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Alzhiemer's

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posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 03:08 PM
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Rather personal rant. Perhaps not the best forum but who gives a crap. This is part venting part educational. Anyhow, this disease is brutal. I had no idea. I always thought it was just a slow process where the person loses their memory, like a "part of being old" or in a manner that's rather gentle over time. I was wrong.

My mother was diagnosed 2 years ago. Today she can't speak, feed herself, use the restroom, recognize anyone or basically function as a human being. In need of 24/7 care. I'm 35 years old, she's 62. One day we were living "normal" lives then all of the sudden this...

The last few weeks she lost the ability to communicate and no longer recognizes me. I've been there for her throughout this process but it's becoming...heavy. The decline was rapid. It's literally like watching someone die in front of you, with nothing you can do about it. Minimal treatments, no cure, no nothing but progressively worsening conditions.

We moved her into a nice "memory care" facility, many people can't afford this so I should be grateful for that but it doesn't change her circumstances- it makes it easier on me and my father but even that opens up feelings of guilt, like we're passing off responsibility to other people. Strangers. That's my own issue. Whatever.

Anyhow, the disease itself is, in my opinion, worse than cancer, worse than AIDS, worse than diabetes and or most of the diseases/afflictions that kill millions of people. It's not a "gentle" process. Dying from Alzhiemer's. It's fatal 100% of the time. The body shuts down, along with the mind. They end up being living skeletons, in bed, moaning in pain, or as some strange fading function of the mind. Shells of human beings. I see this in the more advanced patients at the care facility. The last stage of Alzhiemers.

The pathway to that death is full of worsening issues. Starting off with slipping cognitive abilities in the early stage. Simple math problems might be confusing. Reading a clock, writing down a grocery list etc. Then behavioral changes set in. Their personality changes, subtlety at first. Then paranoia sets in. Hallucinations. Many times very frightening hallucinations. Anxiety. Insomnia. "Roaming", prolonged inability to understand the changing world around them. I would imagine it's like being on a bad '___' trip. One that doesn't go away. They prescribe antipsychotic medication for Alzheimer's patients. It helps a little bit.

In the mid stage everyone began to abandon her. Her "friends". Her long time co-workers. Her church group. Even my siblings. It's odd. I guess people don't know what to do or how to react. She had cancer years ago and had a non stop stream of visitors. People bringing meals and cards and balloons. Phone calls from out of country relatives on a routine basis. None of that has been taking place with her advancing Alzhiemers. It's like the person ceaces to exist. The way most people treat mental illness is baffling. I don't think this is uncommon. I've had friends laugh at her condition. Make jokes. One person literally pointed and laughed when she was eating with her hands at a restaurant. You eventually can't even go into most public spaces or situations because of the way people treat them. The looks, the whispers, the laughing and finger pointing. There's no dignity. None. Someone with stage 4 cancer would never be treated this way.

Before we moved her into a care facility I had to move into my mother/fathers house. She couldn't be left alone. I had to "child proof" the oven, the electrical outlets, had to put double sided locks on all the doors. She'd get up at 3am and leave the house. Wondering the street banging on people's doors and windows. One time completly nude. The police picked her up- that's when I moved in with them. Months later we made the move to a care facility. I couldn't do it. Change her diapers, bath her, feed her, constantly attempt to console her when the paranoia and agitation set in. I also had to work. The lack of sleep...the emotional toll is hard to explain. I suppose it may help if one is "comfortable" with death, but even then the decline is heartbreaking and life consuming for caregivers.

I feel for family/caregivers who don't have the money for memory care facilities. Alzhiemer's is brutal, not only for the person suffering from the disease but also for family or primary caregivers at home. It completely consumes your life. You grieve the loss of your loved one as you watch them fade. It just gets worse and worse but there are moments of joy/happiness. Odd moments where a lucid thought comes through, or a few hours of calm. Quiet. Almost normalcy. Think of "babysitting" a frightened child that never sleeps. Maybe it's like that. Worse when the person loses interest in everything. No gardening, no watching TV, no reading...just, for lack of a better term, madness. Many people with advancing Alzhiemers literally go insaine. It's different for different people though.

Part of my point is, we, as a nation, need to throw a lot more time, money and human resources at Alzhiemer's treatment, care and awareness. Millions of people are going to suffer from this. Even more when we consider family members and caregivers. My own initial misunderstanding may be common. How I previously viewed the disease. I didn't really think about it much. I now know its probably the worse way one can die. Emotionally, financially...the whole ball of wax is grossly misunderstood or "unappreciated ". I don't think I've even done a good job of explaining the intricate details. One has to experience it first hand I suppose.

