It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Bird mystery: Thousands disappear and abandon eggs, nests on island off Florida's Gulf Coast

page: 7
78
<< 4  5  6    8 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 08:48 PM
link   
what gets me is no one reports seeing flocks of birds flying any where.
i know here from time to time we get flocks of black birds fly by that last any where from 2 to i'd say 10 minutes, and that's all you can see.

i would think flocks of tens of thousands would have been seen. unless they headed out into the gulf, but even then you would think a boat, ship or oil rig would have seen them.

you know the more i think about it, i say Aliens took them. maybe they'll bring them back in a about 5 days.




posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 08:51 PM
link   
This article details research done on the disappearance. It is written by a researcher who was on the island.
www.alachuaaudubon.org... es-bad-news/



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 08:53 PM
link   

originally posted by: hounddoghowlie
what gets me is no one reports seeing flocks of birds flying any where.
i know here from time to time we get flocks of black birds fly by that last any where from 2 to i'd say 10 minutes, and that's all you can see.

i would think flocks of tens of thousands would have been seen. unless they headed out into the gulf, but even then you would think a boat, ship or oil rig would have seen them.

you know the more i think about it, i say Aliens took them. maybe they'll bring them back in a about 5 days.


Ha! Yeah I have seen huge bird flocks before too. You would think somebody would notice that many birds heading somewhere.

Must be aliens...

edit on 7/8/15 by Vasa Croe because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 09:45 PM
link   
I wonder if it could be something as simple as a severe pesty bug infestation? I was poking around the web, researching what could cause a mass nesting ground exodus and it's a possibility, it's happened before.
This is a link to a book I found which I unfortunately can't cut and paste from. It discusses the different types of tick and similar infestations that can overcome nests that are used repeatedly.
The scientists on Seahorse key ruled out several things as being the cause but I didn't see any mention that they ruled out an insect infestation.



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 10:00 PM
link   

originally posted by: meemaw
I wonder if it could be something as simple as a severe pesty bug infestation? I was poking around the web, researching what could cause a mass nesting ground exodus and it's a possibility, it's happened before.
This is a link to a book I found which I unfortunately can't cut and paste from. It discusses the different types of tick and similar infestations that can overcome nests that are used repeatedly.
The scientists on Seahorse key ruled out several things as being the cause but I didn't see any mention that they ruled out an insect infestation.


Not sure, though I wouldn't think a pest infestation would affect all of the different birds at the same time. I guess it could if the pests suddenly "hatched" and moved in. Though I would think they would have taken notice of a bunch of pests in the area.



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 01:44 AM
link   
that's what I wondered... a few of the birds went to another island but not most...didn't anyone see this massive flock of birds fly off , did they leave at night? this reminded me of a show I watched the other night... on an island all the birds left .. they checked the nests very high in the trees, thought it was the white owl, turned out it was raccoon's, that swam to the island, which they thought was too fart... I know this is a different case happened a few years ago and the population has built back up



originally posted by: hounddoghowlie
what gets me is no one reports seeing flocks of birds flying any where.
i know here from time to time we get flocks of black birds fly by that last any where from 2 to i'd say 10 minutes, and that's all you can see.

i would think flocks of tens of thousands would have been seen. unless they headed out into the gulf, but even then you would think a boat, ship or oil rig would have seen them.

you know the more i think about it, i say Aliens took them. maybe they'll bring them back in a about 5 days.



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 05:29 AM
link   
I remember hearing about a bunch of sea lions up north that disappeared over night. Apparently they swam down the coast, hooked up with a bunch more sea lions, had a big ole party and then swam back a few weeks later.

It sounds like I'm joking but it really was something like that.



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 05:41 AM
link   
Last year they started using drones to watch the birds on the island.

www.theledger.com...

I wonder if it is possible that they increased this type of research this year and disturbed the birds. The article said the drone did not seem to bother the birds. But since drones are becoming cheaper and the technology is improving, I wonder if they came back with a quantity of drones this year that caused the birds to flee.

Eagles are a natural predator of birds, and seabird colonies have been known to abandon nests when eagles threaten their safety. They might have mistaken a flock of drones as a flock of predator birds.



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 09:37 AM
link   

originally posted by: BlueAjah
Last year they started using drones to watch the birds on the island.

www.theledger.com...

I wonder if it is possible that they increased this type of research this year and disturbed the birds. The article said the drone did not seem to bother the birds. But since drones are becoming cheaper and the technology is improving, I wonder if they came back with a quantity of drones this year that caused the birds to flee.

