blum’s book is “loaded with errors” with “many dozens of errors, little evidence”. Jerome Clark (in an editorial in the IUR journal for September/October 1990) wrote that Blum’s book was “a major disappointment” and that it was “filled with errors, bloating with padding”. In the same issue of the IUR journal, Mark Rodeghier wrote a review of Blum’s book in which Rodeghier made the comment (which, sadly, could be applied to many UFO books…) that “the reader cannot fail to be underwhelmed by the book’s claims compared to to its performance”. A book review in the MUFON Journal by Dennis Stacy gave reasons for the view that Blum’s book “is marred by a number of factual and suppositional errors that indicate either sloppy research on Mr Blum’s part, simple inattention to detail, or a headlong rush into print, or perhaps all three” (see the MUFON Journal, September 1990, pages 15-16). In a discussion of Blum’s “Out There” on the UFO Updates email discussion List in August 1997 Stanton Friedman commented that the book is “loaded with false information, false reasoning, and lots of fiction”.

Several prominent UFO skeptics shared the dim view expressed by most of the UFO community concerning Blum’s book. For example, a book review by Philip J Klass mentioned that he counted 25 factual errors in relation to him in the five pages in which Blum discussed Klass. Klass concluded his book review by stating by stating that “Out There” could “more accurately be titled ‘Spaced Out’” (see the book review entitled “Examining Another UFO ‘True Story’’' in the Skeptical Inquirer Vol. 15 Issue 2, Winter 1991, pages 181-183).

Thus, Blum appears to have achieved something that few can claim to have done – i.e. causing Klass to express basically the same view as many prominent ufologists. Incidentally, Klass and Blum can be seen discussing ufology and Blum’s book in an Oprah Winfrey talk show from 1990 embedded below. See in particular the segment with Blum at 10 minutes 30 seconds onwards and the response by Klass at 12 minutes 15 seconds onwards:



Despite the number of negative comments made about the book, I must say that there are a number of items which were revealed in that book apparently for the first time which do check out – so (despite all of its flaws) it clearly wasn’t the _complete_ fabrication which some comments suggested. There are so many factual errors, however, that it is debatable whether it makes more sense to look at relevant issues from scratch rather than trying to work out what Blum got right and what he got wrong. Since Blum’s book has been published and is relatively well known within ufology, personally I think it is worth seeking to address its content (deeply flawed though it may be) rather than simply dismissing it and hoping it will go away. The history of ufological discussions shows that flawed stories and claims do not go away unless they are addressed (and, even then, incorrect claims have a stubborn unwillingness to die).

Relatively soon after publication of Blum’s book, several researchers began to suggest that the real name of the “Colonel Harold E Phillips” that organised the UFO Working Group was in fact John Alexander.




top topics



 
294
<< 1  2  3    5  6  7 >>

log in

join