There are millions of people who need help. People not as "fortunate" as my family (we can afford a good care facility). My heart goes out to these families. They need our help. We've been abandoning millions of people. With millions more to come in the future. This should change, but probably won't. Donating to reputable Alzhiemers organizations may help. Reading about the disease may help. Visiting family or friends who suffer from Alzhiemer's WILL help. Being there for people. It takes effort. Funding for families suffering from Alzhiemer's is needed. Funding for care facilities or in home caregivers. More research (R&D) is needed. There always seems to be a promising "cure" just around the corner that never materializes. I think we're generally "dropping the ball" as a nation when it comes to Alzhiemer's. Even many care facilities approach "treatment" in wrong ways. That's a whole other issue. It doesn't just impact people in their 80's/90's. It's not a "graceful death". There's not much help at all unless one has a lot of money or top of the line health insurance. There are families/cargivers out there right now that need our help. Not just the Alzhiemer's patient themselves.

It's not being handled properly. Generally speaking. We can an should do better as a nation. Despite your political views. If you know anyone suffering from Alzhiemer's please help them and their family. In any way you can. No matter how small. It doesn't have to be money. Just be there.




posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 03:15 PM
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I am so sorry that your Mom and family are going through this. There are so many horrible things that happen to people and it breaks my heart. Hugs!



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 03:19 PM
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a reply to: JeanPaul

So sorry to hear that Jean, it's in effect, the worst thing imaginable.

I'm in agreement that it's worse than the other diseases you listed, that may vary depending on personal experience for others...


But I know that which I'd never want to be afflicted with, is that which you mention.



I've often thought if there was a biological agent used in warfare against the populace, Alzheimer's would definitely rank above cancer, AIDS, or motor neurone disease...
Simply for its speedy fatality rate, incurability, lack of easing the aggressiveness, and debilitating factors all combining into the metaphorical Devil of diseases.


Sorry again, and sorry to speculate in your powerful thread, I can't take off the tinfoil hat at times, I also thinks it's a coping mechanism for such heart breaking subjects.
edit on 6-7-2015 by CharlieSpeirs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 03:24 PM
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a reply to: JeanPaul

Truly sorry to hear about your situation...

I work in Long term care and deal with this disease every day... I know your pain

it is a very scary disease... horrible for everyone around the person, and I can only imagine what they are going through personally

Much love




posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 03:33 PM
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a reply to: JeanPaul

I hear ya.

That's in my family as well.

my uncle is currently suffering from the disease.

I look up as much as i can online to see what researchers are finding.

I recommend to everyone start using coconut oil. While it won't stop the disease. it helps. I take it myself.

I find that it help with the brain fog I usually get.

I'm sorry to hear about your mom. it's a horrible disease.
edit on 6-7-2015 by grey580 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 03:44 PM
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I just relived the death of my Mother.

The only difference is it took my Mom 15 years to finally pass.

I also watched the woman that I loved who brought me into this World suffer.

The last person in the World deserving of this hideous Disease and Death Sentence.

But, as hard as it was going there again. Thanks for reminding me of my beautiful Mother.

I have no words to comfort you...There are no words.



edit on 6-7-2015 by whyamIhere because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 03:49 PM
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originally posted by: Night Star
I am so sorry that your Mom and family are going through this. There are so many horrible things that happen to people and it breaks my heart. Hugs!


Thanks for the hugs. I think if I can simplify any complaint it wouldn't so much have to do with my personal experience but more so focused on the millions of people in the same or worse circumstances. The people suffering from Alzheimer's and the families/caregivers who have been abandoned by society. I got a small taste of it when I was a primary caregiver.

In our case the care facility has been a great help but many people don't have this "luxury". If I could strees one point it would be the fact that millions of people out there need help. My families situation, as hard as it is, has been helped out A LOT by the care facility. I would like to see this nation, at the least, come together to help these families who are currently left on an island fighting this disease alone, for a lack of funds.



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 03:51 PM
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once you get passed the stage where you are giving little kids the middle finger, it sucks.

i was ignorant on this too...kinda thought the same things you did.
i saw someone ive known for a long time suffer with it and it changed my thoughts.
pretty brutal



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 03:52 PM
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originally posted by: whyamIhere
I just relived the death of my Mother.

The only difference is it took my Mom 15 years to finally pass.

I also watched the woman that I loved who brought me into this World suffer.

The last person in the World deserving of this hideous Disease and Death Sentence.

But, as hard as it was going there again. Thanks for reminding me of my beautiful Mother.

I have no words to comfort you...There are no words.




Thank you. I understand your experience. Just knowing other people understand helps out.I wish more people understood what this disease does to people/families, without having to go through it themselves.