Eagles are a natural predator of birds, and seabird colonies have been known to abandon nests when eagles threaten their safety. They might have mistaken a flock of drones as a flock of predator birds.


Hmmm...now there is a possibility I had not thought of. I could see a lot of these biologists using drones for up close viewing of the bird nests...closer than they have ever been able to get before.

Could be possible that there were enough drones there to scare the birds I guess....maybe they did think a drone was a predator and left.

Interesting theory!



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 10:12 AM
link   

originally posted by: BlueAjah
Last year they started using drones to watch the birds on the island.

www.theledger.com...

I wonder if it is possible that they increased this type of research this year and disturbed the birds. The article said the drone did not seem to bother the birds. But since drones are becoming cheaper and the technology is improving, I wonder if they came back with a quantity of drones this year that caused the birds to flee.

Eagles are a natural predator of birds, and seabird colonies have been known to abandon nests when eagles threaten their safety. They might have mistaken a flock of drones as a flock of predator birds.


But if they had drones...wouldn't they have their answer to why the birds left? Wouldn't they have it all on camera if the birds were fleeing drones?



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 10:29 AM
link   
a reply to: Rezlooper

Good point... unless they are trying to cover it up?
I can see outrage in the scientific community if this happened. Especially if it was caused by those who should know better.
The drone operators might have been mortified about what happened, split, and agreed to keep it to themselves.
(Just a theory.)



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 11:19 AM
link   
a reply to: BlueAjah

Really, it's a very good theory.



As technology has improved, prices and flexibility have evolved to the point where the mini-aircraft can now be bought and used by nearly anyone, including birdwatchers or scientists using the new technology to study birds in ways that have never been possible before. But what impact does the drone have on the birds being watched? That is what the researchers set out to learn.

They started by hiring a professional drone pilot to fly around ducks in a local zoo (after getting permission first, of course). Next, they flew the drone around flamingos and greenshanks living in a nature preserve in the southern part of the country. In testing the birds' reaction to the drone flights, the team varied drone color, speed and angle at which they approached the birds. The team reports that the birds appeared to be worried about the drones only when they approached from directly overhead (which is where predators would generally be coming from).

While limited, the study suggests that drones can be used to safely study some birds under some circumstances. It is still not clear if the drones have an impact that is not represented by changes in observable behavior in the birds, however, such as increased heart rates or respiration. The researchers allow that other birds might be adversely impacted, noting that a lot of videos have shown up on the Internet showing birds of prey attacking drones, though in such instances, it is not clear if the birds see the drones as a threat, or a possible meal. At any rate, the researchers suggest that researchers going forward should attempt to assess the possible impact on birds they are studying, by monitoring behavior changes. They also recommend that for such studies, drones be launched at least a hundred meters away from the test subjects and adjust approach speed according to the species under study.


Read more at: phys.org...



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 05:10 PM
link   
It seems that now scientists are considering low flying planes piloted by drug runners or unauthorized drones may be the cause.

CBC article


It would be great if they found some way to monitor the island next season



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 05:22 PM
link   
Perhaps the oil spill is wiping out the food they live off of.



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 05:28 PM
link   

originally posted by: meemaw
It seems that now scientists are considering low flying planes piloted by drug runners or unauthorized drones may be the cause.

CBC article


I hope the problem will be something this easily solved. I doubt even if low-life drug runners would want to deliberately kill off these beautiful birds. Of course, like the rest of it, this is also just speculation.



edit on 7/9/2015 by angeldoll because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 05:38 PM
link   

originally posted by: meemaw
It seems that now scientists are considering low flying planes piloted by drug runners or unauthorized drones may be the cause.

CBC article


It would be great if they found some way to monitor the island next season


I wouldn't be surprised if this ended up being the cause. What a shame if so.



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 06:17 PM
link   
Interesting speculation about the biologist's drones. Another example of observation changing the behavior of that which is being observed.

I hope it is this....... it will be a quick fix, unlike trying to repair climate or fauna, flora, water, or food sources. Let's just hope they weren't so spooked they never come back, and certainly they will immediately discontinue this practice with drones on Snake and surrounding Islands.



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 06:27 PM
link   
Now they have got rid of the birds.
they can start drilling for oil and mining!
or build a us army base!



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 10:13 PM
link   
CERN



posted on Jul, 9 2015 @ 10:29 PM
link   

originally posted by: ChesterJohn
CERN


Targeted a single island?




top topics



 
78
<< 4  5  6    8 >>

log in

join