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 03:57 PM
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originally posted by: Mugly
once you get passed the stage where you are giving little kids the middle finger, it sucks.

i was ignorant on this too...kinda thought the same things you did.
i saw someone ive known for a long time suffer with it and it changed my thoughts.
pretty brutal


Ya, maybe a lot of people share this ignorance or misunderstanding. I think it's why many of my friends have made jokes at my mothers expense. They don't really grasp what's on the line. That she's dying, rather quickly (as far as Alzheimer's is concerned).

I don't blame them, I've also done the same in the past. I remember poking fun at Ronald Reagan. I wouldn't do it now but I did before I understood what this disease does to people.



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 04:11 PM
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a reply to: JeanPaul

I'm sorry about you're situation. I can't imagine having to go through that.
I think the "joking" is the equivalent of whistling past the grave yard. If you make fun of it it won't scare you so much and maybe it won't happen to you. That's not to excuse it because really there is no excuse.



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 04:26 PM
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I empathise with what you are going through. I lost my grandmother and mother just 2 years ago to this filthy disease.
It's heartbreaking.

As another member has mentioned, I too am taking coconut oil, not daily, just when I feel an 'urge'. I have told my children, as I am a candidate for it down the maternal line, that they are to put me in a home and only visit when they want to, not because they feel they should. They have already seen their grandmother and great grandmother die of it.....and that is quite enough.


Jane



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 04:34 PM
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Sorry this has happened to your mother.
You wrote it out really well. I realize it's different for each person but none of this was covered in the movie Alice. I felt that should have shown more than it did. I've had a few relatives succumb to this disease but wasn't around them at the time to experience it. My aunt in England had it but I didn't know. She always wrote letters. I noticed they started to become a real mess, but she said it was her vision failing, then the letters just stopped.

Scary disease to have and watch.

Thanks for sharing your story.



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 04:35 PM
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I'm sorry about your Mum and it sucks you have to go through this. Nobody should have to go through this.


My other half used to work in a care home for people with Alzheimer's. It was horrible. Having to watch them literally degrade into nothingness.
It scares me to think I may have to go through the same one day, i'm not mentally strong enough.



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 04:56 PM
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a reply to: JeanPaul

I know what you mean about people needing more help. My husband can no longer afford his insulin for type 2 diabetes. He has a couple of vials left. We are still seeking help. What happens is that we make a little too much to qualify for any real help. Too many people are just falling through the cracks. The cost of medical coverage and having high deductibles and limits to reach is astoundingly high. My husbands meds would be over a thousand dollars a month with the insulin and that is with medical and prescription coverage! It's an outrage!



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 05:17 PM
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My thoughts are with you and your family.

I was in a very similar situation as you a couple years ago. I'm currently 24, but back in December of 2011 my dad started acting... strange. He was put on paid administrative leave (or something like that) from work in the spring of 2012, and was then diagnosed with Alzheimer's in the summer of 2012 and could no longer work and had his license to drive revoked, sparking the idea that he could get a scooter since they don't require licenses in NC. By the end of 2012 his speach was starting to get slurred, he was convinced somebody "stole his scooter" that he never had, and had no sense of time; He would sleep for a couple hours at a time and would wander around, often going outside in the middle of the night looking for his scooter, going to houses around the neighborhood and looking in odd places for this scooter; including under my sister's kitchen sink in the cabinets! If it wasn't so sad it would be funny...

But you're right. It's just like watching someone die slowly in front of you but there's no way you can help. By the spring of 2013 my dad could no longer talk and was having trouble walking. He fell many times that spring/summer, trying to walk but falling over. It wasn't much longer and he couldn't walk at all, and he passed away in his sleep at the age of 61 in late fall of 2013.

It was about 18 months from the time that he was diagnosed until he passed away. I miss him every day... but not the way he went out. I miss who he was before. My mother took care of him the entire time, with the help of my sister, brother-in-law, and I, and in the later stages some home hospice workers.

I'll never forget the morning my mom called about 2 or 3 AM, crying saying he had died. I've never gotten dressed and out the door so fast in my life, to go be with her. When my grandma came over, walked into the room and looked at him and said "My baby boy!" and started crying...

Alzheimer's is a terrible, terrible disease that I wouldn't even wish on my most hated enemies. Every time I hear or read news about a breakthrough in Alzheimer's research, or a possible treatment being tested, I always stop what I'm doing and pay attention. If I could I'd help out in ridding the world of this terrible disease, but there's nothing I have to offer. I was so glad when Joe from NLBS donated money to the Alzheimer's foundation. Stories like yours hit close to home for me.

Thanks for sharing your story, and once again, I'll keep you in my thoughts. I wish you the best, and I'm truly sorry for what you're going through. Stay strong.



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 05:24 PM
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Also wants to say, very sad to hear about your mom. First a Dance with cancer and now alzheimers ;(

First my personale expirance with alzheimers, AS a little boy my mom's mother Got it. I dont recall how long after she got alz. Before she died. But Maybe a year.

Now my mother sister has gotten alzheimers ;( i dont know how to do act about it.
other then act like she is fine ( but its Hard. Last friday she Washington very pale ). But really hurts to see a family member becoming, Less a person and the old one i knew is gone.

I am afraid my mom Can get it one Day. Any day

But there is a hope. Motherearth - Natures medicine

Kadara_dk - Mads

Peace and love
edit on 6-7-2015 by kadara_dk because: Forgot to link to website of my pic

edit on 6-7-2015 by kadara_dk because: (no reason given)

edit on 6-7-2015 by kadara_dk because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 05:36 PM
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[=http://www.safeaccessnow.org/medical_cannabis_research_what_does_the_evidence_say]link to website of pic[/url] Many things mother Earth Can cure



I am still trying to man up and tell my family about the LAST try before saying goodbye and instead of a Quick dead. Maybe She Can make a comeback I have used motherearth to cure my herniation
Dont trust in God. Trust in motherearth She is still here.
edit on 6-7-2015 by kadara_dk because: (no reason given)

edit on 6-7-2015 by kadara_dk because: Omg. My iPad f@#%ed up my post. Mods if you Can help out. Fix link and if u Can put my 2 post together again. Peace and i am out. NN



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 06:08 PM
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originally posted by: kadara_dk


Now my mother sister has gotten alzheimers ;( i dont know how to do act about it.
other then act like she is fine ( but its Hard. Last friday she Washington very pale ). But really hurts to see a family member becoming, Less a person and the old one i knew is gone.


Peace and love


For some, me included, at times it's hard to figure out a way to interact with people who have more advanced stages of Alzheimer's. Even the early stages are rough. Only advice I can give is be patient. In the early stages help them break through the denial so they can make plans for the upcoming events.

How to interact with people who suffer from advanced Alzheimer's/dementia is part of the problem. Nothing people should feel guilty about but it's hard to figure out how to deal with it. I'm still confused and conflicted...there's no handbook. Every case is different but in my experience many people end up avoiding them in general. As we do schizophrenics and such.

Maintaining personhood in the face of this disease is a challenge. How to just be in the same room with them for long periods of time is a challenge. Especially if you have a close emotional connection. Well trained/educated caregivers make a big difference. Again, not all people can afford this.

I live in America and wish we could get over the fear of "universal healthcare" when it comes to such diseases. I hate to introduce politics to the issue but it is political. What to do?



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 06:21 PM
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I've been doing research on the over calcification on the body in areas we don't want it and why we have a high rate of calcium deficiency in the areas we do need it.
Disease such as heart disease, dementia, Alzheimer's, high blood pressure & numerous other diseases are caused by a calcification processes.
New research is linking Alzheimer's with the calcification of the pineal gland. Dementia is the calcification of the brain, brain plaque is a result of calcification of the brain sheath. The brain then becomes insulin resisting and so the brain needs fed from another source other than glucose. This is where Ketones come in.

Ketones are an alternative fuel source for the brain. When we fast we enter the mode of Ketosis where the body breaks down fat and muscle tissue to feed the body. Because we are not getting external glucose the body starts using the ketones from your body as fuel for the brain.
Now you can achieve ketosis through diets, fasting but the most efficient and easy way to include ketones into your diet is through Coconut Oil. Coconut oil is the best type of oil for Alzheimer's patients as it allows the brain to bed fed & to repair the broken structures. There is a doctor whose husband was diagnosed with Alzheimer's and how she treated him with Coconut Oil.



Going back to the original post about over calcification and under calcification I found that the reason why calcium is not getting to where it should is because of a deficiency in western diets of Vitamin K2. K2 is the transport vitamin for calcium and has a close link with Vitamin D3 in the removing of calcium from the arterial walls and all over the body and putting it where it should in the bones. The reason we are deficient is down to what we feed our animals, K1 which animals convert to K2 in higher loads than us is abundant in grass, so grassfed animals will have high levels of K2, so anything from milk, to meat from those will have high K2.
Farmer in the west tend to do more grain fed which results in us not getting enough from our diets. We also don't convert K1 to K2 in our bodies so we must get some from our diet or by supplementation. Here's an excellent video explaining the role K2 in our bodies.




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